Research Papers on Classic Literature

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

  • Estates Satire and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

    This 6 page paper discusses Estates Satire and how Chaucer uses it in his poem.

  • Political Reflections in 'The Inferno' and Divine Comedy of Dante

    A 5 page overview of the primary structure and plot of this fourteenth century classic poem. Discusses the literary classification of the poem and the historical and political circumstances under which it was written. The author contends that while Dante’s work is influenced to some degree by the historical setting, it is not limited to a discourse on politics. “Inferno”, in particular, is considered the greatest medieval poem and holds many political as well as religious parallels. No additional sources are listed.

  • Ahab and Faustus, Deals with the Devil Seen in Melville and Marlowe

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the characters of Faustus, in "Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe, and Ahab, in "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville, essentially sell their souls to the devil. No additional sources cited.

  • Analyzing the Tragedy Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 5 page paper which examines what elements this work possesses which qualify it as a literary tragedy. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The 'Sir Patrick Spence Poem

    A 3 page essay that analyzes "Sir Patrick Spence," a medieval poem (author unknown) that was written in the twelfth century. The poet relates how Sir Patrick Spence set to see on the king's command and met with watery grave. The poem is a sea saga that is told in vivid images, which serve to connect the modern reader to the real human feeling of loss that is portrayed in the verse. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight' and Setting

    A 4 page paper which discusses the use of setting in the epic poem, and considers what physical or geographical settings are important, in what ways the setting helps to set the mood of the poem, what it reveals about character, and how various settings compare and contrast with each other. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Christianity in Beowulf

    A 6 page research paper/essay that discusses Christian symbols in the epic poem Beowulf. This poem has its origins in pagan culture, but it was recorded by a Christian scribe (Saupe 97). Therefore there are “overlays” that color the narrative with Christian religious meaning (Saupe 97). This examination of the Christian overlay of meaning in Beowulf attempts to discern if this Christian influence changes in the descriptions of Beowulf’s three quests, or remains uniform throughout. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Love in Geoffrey Chaucer's 'Parliament of Fowles' and 'The Book of the Duchesse'

    A 14 page research paper that argues that love plays a pivotal thematic role in two of Geoffrey Chaucer's greatest poems, The Book of the Duchesse and The Parliament of Fowles. While Chaucer is acknowledged as one of the greatest and most eloquent advocates of love in English literature, in these poems, he qualified his endorsement and dedication to love by placing it within certain institutional and societal boundaries. In The Book of the Duchesse, his elegy of consolation over the death of the Black Knight's lady is couched within the parameters established by the conventions of courtly love. Likewise, while the Parliament of Fowles is a love poem, Chaucer pictures love as susceptible to certain natural laws that should be meticulously followed. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • An Analysis of Virgil's Depiction of the Tragedy of Dido

    A 3 page essay that examines Book Four of Virgil's epic poem of Rome's founding, the Aeneid, which relates the tragic love of Dido for the epic's hero Aeneas. This section of the poem pictures the course of Dido's love in five stages, which range from her realization that she loves Aeneas to her suicide, as his ships sail away. Throughout this narrative, Virgil pictures love as the equivalent to disease, an external force that subverts attention from what it truly important in life, that is, one's responsibilities. The implication in the poem is that Aeneas, being male, is better able to keep a proper focus than is the hapless, lovelorn Dido. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparative Analysis of Homer's 'The Iliad' and 'The Odyssey'

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Homer's famous epic poems. The themes of the poems are discussed as well as what type of audience Homer might have written each piece for. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • A Discussion of Christian Elements in the Epic Poem Beowulf, and in the Character of Beowulf Himself

    This is a 10 page paper discussing Beowulf as a Christian and Christian elements in the poem “Beowulf”. Beowulf, written by an unknown author in 8th century England, tells the tale of a young hero, Beowulf as he defeats evil monsters in order to defend his people. He arrives in the story as one who is already well known for his victories over monsters and in addition, he is virtuous and good and benefits his victories in battle to the grace of God. He relates tales of how God calmed the seas in order for him to be able to see the sea monsters and slay them. When he is fighting the evil Grendel, a descendent from Cain, and Grendel’s mother, he asks that God give victory to the one He believes is the most good and believes that his victories would not have been successful without God’s assistance. Many pagan elements appear in the poem, such as monsters, which no doubt reflects the overall situation and conflict between the pagan and Christian religions which existed in England at that time. The heavy Christian influence in the poem however, is reflected in the Christian Beowulf overcoming the powerful pagan monsters. Overall, Beowulf the hero, and Beowulf the poem can both be considered Christian in their faith, symbolism and the elements of strength seen as rewards for Christian goodness and virtue. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Review of Homer's 'The Iliad'

