Research Papers on British Literatureerature

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

  • Poetic Analysis of John Keats' 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page review of this classic work of iterature. The author of this paper reviews some of the deeper connotations which the poem suggests. As in many of his poems, Keats’ emphasizes the specific beauty of an object or person in relation with the beauty of the setting in which that object or person existed. The most profound, and indeed heavily debated pronouncement of the poem, however, is the observation that beauty is truth. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Eyes That Last I Saw in Tears' by T.S. Eliot

    A 6 page research paper/analysis of Eliot's poem "Eyes that Last I Saw in Tears." The writer argues that this poem conveys a haunting sense of regret, sorrow and, also, lingering guilt. The poem does not inform the reader as to why the memory of a look, the image of crying eyes, haunts the poet, yet an examination of this work clearly shows that this is what is taking place. Considering this fact, it seems logical to look at possible circumstances in Eliot's life that could have provided the impetus for this poem. By looking at both the poem and at certain known facts about Eliot's life, it is possible to find further illumination on the meaning of the poem from understanding the basis for Eliot's failed marriage. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Linguistic Analysis of Thomas Hardy's Poem 'Darkling Thrush'

    A 10 page linguistically oriented analysis of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush." The writer offers an examination of this poem that explores syntax, phonology, morphology, and lexicon/cohesion. Analysis addresses the poem line-by-line, sometimes word-by-word. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Mixture of Christianity and Paganism in 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (circa 1375-1400). The writer argues that this poem is an amalgamation of Christian and pagan elements, which are discussed and substantiated with quotes from the poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Wordsworth & Hardy/Perspectives on Nature

    A 3 page essay that observes that both William Wordsworth, in 1838, and Thomas Hardy, in 1900, wrote poems that were inspired by the beautiful song of the thrush. But while these two poems share a common topic, the Romantic approach and exuberant optimism of Wordsworth is quite different from the dark skepticism that characterized the Victorian worldview exemplified by Hardy. Nevertheless, examination of the two poems shows that each poet took inspiration and encouragement from the thrush, each in his own way. No additional sources cited.

  • Life and Works of Sylvia Plath

    An introduction to Plath's life and works, including a commentary on three of her poems, Daddy, Lady Lazarus and Morning Song.

  • Interpretation of 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot

    A 5 page essay that offer interpretation of Eliot's famous poem. The writer argues that Prufrock realizes that he has aged without ever really having lived and there is the suggestion at one point in the poem that he toys with the idea of asking a woman to marry him. He does not, however, do this because of his fear of rejection. As this suggests, Eliot's poem captures perfectly the psychic state of a shy, insecure person who feels trapped in a "hell" created by his social paralysis, which keeps him from ever doing anything, from ever really living, out of fear of looking foolish, as well as the fear of embarrassment that results from having tried and failed. As this suggests, examination of this poem shows how it is a psychological profile of a modern individual whose life is meaningless due to his internalization of what he feels is expected of him. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Portrayals of Good Science Gone Bad in Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, H.G. Wells, and Mary Shelley

    A 10 page overview of the factors which existed in the Victorian era to spawn such works as “The Island of Doctor Moreau” and “The Invisible Man”, “Frankenstein” and “Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde”. This paper describes the quest for understanding and scientific experimentation which captivated this era and speculates as to how this captivation extended to the literary world as well. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • The Creature as Frankenstein’s Victim

    This 5 page paper considers the classic novel Frankenstein and argues that the real victim of the doctor’s obsession is the Creature itself. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Knowledge Theme in 'Paradise Lost' by John Milton and Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 5 page research paper that examines the use of the theme of knowledge in Christopher Marlowe's late sixteenth century play, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, and John Milton's mid-seventeenth century epic poem, Paradise Lost,. The writer argues that each author addresses the issue of predestination and free will in determining the relationship of knowledge to God's will. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Characters in 'The Cook,' 'The Shipman,' 'The Doctor' and 'The Guildsmen' in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales

    This 5 page paper looks at the characters of the guildsmen, the Cook, the shipman and the doctor in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and how they are portrayed as negative characters. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • Analyzing the Tragedy Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 5 page paper which examines what elements this work possesses which qualify it as a literary tragedy. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe and Hamlet by William Shakespeare

    In five pages this comparative analysis considers how both protagonists regard redemption and how they are conflicted by their moral concepts of good and evil in these respective plays. There are no additional sources in the bibliography.

  • Ethical Considerations in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    A 5 page comparison of Victor Frankenstein himself with the Creature he made. The paper characterizes Dr. Victor Frankenstein as a portrait of all those scientific over-achievers who give no heed to the ethics of their experimentations, and Victor's Creature as the representation all those victims who have to live with the effects. Bibliography lists three sources.

  • The Culture of the Beowulf Poem

    A 7 page essay that analyzes the Old English epic poem Beowulf in regards to what the poem tells the modern reader about this culture. The writer discusses what sort of traits were admired by this culture, what they disdained, and what they considered to be the traits of good leader. No additional sources cited.

  • Wordsworth/Solitary Reaper

    A 4 page essay that offers summation and analysis of Williams Wordsworth's "The Solitary Reaper, a poem which offers a romantic view of what was undoubtedly a common sight during his lifetime for anyone traveling through the countryside--a person reaping the grain harvest on some rural farmstead. The context of the poem implies the everyday nature of this occurrence. However, Wordsworth's romantic vision teaches his reader to perceive this young woman, reaping and singing to herself, with new eyes and to consider how this ordinary scene was uniquely beautiful. No additional sources cited.

