Research Papers on Irish & Scottish Literature

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

  • Poetic Analysis of William Butler Yeats' 'Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites'

    A 5 page analysis of the wording and underlying meaning of this Irish pub song. The author asserts that Yeats’ poem encapsulates the idealism and the bitterness of the Irish Civil War and that it also encapsulates the societal stature in which the Irish robed their heroes, a stature which was sufficient enough to resolve them of wrongdoing as well. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson's Autobiographical Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    A 5 page essay that makes the point that on the surface, there is little to connect The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde to the events that make up the life of its author Robert Louis Stevenson. Jekyll was English; Stevenson was born in Scotland. Jekyll was a scientist, a doctor; Stevenson a lawyer by education and a writer by profession, and, of course, the fundamental premise of the novel, which is that Jekyll transforms into Hyde, is in the realm of science fiction. However, if one looks below the surface and consider this work for what it says about Stevenson's Victorian mindset, autobiographical aspects begin to emerge. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'A Prayer for My Son' by William Butler Yeats

    A 7 page essay that offers a detailed explication of W.B. Yeats' poem "A Prayer for My Son," which is one of most religious poems, yet it also has secular aspects. By combining these two tonal features, Yeats demonstrates how the divine is intrinsically connected to the cares of everyday life. In this poem, the speaker, by beginning with this relationship to his son, extrapolates from the microcosm of his family life to the macrocosm of the relationship between the divine and humanity, and, in so doing, offers reassurance on the protective quality of love, both human and divine. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Imagery in Ulysses by James Joyce

    A 5 page essay on James Joyce's use of language and imagery in his novel Ulysses. This novel loosely (very loosely) follows the episodes created by Homer in his epic poem The Odyssey. The writer analyzes three chapters from Joyce's Ulysses and argues that, as far as language use is considered, it is similar to a prose poem. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Coole Park and Ballylee, 1931' by William Butler Yeats

    A 5 page essay that examines Yeats' assertion in this poem that 'We were the last romantics…' (line 41). The writer argues that this is a fair assessment and that examining the context of the poem demonstrates Yeat's version of romanticism, which is embedded in his love of the Irish country. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of William Butler Yeats' 'Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites'

    A 5 page analysis of the wording and underlying meaning of this Irish pub song. The author asserts that Yeats’ poem encapsulates the idealism and the bitterness of the Irish Civil War and that it also encapsulates the societal stature in which the Irish robed their heroes, a stature which was sufficient enough to resolve them of wrongdoing as well. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Imagery in Ulysses by James Joyce

    A 5 page essay on James Joyce's use of language and imagery in his novel Ulysses. This novel loosely (very loosely) follows the episodes created by Homer in his epic poem The Odyssey. The writer analyzes three chapters from Joyce's Ulysses and argues that, as far as language use is considered, it is similar to a prose poem. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Coole Park and Ballylee, 1931' by William Butler Yeats

    A 5 page essay that examines Yeats' assertion in this poem that 'We were the last romantics…' (line 41). The writer argues that this is a fair assessment and that examining the context of the poem demonstrates Yeat's version of romanticism, which is embedded in his love of the Irish country. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Assisi' by Norman MacCaig Analyzed

    This 7 page report discusses one poem by the Scottish poet, Norman MacCaig (1910-1996). MacCaig has been hailed as one of Scotland’s greatest poets. Balance is always a key point in MacCaig’s poetry, whether it is the balance between light and dark, man and nature, or man with other men. His skills of observation were also often directed toward the nature of identity and how one individual perceives him/herself and others. Such is the case with MacCaig’s poem “Assisi” that was published in his collection titled “Surroundings” in 1966. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Poetic Explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose”

    In three pages, this poetic explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose” includes basic information on the poet and the poem, identifies the speaker, subject, and ideal, and also considers the poetic devices of imagery, simile, and metaphor. Two sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Depiction of Women in D.H. Lawrence's Women in Love and James Joyce's Ulysses

    This is an 11 page paper discussing the portrayals of women through the characters of Molly in “Ulysses” by James Joyce and Ursula in “Women in Love” by D.H. Lawrence. Both Joyce and Lawrence intended to disrupt the current restrictive roles held by women in society. Joyce’s Molly provided a complete reversal of womanhood and took on a manlike perspective in her actions, words and infidelity. Lawrence’s Ursula however, maintained her independent thoughts and actions as a woman while attaining equality within her relationship and marriage. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Abused Child and Historical Abuses of the Irish in The Butcher Boy by Patrick McCabe