    A 6 page book review that summarizes and analyzes aspects of this classic epic poem. The Iliad, by the ancient Greek poet Homer, is one of the greatest poetic epics in history. This poem has held readers in thrall for millennia as there is it is a grand tale of heroic adventure. As time has past, its allure has increased due to the fact that Homer's storytelling prowess opens a window for the modern reader that reveals another time, an ancient era, with its mores, customs, traditions, beliefs and lifestyle illustrated in the lives of the Greek and Trojan heroes. In accomplishing this, the Iliad reveals a pagan world whose orientation is quite different from the Western world known to the reader. Thematic content is also discussed. No additional sources cited.

  • Dante's 9th Circle/A Contemporary Vision

    A 5 page research paper that discusses Dante Alighieri's medieval masterpiece The Divine Comedy. The writer states that this poem is a profound statement on medieval theology, but is also a commentary by Dante on medieval society. These verses picture Dante, being led by the pagan poet Virgil, through Hell, Purgatory and Heaven. In Hell, i.e., The Inferno, Dante pictures meeting notorious sinners: some contemporary with his era; some from the past. This inspires the question of how the present day's most notorious compare to those whom Dante included in his epic poem. The writer discusses John Walker Lindh, Timothy McVeigh, Jeffrey Dahmer and the Unabomber in relation to where they would go in the Ninth Circle of Dante's vision of Hell. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • A Summary of The Song of Roland (Chanson de Roland)

    This 5 page report discusses the medieval poem 'The Song of Roland' or Chanson de Roland and summarizes the plot, describes the poem's characters and their roles, and briefly discusses the 'ideal' behavior of a knight, as well as chivalry in the middle ages of Europe. No additional sources cited.

  • History and 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page analytical essay that examines Homer's Iliad in terms of how the details of the poem reflect the culture and beliefs of Homer's era. The writer argues that the works of Homer, regardless of whether or not Homer actually existed or if his account of the Trojan War is historical accurate, definitely reflect the cultural concepts, beliefs, and worldview of the time in which these epic poems were composed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Estates Satire and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

    This 6 page paper discusses Estates Satire and how Chaucer uses it in his poem.

  • Political Reflections in 'The Inferno' and Divine Comedy of Dante

    A 5 page overview of the primary structure and plot of this fourteenth century classic poem. Discusses the literary classification of the poem and the historical and political circumstances under which it was written. The author contends that while Dante’s work is influenced to some degree by the historical setting, it is not limited to a discourse on politics. “Inferno”, in particular, is considered the greatest medieval poem and holds many political as well as religious parallels. No additional sources are listed.

  • Comparative Analysis of Homer's 'The Iliad' and 'The Odyssey'

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Homer's famous epic poems. The themes of the poems are discussed as well as what type of audience Homer might have written each piece for. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • A Summary of The Song of Roland (Chanson de Roland)

    This 5 page report discusses the medieval poem 'The Song of Roland' or Chanson de Roland and summarizes the plot, describes the poem's characters and their roles, and briefly discusses the 'ideal' behavior of a knight, as well as chivalry in the middle ages of Europe. No additional sources cited.