  • Christianity in Beowulf

    A 6 page research paper/essay that discusses Christian symbols in the epic poem Beowulf. This poem has its origins in pagan culture, but it was recorded by a Christian scribe (Saupe 97). Therefore there are “overlays” that color the narrative with Christian religious meaning (Saupe 97). This examination of the Christian overlay of meaning in Beowulf attempts to discern if this Christian influence changes in the descriptions of Beowulf’s three quests, or remains uniform throughout. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'And Death Shall Have No Dominion' by Dylan Thomas

    An 11 page research paper/essay that analyzes Thomas' poem "And death shall have no dominion." The writer argues that in this poem, it is not religion that Thomas honors, but the idea behind Christian dogma, which is that there is life from death-- an idea, which Thomas argues in his verse is self-evident in nature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Sonnet Uses of Hopkins

    A 9 page research paper/essay that analyzes four of Hopkins's poems in relation to how they demonstrate Hopkins' use of the sonnet form. The poems "God's Grandeur," "The Windhover," "As Kingfishers Catch Fire," and "Carrion Comfort" are explicated. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Infant Joy' and 'Infant Sorrow' Poems by William Blake

    A 4 page essay that discusses Blake's intentions with his poems Songs of Innocence and Experience. The writer explicates and contrasts "Infant Joy" and "Infant Sorrow" and also discusses both poems by Blake entitled "The Chimney Sweeper." No additional sources cited.

  • Blake and Wordsworth

    A 6 page essay that offers 2 3-page essays: one on William Blake’s “Chimney Sweep” poems and one on William Wordsworth’s “The World is Too Much With Us Late and Soon.” The writer in each case uses the poems to discuss each poet’s poetic philosophy and style. No additional sources cited.

  • W.B. Yeats/An Irish Airman Foresees His Death

    A 3 page essay that analyzes this Yeats poem. During World War I, millions of young men lost their lives. In his poem “An Irish Airman foresees his Death,” Irish poet W.B. Yeats explores why one particular young man, a pilot, engages in that awful conflict and how he views his death, which he knows is sure to come. The words that Yeats selects and the pilot’s manner of speaking tells the reader a great deal about how Yeats imagined this man’s character. No additional sources cited.

  • Poems of William Blake and Theodicy

    An 8 page paper which examines how the theme of theodicy is interwoven into Blake’s poetic works, “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience” such that the reading of a single poem can be influenced or altered by its relationship to other poems in the collection. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • 'Sonnet 54' in Amoretti by Edmund Spenser

    A 7 page paper that explicates Spenser's Sonnet 54. This close reading of the poem offers a line-by-line interpretation of the poem, discussion of its meter and rhyme scheme, and also Spenser's use of poetic devices. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • D.H. Lawrence/The Piano

    A 3 page research paper/essay that discusses this poem and D.H. Lawrence. It is something of a quandary for modern readers as to how to evaluate the poetry and fiction of D.H. Lawrence. Praised in previous eras, he has been castigated by many critics, particularly feminist theorists, who view his work through the lens of current sensibilities towards political correctness. The following discussion, first of all, reviews briefly how Lawrence has been viewed before evaluating his poem "Piano", which was completed in 1918. This analysis argues that when viewed as a product of Lawrence's time, i.e., this poem conveys the reality of male emotional experience rather than the Victorian preconceptions of his era. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Explication of 'London' by Poet William Blake

    A 3 page essay that explicates William Blake's poem London. The writer argues that Blake was frequently critical of English society in his poetry, subtly attacking many of the established institutions and cultural ideas of his era. In his poem "London," Blake paints a portrait of the city that depicts it has having fallen into moral chaos. Appalled at the suffering, poverty, prostitution and mistreatment of children, Blake's poem is scathing social commentary that was intended to open the eyes of the upper classes to the degradation of their society as a whole. London is also briefly compared to Blake's The Chimney Sweeper. No additional sources cited.

  • t.s. eliot's 'The Waste Land' and Maud Ellmann's 'A Sphinx Without a Secret'

    A 3 page essay that summarizes and discusses Maud Ellmann's "A Sphinx Without a Secret: The Waste Land," a critique of the poem by T.S. Eliot. Ellmann begins her discussion of T.S. Eliot's poem The Waste Land by comparing it to a phrase from an Oscar Wild's story, saying that the work is an example of a "sphinx without a secret" (Ellmann 258). In so doing, Ellmann begins her detailed and insightful examination of Eliot, which looks at this poem from a psychoanalytical perspective, which favors a post-structuralist reading of the text. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Ode to a Grecian Urn' and 'To Autumn' by John Keats

    A 7 page essay that analyzes Keats' "To Autumn" and "Ode to a Grecian Urn," with a primary focus on "To Autumn." It is Keats' rich use of language that pays tribute to this season. As the poem progresses, Keats piles up sensory images in much the same way as a farmer piles up his harvest. An examination of this poem, in comparison with another poem that exemplifies Keats' style, the famous "Ode to a Grecian Urn" reveals Keats' optimistic outlook, a perspective that found meaning in the ordinary events of life, as well as in great art. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Analysis of the Poem 'The Elixir' by George Herbert

    A 3 page explication of the poem featured in the 1633 collection of religious poetry, “The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations.” No additional sources are used.

  • Lord Byron, We'll Go No More A-Roving

    A 5 page research paper/essay that analyzes this poem by George Gordon, Lord Byron. A close examination of this poem and where it fits in Byron's life suggests a negative view of Bryon, both as a poet and as an individual. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • A Discussion of Christian Elements in the Epic Poem Beowulf, and in the Character of Beowulf Himself

    This is a 10 page paper discussing Beowulf as a Christian and Christian elements in the poem “Beowulf”. Beowulf, written by an unknown author in 8th century England, tells the tale of a young hero, Beowulf as he defeats evil monsters in order to defend his people. He arrives in the story as one who is already well known for his victories over monsters and in addition, he is virtuous and good and benefits his victories in battle to the grace of God. He relates tales of how God calmed the seas in order for him to be able to see the sea monsters and slay them. When he is fighting the evil Grendel, a descendent from Cain, and Grendel’s mother, he asks that God give victory to the one He believes is the most good and believes that his victories would not have been successful without God’s assistance. Many pagan elements appear in the poem, such as monsters, which no doubt reflects the overall situation and conflict between the pagan and Christian religions which existed in England at that time. The heavy Christian influence in the poem however, is reflected in the Christian Beowulf overcoming the powerful pagan monsters. Overall, Beowulf the hero, and Beowulf the poem can both be considered Christian in their faith, symbolism and the elements of strength seen as rewards for Christian goodness and virtue. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Hero and Leander/Marlowe

    A 4 page essay that discusses the homoerotic passages in Christopher Marlowe's sixteenth century poem Hero and Leander. No additional sources are cited.