    A 6 page paper which examines the film and novel, written by Patrick McCabe, “The Butcher Boy” as it uses the abused child as a metaphor for the abuse of the Irish in history. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Irish Literary Themes in 1916 by Morgan Llywelyn

    A 5 page paper which how the fiction of Morgan Llywelyn examines the conflict between the soul and the body, the destruction wrought by time, and man’s need to find something permanent in the midst of change. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Ecocriticism and the Literature of John McGahern

    An 8 page paper which examines the literature of John McGahern from an ecocrticial position. The paper examines the relationship between McGahern’s fiction and the physical environment and the relationship between the protagonists and the landscape. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Irish Folklore in the Poetry of William Butler Yeats

    A 10 page emphasis that Yeats' work is important not just from an entertainment perspective but also from the perspective that it preserved a critical chapter in Irish history. Many of his poems capture the spirit of Ireland, the richness of the folklore and the old wives tales as well as the soul of the quest for Irish independence. The author of the paper uses "Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites" and "Sailing to Byzantium" to illustrate this point. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Human Experience In Literature

    This 4 page paper compares and contrasts three stories that best illustrate either representations of common human experience, or are least representative of it. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Dracula by Bram Stoker and the Themes of Sexuality and Perversity

    A 4 page paper which examines how Stoker’s use of character doubles, repetition of events, and recurring images help to underscore the theme of boundary crossing and blurring of opposites that allow for moral distinctions, with the emphasis on sexuality/perversity. No additional sources are used.

  • Stylistic Techniques of Irvine Welsh in Acid House and Trainspotting

    A 5 page essay that analyzes the writing style of Irvine Welsh in 4 short episodes from Trainspotting and Acid House. The writer argues that in representing the speech patterns of working class people, Welsh also addresses the outlook of a subclass of young people who have become trapped in drug addiction and its repercussions. The result of Welsh's approach to storytelling creates an intriguing cultural critique because it presents the perspective of these characters without apology, allowing the reader to see them and draw their own conclusions. No additional sources cited.

  • Dracula by Bram Stoker and the Themes of Sexuality and Perversity

    A 4 page paper which examines how Stoker’s use of character doubles, repetition of events, and recurring images help to underscore the theme of boundary crossing and blurring of opposites that allow for moral distinctions, with the emphasis on sexuality/perversity. No additional sources are used.

  • John Buchan's The 39 Steps

    A 3 page report on “The Thirty-Nine Steps” by John Buchan. No additional sources cited.

  • Poetic Explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose”

    In three pages, this poetic explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose” includes basic information on the poet and the poem, identifies the speaker, subject, and ideal, and also considers the poetic devices of imagery, simile, and metaphor. Two sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Hidden Self and Oscar Wilde

    A 6 page analysis of the theme of one's hidden self in three of Wilde's works: The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Importance of Being Earnest, and Lord Arthur Savile's Crime. The paper concludes that Wilde was desperately afraid of becoming ruined by public recognition of his homosexuality, and this fear is reflected in the emotional barriers erected within his fiction and plays. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

    A 6 page paper on Wilde's play in which the writer discusses the superficial vanities and prejudices of Victorian society. Important to this discussion is the meaning of 'Earnest' and in that sense, the title of this work. How Wilde uses wit and sarcasm to present relevant stereotypes and prejudices is well-explained. FREE outline included. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Comic Effects in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

    A 5 page paper which examines satirist Oscar Wilde's use of comic effects in his play, 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (1895).

  • Analysis of Waverley by Sir Walter Scott

    This 5 page paper examines the 1814 novel, Waverley, by Scottish novelist Sir Walter Scott. Specifically discussed is how the novel qualifies as romantic, in terms of definition and the author's medieval concept of the term. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Seamus Heaney's Poetry and Ghosts of the Earth

    A fifteen page paper looking at this Irish poet's views of the thin veil between life and death, as depicted in his works. The paper asserts that Heaney views the dead and the living, the past and the present, as occupying the same space. Bibliography lists fifteen sources, including seven poems of Heaney's.

 

Most Relevant Research Papers

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

 

Copyright © 2000-2022 The Paper Store Enterprises, Inc. & Fast Papers On-line.
All rights reserved. Search for your essay here.

U.S. based premium essay, research and
term papers service since 2000.