  • History and 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page analytical essay that examines Homer's Iliad in terms of how the details of the poem reflect the culture and beliefs of Homer's era. The writer argues that the works of Homer, regardless of whether or not Homer actually existed or if his account of the Trojan War is historical accurate, definitely reflect the cultural concepts, beliefs, and worldview of the time in which these epic poems were composed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Truth in Poetry

    A 5 page paper which examines three different things. The paper discusses the phrase “The truth shall set you free” as it relates to specific literature. The paper then discusses the meaning of William Blake’s comment “Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks of Religion,” and lastly the paper discusses a particular poem whose title and author is unknown. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Beowulf & Odysseus/Ancient Heroes

    A 6 page essay that contrasts and compares Beowulf and Odysseus. The sagas of these two heroes seem similar at first glance because the ancient epic poems that record their exploits both deal with heroic action, battles against monsters and similar feats of daring-do. However, a closer look at both the Beowulf poem and Homer's Odyssey shows that these tales are each products of the culture that produced them. Therefore, they reflect different cultures, different eras, and different beliefs about what it means to be a hero. No additional sources cited.

  • Gender in Beowulf

    A 3 page essay that discusses the role of women and gender in Beowulf, the Old English epic, is reflective the culture of Germanic tribes that invaded England during the early middle ages. A close examination of this poem shows that gender and women play a distinctive role in this tale of heroism. While Beowulf's focus is on the warrior ethos and what this entails, there is also the fact that the poem implies fear of female power, along with an overarching societal need to keep women in a properly subjugated role. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Greek Values in Homer's 'The Iliad'

    A 4 page essay that examines Greek values in the Iliad. In his epic poems, the Iliad and the Odyssey, the ancient Greek poet Homer praised numerous qualities and values. "Patriotism, heroism, loyalty, resistance to temptations, truthfulness, generosity, honesty and hospitality" are just a few of the virtues that "Homer praised and exalted" (Christian and Greek philosophy, 2003, p. 15). This examination of Homer's Iliad focuses on what this epic poem tells the modern reader concerning the importance of Greek values, specifically heroism, honor and solidarity, in Greek society. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Ancient Writings Like Epic of Gilgamesh and Ideology

    This 6 page paper looks at the Epic of Gilgamesh along with four ancient poems. These are compared and contrasted and similar themes are highlighted. There is a great deal of attention to religion and philosophy. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • "Political, Philosophical, Religious, Cultural, Social, Literary and Artistic Value of 'Poem of The Cid"

    4 pages in length. The philosophical, political, social, religious, cultural, literary and artistic values present in Poem of the Cid reflect the comprehensive nature medieval literature sought to project; that this tale is replete with detailed implications of each value speaks to the manner by which medieval literature served as a definitive – if not embellished – form of social statement. No additional sources cited.

  • 3 Women in Odysseus's Life in 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 4 page paper which examines the roles of these women in Odysseus’s life and how they affect the protagonist as well as the epic poem, “The Odyssey.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Epic Hero Status of Odysseus in Homer’s “The Odyssey”

    In seven pages this paper analyzes Odysseus’ status as an epic hero as depicted by Homer in his classical poem, “The Odyssey.” A comparison is also made with the epic hero status of King Gilgamesh in the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. There are no additional sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Fame, Fate and Destiny in “Beowulf”

    In four pages this paper examines the roles that fame, fate, and destiny play in the anonymous Germanic epic poem “Beowulf.” Three sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Analysis of Beowulf

    In six pages this paper examines the anonymously written Medieval epic in an analysis that includes the poem’s meaning; its prevalent themes; how these themes relate to the characters, to the writer, and to society; the association (or lack thereof) to Christianity and Paganism; and considers what Beowulf, Odysseus, and Jesus Christ might have in common in anything. There are no other sources listed in the bibliography.

  • The Epic “Beowulf”

    The Epic “Beowulf”: In three pages this paper discusses the major epic characteristics featured in the classic anonymously written Medieval classic poem “Beowulf.” Three sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Female Characters and Ancient Texts

    In four pages (and subdivided into Parts I and II, an analysis of ancient text passages (Plato’s Symposium and Phaedo, The Life of St. Pelagia the Harlot, Selected Poems by Constantine Cafavy, Daniel 12:1, and Virgil’s Georgics), and of female characters Diotima, Judith, and St. Mary the Harlot, and an examination of narrative similarities between Virgil’s Georgics (Book IV) and Book IV of Homer’s “The Odyssey” are presented. Five sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Dante, the Inferno, and the Question of Gender

    This 4 page paper discusses the way Dante treats gender in his poem, The Divine Comedy. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Battle of Frogs and Mice'