  • Robert Browning's 'My Last Duchess'

    A 3 page essay that addresses Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess." This poem presents a dramatic monologue, in which a duke is discussing his art collection with the emissary of a family with whom the duke is negotiating the details of an arranged marriage. The duke stops before a portrait of his last duchess and begins to recount a story that is clearly intended to relay a message to the family concerning the duke's expectations for his next wife. In presenting the duke's diatribe against his previous duchess, Browning, in many ways, contrasts the restricted Classical worldview against the more humanistic Romantic worldview. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 2 Carpe Diem Poems

    A 4 page essay that explicates 2 carpe diem poems. Carpe diem, a Latin phrase meaning “cease the day,” is a favorite theme found in seventeenth century poetry. Two of the most famous carpe diem poems from this era are Robert Herrick’s “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” and Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress.” An examination of these poems indicates that while Herrick makes effective use of imagery in order to argue his carpe diem seduction theme, Marvell’s poem is the most effective. No additional sources cited.

  • Advancing Age in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats

    A 5 page essay that summarizes and analyzes 3 poems by Yeats. In three of his best poems, William Butler Yeats addresses the age-old topic of mortality and the bitterness of advancing age. These poems are "Among School Children," "Sailing to Byzantium," and "Byzantium." These three poems thematically share and develop Yeats' thoughts relative to the loss of youth and the decline and decay of the human body contrasted against what is eternal in human experience, which is the medium of art and the striving of the soul toward perfection. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Comparison of the Poems by Christina Rossetti and John Milton

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares works by Milton and Rossetti. John Milton (1608-1674), in his epic poem Paradise Lost, and Christina Rossetti (1830-1894), in her poem The Goblin Market, each present narratives in which women are tempted by sin that is represented allegorically by fruit. In each poem, there are also depictions of acts of love. But while these features indicate that the poems bear similarities, they also have fundamental differences that deal mainly with the poet's depiction of women. Eve is depicted as shallow, easily deceived and not capable of thinking as rationally as Adam. Rossetti's heroine, Lizzie, on the other hand, is clever, self-sacrificing, and saves her sister from sin through her actions. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and Imagery

    A 5 page essay that discusses Andrew Marvell's seduction poem "To His Coy Mistress." In this poem, Marvell (1621-1678) employs striking use of imagery delineates both the pleasure involved in "ceasing the day" (carpe diem) and the shortness of time, which is the philosophy's rationale. The first half of the poem employs imagery to establish a sense of intimacy between Marvell and his lover. The second half employs time imagery to focus on the point that life is short. Collectively, this argument makes this one of English literature's most persuasive seduction poems. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Dialogue between the Soul and the Body' by Andrew Marvell

    A 3 page essay that explicates Marvell's poem "A Dialogue between the Soul and the Body." In this poem, Marvell addresses the duality of human nature. Examination of Marvell's thought on this topic shows that he considers the perspective of the soul and the body to be contradictory. No additional sources cited.

  • Explication of George Herbert's "Virtue"

    A 4 page explication that describes George Herbert's early seventeenth century poem "Vertue" (Virtue). The writer explains how the main point of the poem is the immortality of the virtuous soul. No additional sources cited.

  • The Warrior Culture of Beowulf

    This 5 page research paper examines the Old English epic poem of Beowulf in terms of what the poem conveys about the warrior culture of the Germanic tribes that were the forebears of the English. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Parliament of Fowles' by Geoffrey Chaucer

    A 5 page paper that discusses the structure and thematic content of Geoffrey Chaucer's poem "Parliament of Fowles," which is one of the first Valentine's poems. The writer argues that Chaucer upholds love, but stresses that love should promote the "common profit," i.e. the common good. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Christian Allegory and 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

    A 5 page research paper, in which the writer argues that the traditional interpretation of "Mariner," which sees the poem as Christian allegory, comes closest to capturing its meaning. The writer also explores how the poem has been interpreted by various critics. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Comparison of Poems by Keats and Blake

    A 3 page essay that compares "La Belle Dame sans Merci" by John Keats with William Blake's "The Divine Image." The writer first addresses their similarities by showing how both poems reflect the characteristics of Romantic poetry, but then differences are addressed by outlining the themes of each poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • 'Ovid's Banquet of Sence' by George Chapman

    A 3 page essay that examines Chapman's sixteenth century poem "Ovid's Banquet of Sence." The writer discusses how Chapman assumed that his readers would be cognizant of numerous literary references and focuses on how Chapman's poem reflects Platonic ideals expressed by Diotima in Plato's Symposium. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of John Keats' 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page review of this classic work of iterature. The author of this paper reviews some of the deeper connotations which the poem suggests. As in many of his poems, Keats’ emphasizes the specific beauty of an object or person in relation with the beauty of the setting in which that object or person existed. The most profound, and indeed heavily debated pronouncement of the poem, however, is the observation that beauty is truth. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Eyes That Last I Saw in Tears' by T.S. Eliot

    A 6 page research paper/analysis of Eliot's poem "Eyes that Last I Saw in Tears." The writer argues that this poem conveys a haunting sense of regret, sorrow and, also, lingering guilt. The poem does not inform the reader as to why the memory of a look, the image of crying eyes, haunts the poet, yet an examination of this work clearly shows that this is what is taking place. Considering this fact, it seems logical to look at possible circumstances in Eliot's life that could have provided the impetus for this poem. By looking at both the poem and at certain known facts about Eliot's life, it is possible to find further illumination on the meaning of the poem from understanding the basis for Eliot's failed marriage. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Linguistic Analysis of Thomas Hardy's Poem 'Darkling Thrush'

    A 10 page linguistically oriented analysis of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush." The writer offers an examination of this poem that explores syntax, phonology, morphology, and lexicon/cohesion. Analysis addresses the poem line-by-line, sometimes word-by-word. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Mixture of Christianity and Paganism in 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (circa 1375-1400). The writer argues that this poem is an amalgamation of Christian and pagan elements, which are discussed and substantiated with quotes from the poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Wordsworth & Hardy/Perspectives on Nature

    A 3 page essay that observes that both William Wordsworth, in 1838, and Thomas Hardy, in 1900, wrote poems that were inspired by the beautiful song of the thrush. But while these two poems share a common topic, the Romantic approach and exuberant optimism of Wordsworth is quite different from the dark skepticism that characterized the Victorian worldview exemplified by Hardy. Nevertheless, examination of the two poems shows that each poet took inspiration and encouragement from the thrush, each in his own way. No additional sources cited.

  • Life and Works of Sylvia Plath

    An introduction to Plath's life and works, including a commentary on three of her poems, Daddy, Lady Lazarus and Morning Song.

  • Interpretation of 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot

    A 5 page essay that offer interpretation of Eliot's famous poem. The writer argues that Prufrock realizes that he has aged without ever really having lived and there is the suggestion at one point in the poem that he toys with the idea of asking a woman to marry him. He does not, however, do this because of his fear of rejection. As this suggests, Eliot's poem captures perfectly the psychic state of a shy, insecure person who feels trapped in a "hell" created by his social paralysis, which keeps him from ever doing anything, from ever really living, out of fear of looking foolish, as well as the fear of embarrassment that results from having tried and failed. As this suggests, examination of this poem shows how it is a psychological profile of a modern individual whose life is meaningless due to his internalization of what he feels is expected of him. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 2 Carpe Diem Poems

    A 4 page essay that explicates 2 carpe diem poems. Carpe diem, a Latin phrase meaning “cease the day,” is a favorite theme found in seventeenth century poetry. Two of the most famous carpe diem poems from this era are Robert Herrick’s “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” and Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress.” An examination of these poems indicates that while Herrick makes effective use of imagery in order to argue his carpe diem seduction theme, Marvell’s poem is the most effective. No additional sources cited.

  • Advancing Age in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats

    A 5 page essay that summarizes and analyzes 3 poems by Yeats. In three of his best poems, William Butler Yeats addresses the age-old topic of mortality and the bitterness of advancing age. These poems are "Among School Children," "Sailing to Byzantium," and "Byzantium." These three poems thematically share and develop Yeats' thoughts relative to the loss of youth and the decline and decay of the human body contrasted against what is eternal in human experience, which is the medium of art and the striving of the soul toward perfection. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Comparison of the Poems by Christina Rossetti and John Milton

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares works by Milton and Rossetti. John Milton (1608-1674), in his epic poem Paradise Lost, and Christina Rossetti (1830-1894), in her poem The Goblin Market, each present narratives in which women are tempted by sin that is represented allegorically by fruit. In each poem, there are also depictions of acts of love. But while these features indicate that the poems bear similarities, they also have fundamental differences that deal mainly with the poet's depiction of women. Eve is depicted as shallow, easily deceived and not capable of thinking as rationally as Adam. Rossetti's heroine, Lizzie, on the other hand, is clever, self-sacrificing, and saves her sister from sin through her actions. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and Imagery

    A 5 page essay that discusses Andrew Marvell's seduction poem "To His Coy Mistress." In this poem, Marvell (1621-1678) employs striking use of imagery delineates both the pleasure involved in "ceasing the day" (carpe diem) and the shortness of time, which is the philosophy's rationale. The first half of the poem employs imagery to establish a sense of intimacy between Marvell and his lover. The second half employs time imagery to focus on the point that life is short. Collectively, this argument makes this one of English literature's most persuasive seduction poems. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Dialogue between the Soul and the Body' by Andrew Marvell

    A 3 page essay that explicates Marvell's poem "A Dialogue between the Soul and the Body." In this poem, Marvell addresses the duality of human nature. Examination of Marvell's thought on this topic shows that he considers the perspective of the soul and the body to be contradictory. No additional sources cited.

  • Analysis of the Poem 'The Elixir' by George Herbert

    A 3 page explication of the poem featured in the 1633 collection of religious poetry, “The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations.” No additional sources are used.

  • Lord Byron, We'll Go No More A-Roving

    A 5 page research paper/essay that analyzes this poem by George Gordon, Lord Byron. A close examination of this poem and where it fits in Byron's life suggests a negative view of Bryon, both as a poet and as an individual. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Explication of George Herbert's "Virtue"

    A 4 page explication that describes George Herbert's early seventeenth century poem "Vertue" (Virtue). The writer explains how the main point of the poem is the immortality of the virtuous soul. No additional sources cited.

  • The Warrior Culture of Beowulf

    This 5 page research paper examines the Old English epic poem of Beowulf in terms of what the poem conveys about the warrior culture of the Germanic tribes that were the forebears of the English. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Parliament of Fowles' by Geoffrey Chaucer

    A 5 page paper that discusses the structure and thematic content of Geoffrey Chaucer's poem "Parliament of Fowles," which is one of the first Valentine's poems. The writer argues that Chaucer upholds love, but stresses that love should promote the "common profit," i.e. the common good. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Christian Allegory and 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

    A 5 page research paper, in which the writer argues that the traditional interpretation of "Mariner," which sees the poem as Christian allegory, comes closest to capturing its meaning. The writer also explores how the poem has been interpreted by various critics. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Comparison of Poems by Keats and Blake

    A 3 page essay that compares "La Belle Dame sans Merci" by John Keats with William Blake's "The Divine Image." The writer first addresses their similarities by showing how both poems reflect the characteristics of Romantic poetry, but then differences are addressed by outlining the themes of each poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • 'Ovid's Banquet of Sence' by George Chapman

    A 3 page essay that examines Chapman's sixteenth century poem "Ovid's Banquet of Sence." The writer discusses how Chapman assumed that his readers would be cognizant of numerous literary references and focuses on how Chapman's poem reflects Platonic ideals expressed by Diotima in Plato's Symposium. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Browning's Last Duchess & Her Fatal Misstep