    This 5 page paper discusses the poem "The Battle of Frogs and Mice" and what it might mean for our age. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'The Odyssey' by Homer and Characters Penelope and Athena

    A 5 page paper which examines how the wife and the goddess influenced Odysseus, thus assuring their importance in the epic poem. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Comparing Wordsworth's 'Ode Intimations of Mortality' to Keats' 'Ode to a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page comparison of the literary genre of odes using the poems of two of the most noted poets of the romantic genre. Discusses the ode genre, distinguishing between irregular odes and regular odes. Emphasizes that while certain aspects such as structure differ in many respects between Wordsworth’s “Ode” and Keats’ “The Grecian Urn”, there are a number of commonalties between these presentations as well. No additional sources are listed.

  • 'Yvain' by Chretien de Troyes and Relationship Reciprocity

    A 5 page essay that analyzes the reciprocity of relationships in Chretien de Troyes' twelfth century epic poem Yvain, the Knight of the Lion. The writer argues that the message that these relationships transmit to the reader is that that give and take is necessary to the maintenance of society in general. No additional sources cited.

  • Epic Poem Beowulf Contemporary Retelling

    A 7 page paper which retells the epic poem in order to be more easily understood by contemporary readers. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'The Odyssey' by Homer and Sports

    A 6 page paper which examines why sports is important to the poem, and the role it played in defining the characters and their actions. No additional sources are used.

  • 'Fragment 93' by Sappho

    A 3 page research paper that examines Sappho's poem fragment 93. Sappho was innovative in directing the "new wave" of Greek lyrists to move from writing poetry that from the perspective of the gods and muses toward using the personal perspective of the individual. The writer argues that fragment 93 exemplifies her style. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • William Wordsworth and Geoffrey Chaucer

    An 8 page paper which discusses Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” and William Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Christian Dogma in Beowulf

    A 5 page essay that draws on the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf to argue that a close examination of the poem suggests that the Christian poet that set the tale of Beowulf to paper for the first time saw in this Germanic folklore the outlines of Christian dogma, with the consequent result that Beowulf fits the broadest parameters of a Christ-like figure, yet with undeniable pagan elements. No additional sources cited.

  • Pericles' Funeral Oration as Reported by Thucydides

    A 3 page essay that proposes a hypothetical speech as it might have been given by a member of the Athenian leadership council in reaction to Pericles' funeral oration. The writer argues that due to the fact that Pericles largely devotes his speech to praising the virtues of the Athenian city, painting their culture as the epitome of freedom and individuality, it would have been political suicide for any Athenian leader to dispute this magnificent example of patriotic rhetoric. No additional sources cited.

  • Antigone and the Tragic Flaw of Antigone and Creon

    A 3 page paper which examines the tragic flaw which led to the downfall of Antigone and Creon in “Antigone.” No additional sources cited.

  • Holy Grail's History

    A 7 page paper discussing the sources from which the theme of the Holy Grail was gathered, and how the theme has changed over time. Sources discussed include the Mabinogion, Chrétien de Troyes, Robert de Boron, the Perlesvaus, the Queste del Saint Graal, and Thomas Malory. Bibliography lists six sources.

  • The Influence of Ancient Literature on Dante's Writing

    This 5 page paper examines a variety of influences on Dante, such as The Old Testament and Aristotle's works. Several works by Dante are explored. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Samuel Johnson's The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia

    A 4 page paper which examines Samuel Johnson’s “The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia” as it relates to the society of his time, as well as the timeless theme of searching for happiness. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • History of Rasselas by Samuel Johnson

    This 5 page paper examines this work and looks at it in light of Aristotle's ideas. The concept of happiness is explored. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Ancient Literature on the Life's Meaning of Moral Order

    This 7 page report discusses three pieces of ancient literature -- Homer’s Iliad, Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, and Aeschylus’ Agamemnon -- as examples of the relationships that exist between humanity and the gods. Each of the stories demonstrate the fact that the gods are who will determine the outcomes of humans’ lives, regardless of what humans do. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Medieval Literature and Portrayal of Political Issues

    A 7 page paper which examines how two Medieval works offer us an examination of the political structure of the time period. Though the works do not directly discuss politics, they get a great deal of information across to the reader through such political examinations as gender, social class, and the issue of power. The stories examined are "Guigemar" by Marie de France and "Erec and Enide" by Chretien de Troyes. No additional sources cited.