    A 3 page essay that discusses Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess" and how this applies to the concept of "hamarita." The literary term "hamarita" has been defined simply as a "tragic flaw," however, it does not necessarily refer to flaw in character, as it can also be an "unwitting, even a necessary, misstep in doing rather than an error in character" (Literary Vocabulary). In Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess," it is made clear that the duke's last duchess did, indeed, take a fatal misstep that brought about her demise and that action consisted, not in a character defect, but in the fact that she was too good, too caring, too human, to be a proper aristocrat in the eyes of her husband. Her hamarita lay in her love of life and individuality, which prevented her from existing solely as just one more beautiful possession belong to the duke. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Time Perceptions in Poetry

    A 4 page explication of four poems dealing with the passage of time: "Sonnet 18"/Shakespare, "Sonnet 75"/Spencer, "The Soote Season"/Howard, and "My Galley"/Wyatt, the Elder. The writer argues that human beings are the only creatures aware of their morality and that this has influenced artistic expression since the dawn of history. This examination of four sixteenth and seventeenth century poets demonstrates that while the topic is universal, the artistic slant of individuals can vary considerably, as the tone of these poems ranges from the morose to the hopeful. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift' by Jonathan Swift

    A 4 page essay that analyzes Jonathan Swift's poetic commentary on his own death. Swift (1667-1745) is one of the greatest satirists of all time. His wit and critical viewpoint of society did not exclude himself as a topic. In his poem "Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift," he addresses how he imagines his own decline, death and the response of his so-called friends and public. The underlying theme in this poem is that profuse shows of concern and compassion serve to cover the basic self-interest of the individual, who is enormously glad that the sufferer is not himself. Likewise, Swift lampoons his own reactions to the success of others. Examination of this work shows how Swift uses the symbol of pride to point out the follies inherent in human behavior. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Julia's Petticoat by Herrick

    A 3 page explication of "Julia's Petticoat," by seventeenth century poet Robert Herrick. The writer argues that Herrick creates a seduction poem that uses the extended metaphor of his love's petticoat as an elaborate and poetically lyrical way of referring to the sexual allure of the woman who wears it. Examination of the poem shows that Herrick focuses on the effect that this undergarment has on the poet as he finds it suggestive of the woman's beauty and allure, so much so that the occasional glimpse of petticoat seems to excite him as much as the woman herself. No additional sources cited.

  • How Baumer and Kantorek in All Quiet On The Western FrontWould Respond to the poem The Next War by Robert Graves

    4 pages in length. The writer briefly discusses how Baumer and Kantorek would respond to Robert Graves' poem "The Next War." Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Marvell/To His Coy Mistress

    A 3 page essay that explicates this poem by Andrew Marvell, the seventeenth century British poet, in which Marvell makes a carpe diem argument that his mistress should throw caution to the wind and surrender her virginity because life is short and they will grow old and die within a heart beat. No additional sources cited.

  • European Difficulties to Transform from Pagan to Christian in the Poems "Song of Roland" and "Beowulf"

    In four pages this paper examines these anonymously written German and French poems to analyze the struggles Europe underwent to transform itself from a pagan to a Christian culture during the Middle Ages. Three sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • The Happy Fault in Paradise Lost

    This 3 page paper discusses the “happy fault” in Paradise Lost, and how it relates to Milton’s purpose in writing the poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Eighteenth Century Analysis of Poems "Little Black Boy" by William Blake, "Holy Willie's Prayer" by Robert Burns, and "We Are Seven" by William Wordsworth

    In four pages this paper contrasts and compares the style and poetry of each of these eighteenth century British poems. Three sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • 'The Tables Turned' by William Wordsworth and Romanticism

    A 2 page paper that defines Romanticism as expressed in William Wordsworth's 1798 poem The Tables Turned. Also briefly discussed is the influence Romanticism exerted on the political and religious thinking of the early nineteenth century. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock/Eliot

    A 3 page essay that offers explication of T.S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock." The writer discusses how love and romance are envisioned in the poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The World is Too Much with Us/William Wordsworth

    A 3 page explication of William Wordsworth's poem "The World is Too Much With Us," which focuses on Wordsworth's use of imagery and metaphor. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Philosophy of Negative Capability in the Poems of John Keats

    In four pages this paper examines how Keats used technique to employ his philosophy of negative capability in some of his most famous poems. Two sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • E.M. Forster's Novel A Passage to India and Walt Whitman's Poem 'Passage to India' Analyzed

    A 5 page paper which examines how Forster’s novel reacts to the assertions in Whitman’s poem. No additional sources are used.

  • Carpe Diem Poems by Herrick and Donne

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares Herrick's poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" and Donne's "The Flea." The writer argues that both poets make use of the carpe diem them to create seduction arguments. No additional sources cited.

  • 'In Memoriam' by Alfred Lord Tennyson and its 'Spring Songs'

    This 4 page report discusses the “spring songs” of the poem’s sections 38, 83, 91 and 115. In each, Tennyson discusses the return of spring, the possibility of rebirth, and a measure of hope and reassurance. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Geoffrey Chaucer's 'The House of Fame' and its Dream Sequence

    This 5 page report discusses Geoffrey Chaucer’s poem “The House of Fame” and its dream sequence. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • 'First Follow Nature and 'An Essay on Criticism' by Alexander Pope

    This 4 page report discusses a section of Pope’s An Essay on Criticism (published in 1711) that is often thought of as a poem in itself and referred to as “First Follow Nature” (lines 68 through 87). Also addressed is the importance and meaning of nature in 18th century English poetry and thinking. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • First World War and its Psychological Impact

    This 4 page paper examines two works. One is a book entitled Regeneration and the other is a poem entitled How to Die. Each examines the difficulties to emanate from World War One. No additional sources cited.

  • Love Poetically Approached by John Donne

    A 10 page paper which examines how Donne represents love in his poems, divine works and sonnets. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'The Bait' by John Donne

    A 3 page analysis of this English poem. “The Bait” is a love story, a tale of two wayward souls which are briefly pulled together by a man’s infatuation with a woman. Interwoven in “The Bait”, however is a unique blend of tangible reality and metaphysical abstraction. This paper examines the metaphysics and symbology employed by the poet. No additional sources are listed.

  • Christian Dogma in Beowulf

    A 5 page essay that draws on the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf to argue that a close examination of the poem suggests that the Christian poet that set the tale of Beowulf to paper for the first time saw in this Germanic folklore the outlines of Christian dogma, with the consequent result that Beowulf fits the broadest parameters of a Christ-like figure, yet with undeniable pagan elements. No additional sources cited.

  • Bram Stoker's Dracula and Kate Chpin's The Awakening Compared

    A 10 page research paper/essay that examines Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening (1899) and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). The writer argues that these works provide readers with vastly different conceptualizations of fantasy, sexuality and race. Chopin addresses the negative consequences of a woman's sexual awakening and her eventual suicide to escape the restrictions of Victorian society on female life. Stoker creates a fantasy in which an Eastern European monster preys on innocent English women and children. Examination of these two works shows that while these two authors each address common themes, they do so from diametrically opposed positions. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • How Eighteenth Century London Society Was Shaped by the Role of Women in 'The Rambler,' 'Evelina' and 'Moll Flanders'

    14 pages in length. There has rarely been a time in the history of mankind that women have not had to struggle in order to assert their worth as a gender. From the time when males first declared patriarchal authority over their female counterparts, women have fought – in various ways and with various results – to be treated both equitably and respectfully. Literature has long reflected this perpetual struggle between the genders, most often taking the side that support patriarchal control; however, a slow but steady change began occurring in eighteenth century London society that helped nurture a growing metamorphosis, which included Samuel Johnson 'Rambler' (Misella), Daniel Defoe's 'Moll Flanders' and Frances Burney's 'Evelina: Or, the History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World.' Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • The Virgin and the Gipsy by D.H. Lawrence

    This 4 page report discusses the theme of desire in the 1930 novella 'The Virgin and the Gipsy.' No additional sources cited.

  • Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence

    ( 5 pp.) Thesis: Sons and Lovers, is an excellent title for D.H. Lawrence's 1913 story of an unaware mother's emotional enmeshment with her youngest son. This is the story of a family with four children: three sons and one daughter. We see how the family inter-relates to each other, particularly a mother to her sons. We are also shown how interdependency becomes an entangled web between an unaware mother and her youngest son. We will look at those relationships in light of our thesis, how a mother chooses to give more value to her needs than that of her son.

  • Short Story Comparisons of 'Tickets, Please' by D.H. Lawrence and 'Regret' by Kate Chopin

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of loneliness as presented in both stories. No additional sources are used.

  • Literary Comparison of Graham Greene's 'The Destructors' and D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner'

    A 5 page paper (4-1/2 pp. + ½ pg. outline) which compares and contrasts each story’s plot, characters’ emotions and feelings, setting and mood, authors’ purposes (whether to entertain, satirize, realistically portray a life problem, analysis of emotions and responses, communicate a moralistic message), and the authors’ styles. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Flawed Hero Victor Frankenstein

    This essay tries to answer the question of whether Victor Frankenstein, in the Mary Shelley classic novel, acted heroically or was a flawed human being; a question that literary critics and analysists have attempted to answer for decades. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Depiction of Women in D.H. Lawrence's Women in Love and James Joyce's Ulysses

    This is an 11 page paper discussing the portrayals of women through the characters of Molly in “Ulysses” by James Joyce and Ursula in “Women in Love” by D.H. Lawrence. Both Joyce and Lawrence intended to disrupt the current restrictive roles held by women in society. Joyce’s Molly provided a complete reversal of womanhood and took on a manlike perspective in her actions, words and infidelity. Lawrence’s Ursula however, maintained her independent thoughts and actions as a woman while attaining equality within her relationship and marriage. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Social Transgressions in D.H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers

    A 9 page discussion of the odd circumstances portrayed in this early twentieth century novel depicting the life of young Paul Morel. Lawrence treads on societal prohibitions when he presents the graphical account of the odd relationship which existed between his protagonist and his mother. He does so not because he wants to harness the “shock factor” in order to captivate a reading audience but because he wants to explore the most primal aspects of mankind’s nature.

  • Human Nature and Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

    This 5 page report discusses Conrad’s best-known work and its many layers which ultimately presents a variety of shades of darkness. Not only are there the human conflicts and measures of darkness but there are also social implications presented in terms of the conflict that takes place between what is lawful and what is against the law (morally, logically, and legally), self-restraint compared to personal and uncontrolled self-indulgence and at the core of all that, the conflict between order and chaos. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Sexual Politics in Women in Love, The Rainbow, and Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence

    An 8 page paper which examines the male-centered aspects of the controversial novelist’s sexual politics, which was defined by feminist Simone de Beauvoir as “phallic pride.” Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • 'The Man Who Died' by D.H. Lawrence

    This 4 page paper examines this early Lawrence story that was originally entitled The Escaped Cock. The significance of the original title as well as the repetitive nature of the phrase "the man who died" are each discussed. The story is also analyzed in a more general sense. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Chancellors A History Of The Leaders Of The British Exchequer, 1886-1947 by Roy Jenkins

    12 pages in length. Roy Jenkins' purpose for penning The Chancellors: A History of the Leaders of the British Exchequer, 1886-1947 was not so much to chronicle the political contributions of each of the nineteen men who held office during this particular period; rather, the author chose a more personal approach as a means by which to portray the psychological and political components of each protagonist. Unlike similar accounts on the subject, Jenkins employs a significant sense of humor, not-so-subtle irony and rather unflattering perspective of what he calls a disparate lot of British Chancellors who had no more in common with one another than somewhat more than average ability and substantially more than average ambition. Indeed, The Chancellors' essays do not represent the typical and stuffy account of history's British moneymen. No additional sources cited.