  • Western Classical Literature and Women

    A five page look at the role women have played in Western literature from the Old Testament through the Greeks and Romans through the Middle Ages and early Renaissance to the Romantic era. Works discussed include the Bible: Homer's Iliad and Odyssey; Aeschylus' Agamemnon; Euripides' Medea; Virgil's Aeneid; Dante's Inferno; the works of Petrarch; Cervantes' Don Quixote; and Goethe's Faust. Bibliography lists two sources.

  • Literature's Classic Adventure

    This 5 page paper supports the thesis that adventure is included in many works because human beings thrive on conflict and would not be content with peace. Homer's Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid and Dante's Inferno are examined. The concept of adventure and justifications for inclusion are explored. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Classical Literature Compared

    A 5 page paper which examines these classical literary works converge, in terms of literature, philosophy and theology; their differences in viewpoints; and their central themes and highlights. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Medieval Literature and Common Themes

    This 6 page paper examines three works: Beowulf, The Song of Roland and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Three common elements for the stories are highlighted. One is that each contain elements of fantasy, another is that they all contain a great degree of human suffering, and finally, each of the stories contain characters that exhibit loyalty. No additional sources cited.

  • Medieval Literature and Male Role Model Challenging

    This is a 7 page paper discussing the works of Chaucer and Malory and their challenges to the male role model presented in medieval society and traditional literature by writers such as Aquinas. Where Chaucer wrote new works from the perspectives of powerful women, Malory wrote on the weaknesses of the heroic male figures of Lancelot and Arthur. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature Shifts During Medieval Times

    A 3 page paper which examines how the changes in society led to changes in literature in the Medieval times. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Development of English Literature from 'Beowulf' to Alexander Pope

    An overview of the development of English literature, including Beowulf, Chaucer, Milton, Donne,Jonson and Pope. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Portrayal of Women in Griselda by Boccaccio, Brothers Menaechmus by Plautus, and 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 4 page overview of the one-dimensional treatment of women in the literature of these time periods. This paper features a discussion of the depiction of Penelope from the Odyssey, the shrewd wife in “Brothers Menaechmus” and patient Griselda. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature, Identity and Character Revelations

    This 3 page paper discusses the technique of character revelation used by an author. Examples are given from the last books of The Odyssey as Odysseus reveals himself to Penelope. Quotes cited from the text. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Greek Literature as Reflective of Greek Culture

    This 3 page paper discusses the Greek culture as referenced by Plato in his Allegory of the cave. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature of the Medieval Period

    This 21 page paper addresses several different topics. The authors discussed are St. Paul (Romans and Galatians); Augustine (Confessions); Gospel of Mark; Boethius (Consolation); and Gregory of Tours (History of the Franks). The essay discusses: the education of each author; who may have rewritten their original document; defining evil; authors' perceptions of a heavenly kingdom; the authors' use of belief; why each of the authors considered himself a Roman; conflict. While most of the five authors are discussed under each topic heading, not all are. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Medieval Literature/Marie de France & Chaucer

    A 3 page research paper/essay that addresses 3 topics from medieval literature. The first page is on Marie de France and her lai "Lanval." The second page is on Chaucer's motivation in writing The Canterbury Tales and uses the example of the Prioress to argue that he used this novel to comment on his society. The third page discusses Chaucer's structure and influences in writing his masterpiece. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Medieval Law and Literature

    This 5 page paper examines several medieval laws and argues that they resemble literature, not legal documents. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Medieval Law and Literature in ‘Beowulf’

    In ten pages this paper examines how Medieval law manifests itself in the anonymously written epic ‘Beowulf’ with the focuses being the patriarchy, legal and moral duty established through patrilineal custom, the complex matter of inheritance, and the transition from Germanic customs and community obligation to Anglo law and order. One source is cited in the bibliography.