  • Two Versions of Frankenstein

    This 7 page paper compares the novel with the 1931 film directed by James Whale. It argues that the novel is philosophical while the film is a horror classic; it also argues that the Monster can be seen as being symbolic of the status of women in society at that time. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century British History and Authors

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the authors, as well as poets, of Britain during the 17th and 18th century not only reflected the time periods but also influenced them. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia by Samuel Johnson and Obsession

    This 5 page paper argues that this book, which is usually seen as a story about the choices of life, may be more accurately interpreted as illustrating the obsession of the main characters. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • Analyzing 'The History Man' by Malcolm Bradbury

    This is a 10 page paper analyzing Malcolm Bradbury’s “The History Man”. “The History Man” (1975) by Malcolm Bradbury was considered by many an introduction to a new genre called “the campus novel”. The novel explored the academic and personal life of the main character, Howard Kirk, and his colleagues and students as the charismatic teacher taught his sociological perspectives on life and developed a certain scoundrel reputation as a manipulative and exploitive instructor in the satire fun-filled novel. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Relationships Between Men and Women in Literature and Throughout History

    An 8 page research paper that examines how historical sources and literature have portrayed male/female relationships. The writer specifically examines this topic in regards to marriage in the nineteenth century. Literary sources discussed are A Doll's House, The Awakening and Jane Eyre. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • History Plays of William Shakespeare

    An 8 page research paper that discusses Shakespeare's ten history plays constitute a substantial portion of his canon. The main body of these plays cover the years 1398 to 1485, with two additional plays, King John and Henry VIII, forming, respectively, a prologue and an epilogue to this period (Sen Gupta 55). These eight plays offer a survey of English history that begins in the last years of the reign of Richard II and end with the death of Richard III. The following survey of Shakespeare's history plays looks at where they fit in the Shakespeare's conception of English history and their historical accuracy. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • English Literature of the 17th Century

    A five page paper which looks at a variety of seventeenth century English writers and the way in which they use satire, irony and caricature to effect social and political comment. Bibliography lists 9 sources

  • Literature and the Nature of Good vs. Evil

    A 10 page analysis that examines five classics from British literature and how these works characterize the struggle between good and evil. The works profiled are: Macbeth, Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde, Heart of Darkness, Fellowship of the Ring and A Christmas Carol. No additional sources cited.

  • British Literature 18th vs. 19th Century

    A 9 page essay comparing 18th and 19th century literature. Writer describes themes, styles, and their relevance to the changing times. Most works discussed are by English authors including Chaucer, Defoe, and so forth. Bibliography lists 4 primary sources.

  • Literature of the Late Eighteenth Century and Humanism

    A 7 page research paper that examines the way the themes of nature and humanism in late 18th century and how this reflects a natural progression from earlier eras. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Propaganda and Literature Relating to British Imperialism

    The literature of Imperialist England included themes based on social Darwinism, the crisis of faith, imperialism, poverty and progress. This 7 page paper explores the issues in Milton's Paradise Lost; Behn's Oroonoko and Swift's Gulliver's Travels that pertain to the cultural context of the British Empire. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Historic British Literary Heroes

    This 5 page paper looks at how heroes are portrayed in literature, with an emphasis on British literary periods. Eras discussed include the Renaissance period and the Anglo-Saxon period. Several well-known works are mentioned such as Hamlet, Gulliver's Travels and Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • British Literature's Mainstream Tradition and Peripheral Culture

    A ten page paper which looks at the mainstream tradition in British literature and the way in which peripheral culture and literature is gradually being redefined, particularly with reference to the works of such writers as Chinua Achebe and Derek Walcott. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Child and Adult Voices in Literature for Children

    A nine page paper which looks at the significance of the adult and child voice in three works of children's literature: Alice in Wonderland, Little Women and The Secret Garden. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Eighteenth Century British Literature and Women

    This 8 page paper discusses the role of women in 18th century British literature. This paper refers to "Evelina" and "Roxana". Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf and its Literary Contribution

    A 5 page paper which examines Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse” as it contributed to literature. No additional sources cited.

  • The Search for Jon Winthrop in The Puritan Dilemma

    A 10 page paper discussing the examination of a concluding statement of the author: '...the broader vision that Winthrop stood for could never be wholly subdued. No Puritan could be a Puritan and remain untouched by it, for it arose out of the central Puritan dilemma, the problem of doing right in a world that does wrong.' The paper examines that Puritan dilemma, particularly in the light of Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson, with emphasis on the personal searches of John Winthrop. All references to the Bible are NIV. No other sources cited.

  • Connection Between Friday and Crusoe in Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

    A 6 page paper which first considers Crusoe’s early relationship with a Moorish boy named Xury, and how this parallels the subsequent relationship between Crusoe and Friday in an attempt to determine whether Friday follows Crusoe because he loves him, fears him, or a combination of both. Specifically considered are Crusoe’s rescue of Friday, their discussion of theology, Friday’s father, the duo’s journey to Europe, Friday’s death, and how this parallels Crusoe’s earlier relationship with Xury, and how both relate to events in world history such as Christianity, colonialism and slavery. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Psychological Conditions

    A 10 page analysis of Robert Louis Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" as it relates to psychological conditions. Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Early Modern Culture and Dr. Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 7 page research paper that examines the connections between Christopher Marlowe's play and the early modern period in which it was written. The writer discusses the ways in which the play reflects the thinking and theology of this period. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Development of English Literature from 'Beowulf' to Alexander Pope

    An overview of the development of English literature, including Beowulf, Chaucer, Milton, Donne,Jonson and Pope. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Different Interpretations of Biblical Events Lord Byron's View of the Story of Cain and Abel

    This 4 page paper discusses and compares the Holy Bible's Genesis to Byron's depiction of the events of Genesis. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature of the First World War, Dying, Mutilation, and Death

    A 7 page essay that examines the work of 5 WWI British poets and also Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises. The writer argues that this literature recounts the horrors of war through subtext, that is, not stating observations overtly. Subtext, expressed through metaphor, satire and allusion, provides the motivational engine that propels these works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'Good Men' Literary Comparison

    This 6-page paper analyzes John Wiltshier in "The Beach of Falesa" and Robert Chiltern in "An Ideal Husband" to determine how these two men becomes conflicted throughout their story.

  • Eighteenth Century Literary Satire in the Works of Daniel Defoe and Jonathan Swift

    A 6 page paper which examines the use of satire in literature during the 18th century. The authors examined are Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Twentieth Century British Experimental Literature

    A paper which considers the move away from traditional literary forms and towards the experimental in British literature of the mid-twentieth century, with particular reference to Woolf's To The Lighthouse and Beckett's Happy Days.