  • The Christian Influence in Medieval Literature

    This 4 page paper discusses the influence of Christianity on medieval literature by exploring "Beowulf," "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" and Dante. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Women in Ancient Literature and Now

    This 6 page paper discusses women in “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” “The Iliad” and “Antigone” and how they differ from women today. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Character of Mordred in Literature

    This paper consists of five pages and discusses how the character of Mordred has appeared throughout literature with the emphasis being on how he is portrayed by T.H. White in The Once and Future King. Seven sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • Literature of the Renaissance and the Works of Ben Jonson, Francis Bacon, and John Milton

    In six pages this paper examines Renaissance literature and discusses how these authors and their writings reflect this period and genre. Five sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • The “Journey Motif” in Literature

    This 6 page paper discusses various journeys, spiritual, psychological and physical, in several works of literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Romantic Literature with Fantastic Elements

    This 8 page paper explores the differences between fantastic and romantic literature, and how one can be found in the other without classifying the whole work as one of that genre. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Life's Big Questions

    An 8 page paper which examines different literature, theories, dramas, and perspectives concerning the nature of life itself in many different ways. The works of Shakespeare and Ovid’s “Metamorphoses” are among the literature discussed. No bibliography provided.

  • Sociopolitical Classes of Plato and Their Parallels

    A 15 page research paper that examines Plato's sociopolitical classes as outlined in the Republic and also his Theory of the Soul. This literature review, first of all, discuss Plato's theory of the soul and show how he extrapolates on this idea in the Republic to describe his conception of an ideal state. Then, a separate literature review examines the topic of social class within American society to determine if there are parallels between Plato's conceptualization of social class and current day American reality. Bibliography lists 16 sources.

  • Exercise in Dante's 'Inferno'

    This 3 page paper provides an example of how to approach a writing exercise that asks one to look at other literature and put characters into the different parts of hell designated by Dante. The literature used is Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Miller's Tale and Othello. No bibliography.

  • Dante's Hell and Characters

    A 5 page apper which examines where one would place various characters in classic/ancient literature in Dante’s Inferno. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Psychology of Characters in The Iliad

    A 7 page paper which examines the psychology of the characters in Homer’s The Iliad. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Piety, the Bible, Sophocles, and Plato

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares Plato's Euthyphro, Sophocles' Oedipus and the Book of Genesis, chapter 22. The writer points out that all of these works concern the perspective of ancient peoples on issues of piety, justice and the manner in which these issues intersect with religion. Examination of these texts shows that Sophocles and the author of Genesis agree that divine authority demands and deserves unquestioning obedience. However, Plato, in representing the philosophy of Socrates, presents a more ambiguous picture that emphasizes the unreliability of a purely religious foundation for issues of justice. Analysis of these positions shows that Plato's stance in Euthyphro is the most logical-- and just-- by modern standards. No additional sources cited.

  • Satan Imagery in 'Paradise Lost' by John Milton and The Bible

    An 8 page paper which compares and contrasts how these two literary works portray evil. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 4 Essays, Antigone, Bible Verses

    A 5 page research paper that consists of 4 separate 1.25 pages papers. Two are on Bible verses, one on Sophocles’ Antigone and 1 on a poem by Sappho. Each paper lists 3 sources in the bibliography.

  • Oedipus Rex, the Book of Genesis, and Destiny

    A 4 page paper which discusses how destiny plays a part in the Book of Genesis in the Bible and in the classic Oedipus Rex. No additional sources cited.

  • Chaucer, St. Luke, Aristophanes and Their View of Social Issues

    This 3 page paper discusses social issues as explored in the Bible, Chaucer and ancient Greek comedy. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Gilgamesh and Job

    A 3 page discussion of Gilgamesh, in the Epic of Gilgamesh, and Job, in the Book of Job from the Bible are heroic figures. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Medieval Theology in Dulcitius

    An 8 page research paper/essay on this medieval play. From a modern perspective, medieval drama is interpreted by the average person as being incredibly sexist and somewhat perverse in its intense focus on tortures that Christian martyrs, who are usually beautiful maidens, undergo for their faith. In her analysis of the plays of Hrotsvit, Colleen D. Richmond, assistant professor of writing and literature at George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon, argues that Hrotsvit's intentions are to help women redefine themselves and find empowerment within the framework of Christianity that allows them to subvert the domination of patriarchy. In other words, when viewed from a scholarly perspective, "Dulcitius," as well as the rest of Hrotsvit's plays, can be perceived in terms of constituting both social protest and medieval feminism. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Symbolism in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"

    This 4 page paper discusses the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," and argues that it can be seen as a struggle between paganism and Christianity, with the symbols of the green sash and the pentacle on Gawain's shield representing each of these theologies respectively. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Moral and Ethical Principles Learned from The Odyssey

    This 3 page paper discusses three moral and ethical ideas we can find in The Odyssey. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Herakles Presentation by Playwrights and Artists

    This 14 page paper examines the background of the Greek god Herakles and how this mythalogical figure is depicted in art. Additionally, this paper examines whether various pieces of art depicting Herakles depict a consistant image.

  • Timai, Aphrodite and Demeter's Homeric Hymns

    A 5 page assertion that these Homeric Hymns are exemplary of one particular stage in the evolution of the way the world viewed gods, religions, and mythologies. Contends that not only do these hymns provide a primary source of information about Greek religion and belief, their primary purpose is to explain how timai (power) was obtained by the Olympians. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Hamlet & Oedipus

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares the characters of Hamlet and Oedipus. Despite being separated by the passage of centuries, as well as differences in language and culture, Sophocles’ portrayal of Oedipus and Shakespeare’s depiction of Hamlet bear similarities, as well as the innumerable differences that one would expect. The similarities revolve around themes common to both plays, such as incest and the use of symbolism, while the differences largely involve the specifics of characterization. No additional sources cited.

  • Ahab and Faustus, Deals with the Devil Seen in Melville and Marlowe

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the characters of Faustus, in "Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe, and Ahab, in "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville, essentially sell their souls to the devil. No additional sources cited.

  • Epic Poem 'Beowulf' and Comparison of the Dragon and Grendel

    A 6 page paper which compares and contrasts two of Beowulf’s opponents and analyzes their symbolic significance. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Dragons

    (5 pp) No single continent or culture has an exclusive claim on dragons or dragon lore. The animals have survived in time and imagination. Just as an adventurer might claim land for his sovereign, a wise traveler would also know when dragons would be about, and then, even whisper to himself, "here be-- dragons." This discussion will allow the reader to learn of these marvelous creatures, so he too can learn to recognize them, and the places where they live. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Relationship Between the Goddess Athena and Odysseus in 'The Odyssey'

    Many have called the relationship between Athena and Odysseus in The Odyssey a mentoring relationship, particularly as Athena often takes the form of a character named Mentor, but their relationship has much more depth than mentoring. Theirs is a relationship that evolves from mistaken assumptions between two people, in this case, their roles in the battle of Troy, a role requiring the commitment of shared souls. Therefore, the relationship between Athena and Odysseus is a redemptive one borne of past grievances (storytelling focus). Athena’s need is to redeem the future, while Odysseus’s need is to redeem the past. Together, they fight to protect their present souls so that they can give birth to one soul containing the mortal and the immortal. Bibliography lists 3 sources. JVAthOdy.rtf

  • Athena and Juno in Homer and Virgil

    This 7 page paper explores the role of the goddesses Athena and Juno in “The Odyssey” by Homer and “The Aeneid” by Virgil. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Development of English Literature from 'Beowulf' to Alexander Pope

    An overview of the development of English literature, including Beowulf, Chaucer, Milton, Donne,Jonson and Pope. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Beauty, Competitiveness and Death in Snow White

    This 7 page analysis of Snow White suggests that beauty and age enter into the picture and explain the Queen's behavior. Beauty in society is evaluted. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Hell in Dante's 'Inferno' and Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus

    An 8 page paper discussing and comparing Christopher Marlowe’s “Dr. Faustus” with Dante’s “Inferno.” Dante predated Marlowe by three centuries, writing “The Divine Comedy” long before the Reformation and the rise of Protestantism that Marlowe followed. The religious teachings of the times in which these authors lived are reflected in the concept of each of the nature of hell. Dante’s character descends into it to discover its hierarchical spirals; Mephistophilis reveals to Faustus that he has not left hell at all in order to visit Faustus, that they are living in it. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Beowulf & Aeneas

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares Beowulf with Aeneas. Beowulf is the protagonist in an Old English epic of the same name by an anonymous poet. Aeneas is the protagonist in the ancient Roman epic of Virgil, the Aeneid. These two heroes each represent transitions in their societies. Beowulf provides the transition between a world terrorized by evil to one of peace. Aeneas provides the transition from the old world of Troy to the glory of the new world of Rome. In providing these transitions, each epic offers insight on the differing worldviews that each work represents, that is, the world of Roman values and the world of ninth century Germanic society. No bibliography is offered.