  • Graham Greene's The Destructors and D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner'

    A paper which compares and constrasts these two stories, with particular reference to the psychology of the main characters, the dynamics of the relationships which they establish with others, and the underlying tragic themes of the two narratives. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Restoration to Victorian Age British Literature

    This 3 page paper is a brief overview of the development of British literature from the restoration starting in about 1660, to the end of the Victorian age in 1901. The paper looks at the development of styles, content and presentation and cites numerous authors to illustrate the points raised. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • Questioning the Past in Literature of the Enlightenment

    A 4 page essay that discusses how Enlightenment literature was different from what had come before it. While the Enlightenment looked to the classical past for inspiration, its neoclassicism endeavored to find a balance with the desire to conserve against the desire to obtain independence and its own identity (Gay, 1969). This orientation can be seen clearly various works of Enlightenment writers, such as Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literary Religious Themes, Symbolism, and Imagery

    Religious imagery, symbols and thematic developments are common in the literature of a number of eras, including the literature of the early 20th century. This 5 page paper outlines these elements in E. M. Forster, in his novel Maurice, and Jeannette Winterson, in Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • British Literature of the Seventeenth Century Examined

    This 5 page paper examines the writings of Johnson, Marvell, Donne, Milton, Herrick and Herbert and describes an essential conflict that all six of them addressed. It then uses that conflict to describe the ways in which these writings depart from contemporary world views. Finally, the relationship between the essential conflict and various philosophical constructs is discussed. Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • Revenge as a Theme in Literature

    This 6 page paper compares the way in which the revenge theme is handled by Shakespeare in Hamlet, Poe in "The Cask of Amontillado" and Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess." Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Sutton Hoo and its Relationship to Literature

    This 7 page paper examines this famous burial ground and looks at its significance. Literature found at the site is duly noted but its inspiration on later literature and its confirmation of literature of the day are issues explored. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Medieval Literature/Marie de France & Chaucer

    A 3 page research paper/essay that addresses 3 topics from medieval literature. The first page is on Marie de France and her lai "Lanval." The second page is on Chaucer's motivation in writing The Canterbury Tales and uses the example of the Prioress to argue that he used this novel to comment on his society. The third page discusses Chaucer's structure and influences in writing his masterpiece. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Doyle & Gaskell/Victorian Literature

    A 10 page paper that consists of two 5-page papers. The first discusses Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Bakervilles in terms of he used the concept of mystery. The writer asserts that Doyle's creation of Holmes ushered in this genre into popular consciousness. Its bibliography lists 2 sources. The second 5-page paper is on Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton and the concept of industrialization, which the writer relates to class bias and the Victorian ideas on cleanliness. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Female Influence on British Literature

    A 7 page discussion of several of the female British authors that have influenced literature and society. This paper includes Mary Shelly, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Agatha Christie, Virginia Woolf, Jane Austen, Margery Allingham, and Elizabeth Gaskell. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Satire and Irony in Political Literature

    This 3 page paper examines Past and Present, The Communist Manifesto and Erewhon. Some quotes are included. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Shakespeare’s Influence in English Literature and Language

    This 10 page paper discusses Shakespeare’s influence on the English language and literature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • If Shakespeare Wrote Science Fiction, Ariel Would Use a Transporter

    This 4 page paper discusses five short science fiction stories and what it is about each of them that classifies them as being in that genre. It also suggests ways in which Shakespeare could use science fiction techniques and themes to rewrite his play “The Tempest” as a screenplay for Spielberg to direct. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Character of Mordred in Literature

    This paper consists of five pages and discusses how the character of Mordred has appeared throughout literature with the emphasis being on how he is portrayed by T.H. White in The Once and Future King. Seven sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • The Treatment of Women in Literature

    This 5 page paper looks at the way the representation of women has evolved throughout literature, from “Frankenstein” in 1818 to “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,” published in 2005. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature of the Renaissance and the Works of Ben Jonson, Francis Bacon, and John Milton

    In six pages this paper examines Renaissance literature and discusses how these authors and their writings reflect this period and genre. Five sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Showalter, Culture and Literature

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Elaine Showalter's A Literature of Their Own, which offers a challenge to the narrowness of the traditional canon of what is considered to be valuable contributions by women to English literature. In so doing she directly addresses the way in which culture has had an influence on women's literature. Showalter's theoretical perspective presents women's writing in terms of being a subculture, which evolved in direct reaction to the elements in mainstream patriarchal culture that tended to trivialize women's experience and role in society. No additional sources cited.

  • The “Journey Motif” in Literature

    This 6 page paper discusses various journeys, spiritual, psychological and physical, in several works of literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Narrative in Literature and Film: Frankenstein vs. Frankenstein

    This 6 page paper discusses the differences in the novel and film versions of “Frankenstein” from the point of view of narrative structure. Bibliography lists 6 sources

  • Romantic Literature with Fantastic Elements

    This 8 page paper explores the differences between fantastic and romantic literature, and how one can be found in the other without classifying the whole work as one of that genre. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • British Literature Before the 19th Century

    This 5 page paper discusses pre-19th century British literature (Swift, Pope, More, Langland and Bunyan) and why their satirical and allegorical works are important in their society. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Conrad, Condorcet and Achebe

    A 4 page paper which examines Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Condorcet’s essay The Future of Human Progress and Chinua Achebe’s Image of Africa. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Violence - the Monster that Torments Society Examined in Literature

    This paper uses four literary works to argue that violence is endemic in society. Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, War Child and How to Tame a Wild Tongue are used to give various examples of violent behavior. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Kipling and Kincaid/Perspectives on Colonialism

    A 6 page essay that uses Kipling "The White Man's Burden" and Kincaid's A Small Place to discuss the different orientations on colonialism taken by Victorians and post-colonial writers. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature Sampler

    This 10 page paper discusses four different fictional works, including two plays, Macbeth and The Hairy Ape, and two short stories, The Necklace and The Cabuliwallah. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

 

Most Relevant Research Papers

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

 

Copyright © 2000-2021 The Paper Store Enterprises, Inc. & Fast Papers On-line.
All rights reserved. Search for your essay here.

U.S. based premium essay, research and
term papers service since 2000.