  • Dress as a Representation of Human Sexuality and Gender

    This 5 page paper discusses "Assaulted and Pursued Chastity" by Margaret Cavendish and "The Taming of the Shrew" by Shakespeare and how they use dress to represent human sexuality and gender relationships. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Journeys in Dante's 'Inferno' and Homer's 'Odyssey'

    A 5 page comparison and contrast of Homer's Odyssey and Dante's Inferno in relationship to the theme of their journeys.

  • The Franklin’s Tale: Courtly Love and Marriage

    A 3 page paper which examines how Chaucer’s Franklin’s Tale demonstrates and incompatibility between courtly love and marriage. No additional sources cited.

  • The Ambition of Lady Macbeth

    This 11 page paper examines Shakespeare's classic work. It is claimed that Lady Macbeth's ambitions take center stage as her husband is psychologically manipulated into committing a murder for the gain of the throne. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Gilgamesh, Sir Gawain, and Their Representation of Moral Values

    A 7 page paper which examines how Sir Gawain better exemplifies righteous living through good deeds and altruism, as opposed to Gilgamesh, who values only himself and is concerned only with self-reward. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Lysistrata and Pleasure

    This 4 page report discusses the ancient Greek comedy “Lysistrata” and how it serves as an example of how, throughout Greek drama, civil unrest is often defined and framed in terms of gender and sexual conflict. For example, female choruses, the Furies, male supremacy, female protest and incest have all been used as dramatic vehicles to convey a variety of issues, problems and disasters, including war and the subversion of traditional morality and values. In this way, the theater served as the primary forum for civic dialog among the ancient Greeks. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Comparing Princess Diana and Beowulf

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts Beowulf and Princess Diana. Both were heroes for they sacrificed aspects of themselves for the benefit of others. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Persuasiveness of Socrates in Plato's Apology

    This 5 page paper discusses the trial and defense put forward by Socrates, recorded by Plato. The paper argues that Socrates was highly persuasive and put forward attractive arguments, but it was unlikely he would have been found innocent given the background of his teachings and the recent history in Athens at the time of his trial. The writer discusses the background to the trial and looks at the approach taken by Socrates when he defends himself. The bibliography cites one source.

  • Yvain by Chretien de Troyes

    A 5 page analysis of de Troyes' tale on the subject of how pure love leads to transformation of the individual—where Yvain and other characters are representatives of both the personal soul and the community soul. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • A Summary of The Song of Roland (Chanson de Roland)

    This 5 page report discusses the medieval poem 'The Song of Roland' or Chanson de Roland and summarizes the plot, describes the poem's characters and their roles, and briefly discusses the 'ideal' behavior of a knight, as well as chivalry in the middle ages of Europe. No additional sources cited.

  • Characterization in Arabian Nights and Days

    This 5 page tutorial helps a student explore the characterization of Gamasa Al-Bulti. While this character is the focus of the paper, other aspects of the work are explored. No additional sources cited.

  • Love of Family and Homeland in Euripides' Medea

    5 pages in length. The relationship between love of homeland and love of family in "Medea" becomes as conflicting as does the relationship between the primary characters. However, this struggle to choose between person and place is not limited to just these two characters, but rather is apparent with nearly all of the characters who have speaking parts. Indicative of the play's inherent quest for balance between both entities, the writer discusses how it becomes clear that there is not room to accommodate one with the other, which forces the characters to sometimes make difficult decisions. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparative Analysis of Heart of Darkness and Ancient Mariner

    This seven-page-paper compares and contrasts Heart of Darkness , by Joseph Conrad and Ancient Mariner , by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Bibliography lists four sources.

 

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