Research Papers on American Literature

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

  • Adultery in The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    5 pages in length. Intolerance towards acts of adultery was alive and well, historically, during the period of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. The sexual repression and hypocrisy that reigned during the seventeenth century -- as compared with the more relaxed attitudes of today -- was evident within the Puritan culture. The writer addresses such sexual imprisonment as it relates to the mentality of that time. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Society and the Individual in The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

    A 5 page paper showing how the theme of the individual in society is portrayed within William Faulkner's novel. The paper points out that the characteristics of the individual family members illustrate the varying ways in which our search for self-worth in society at large can go awry. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Water Appeal in Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 5 page paper looking at the motifs of ocean and river in these two works by Kate Chopin and Mark Twain, respectively. The paper traces these motifs through the two novels, and suggests symbolic explanations for their tremendous power. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Water Appeal in Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 5 page paper looking at the motifs of ocean and river in these two works by Kate Chopin and Mark Twain, respectively. The paper traces these motifs through the two novels, and suggests symbolic explanations for their tremendous power. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Captain Ahab Character in Moby Dick by Herman Melville

    A 5 page discussion of how Captain Ahab challenges the very order of creation in his pursuit of Moby Dick. No additional sources cited.

  • Sin in Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple and Herman Melville's Pierre

    A 7 page paper looking at Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple and Herman Melville's Pierre in terms of their emphasis on sin and death. The paper concludes that both novels end so tragically because eighteenth and nineteenth-century society could not accept any other retribution for turning one's back on society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Beautiful and the Damned by F. Scott Fitgerald

    This 4 page report discusses 'The Beautiful and the Damned,' F. Scott Fitzgerald's second novel written in 1922. The writer's primary focus is on how this novel, like 'The Great Gatsby,' serves as an example of the American dream gone wrong. Bibliography lists only the book itself as a source.

  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

    A 6 page paper on this author and his novel 'Of Mice and Men.' The writer examines the influences in Steinbeck's life, the major themes, critical appeal, and the book's enduring value. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Arthurian Cycle Theme in Tortilla Flat by John Steinbeck

    10 pages in length. In one of John Steinbeck's more worldly creations, Tortilla Flat adopts a decidedly Arthurian theme that reflects a significant Camelot-esque appeal. Monterey, California, is the site of this modern day Camelot, however, replete with all the elements typically related to King Arthur and his court: lust, temptation, emotion, honor and compelling action. Danny, Pillon, Pablo, Big Jog Portagee, Jesus Maria Corcoran and the old Pirate -- also known as the paisanos -- help tell the tale that surrounds the Arthurian cycle Steinbeck so cleverly weaves within the story. The writer discusses the Arthurian cycle as it relates to Tortilla Flat. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Insanity and Sexual Hysteria in Turn of the Screw by Henry James

    A 6 page paper that provides an overview of the elements of James' story that culminate in the depiction of the governess as a women fundamentally driven by her sexual identification and actions, that ultimately end in her insanity. Bibliography lists 6 additional sources.

  • Governess in Turn of the Screw by Henry James

    5 pages in length. When asking the question of whether the governess in Henry James' Turn Of The Screw was truly crazy or merely a victim of ghostly pranks, one has to establish a basis for such an answer. Did she display consistent acts of lunacy in her daily activities? Was she construed as deranged by those with whom she regularly came in contact? The answer is no in both instances. The writer discusses how the governess was quite sane yet still routinely visualized apparitions. No additional sources cited.

  • The Mask by Fumiko Enchi, Turn of the Screw by Henry James, and Gender

    In this 4 page essay, comparisons are made concerning depictions of culture and power (as they relate to gender and feminity) in 'Turn Of The Screw' and 'The Mask.' The first of these suggests that a man can also be the object of a mastering look and that the association of that position with the woman is conventional. The latter work illustrates harsh conditions under which Japanese women had to live in their own society and relevant comparisons are made. No other sources are cited.

  • Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Henry James' Turn of the Screw and Evil

    An 8 page paper discussing how Henry James and Joseph Conrad go about creating their atmospheres of evil in these novels, and what in fact they believe evil to be. The paper concludes that for both authors evil is the presence of something concretely malefficient, not just the absence of something abstractly good. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Relationships, Obstacles, and the Race in White Fang by Jack London

    A 9 page paper describing the major obstacle that primary characters face in order to win the race--their own personal relationship. London presents the reader with a primary statement on man and nature and uses a sled dog race as the vehicle to combine the two in a single goal. Although they also face a number of real difficulties, from the wear and tear of the environment to the competitors, the most difficult obstacle Weedon and White Fang must over come is their own interdependency. FREE outline included. ibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Thematic Elements of 'The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman Analyzed

    A 6 page paper in which the short story 'The Yellow Wallpaper' is discussed. The writer explains the symbolism of the wallpaper to the main character, and analyzes the meaning of the story. No additional sources cited.

  • The theme of insanity in The Yellow Wallpaper

    A 6 page essay on Gilman's 'Yellow Wallpaper' in which the writer describes how the narrator is pushed gradually into a state of madness by her husband, John. Her room is described as a prison and her eventual independence is remarked to have been traded in for her sanity. Quotes from the story are used to support points made. No other sources cited.

  • Self Presentation, Insecurity, and Anxiety in 'The Yellow Wallpaper' by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

    This 5 page paper considers the issues of insecurity, anxiety about her ability to write and issues surrounding self-presentation as they are defined in Charlotte Perkins Gillman's Yellow Wallpaper. This paper reflects the personal elements that are Gilman's in this work and defines the link between Gilman's characterization of the wife and her own personal experiences as they demonstrate her inherent struggles and her own insecurity in the process of asserting her feminist ideologies. No additional sources cited.

  • Suppressed Dialogue in 'The Yellow Wallpaper' by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

    A 5 page paper looking at Charlotte Perkins Gilman's classic short story in terms of what it deliberately does not say. The paper asserts that Gilman's astonishing use of hallucinogenic imagery and symbol conveys the meaning that her protagonist is unable to express. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • J.D. Salinger's Writings

    8 pages in length. The author discusses Catcher in the Rye, 'A Perfect Day for Bananafish', and 'Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut' In these stories Salinger portrays a sense of hopelessness in his choice of main characters. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Feminist Symbolism in the Play Trifles by Susan Glaspell

    An 8 page paper that argues that Glaspell uses name, bird/birdcage and quilt symbolism to delineate opposing identities between men and women, and freedom of the bird based on what men perceive as 'trifles' and women consider a part of their identity. The paper posits that Glaspell's overall goal was a call to arms for the suffrage movement of her times, but also a wake-up call for men to the plight of women. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Easy Rawlins in Devil in a Blue Dress by Walter Moseley

    This 5 page paper considers the character of Easy Rawlins presented in Walter Mosley's novel Devil in a Blue Dress and relates the issue of race, especially Easy's blackness, as it impacts his role as a private eye. This paper considers the sometimes conflicting view of Easy Rawlins and the impact for the novel as a whole. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Edith Wharton's Life, Writings, and Men

    A 5 page paper analyzing the relationship of the men in Edith Wharton's poetry and fiction to the relationships she actually had in her life. The paper determines there is a very close correspondence, and theorizes that putting so much of her personal life into her writing helped her deal with her own experience. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • An Analysis of The Creature in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    This 6 page paper provides an overview of the themes and impact of the Monster's story in the larger novel Frankenstein. In the center of Mary Shelley's novel, the Monster provides an insightful narrative that tells of his experiences after being created by Victor Frankenstein, a narrative that relates his process of learning about his surroundings, language and human emotion. This narrative provides a significant view of the psychology of human development, underscores the problems of creating life using technology, and substantiates the view of the internal conflicts and misperceptions of the Monster pertinent to the defense of his actions. No additional sources cited.

  • Anita Loos and Edith Wharton's Simple Folk

    A 16 page examination of the characterization of 'simple people' in Wharton's Summer and Anita Loos' Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. The paper concludes that simplicity for Loos implies a certain quality of mind, while for Wharton it is a quality of birth. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Communication Lacking in the Fiction of Eudora Welty

    A 5 page paper showing how lack of interpersonal communication is a common theme in Welty's short stories. The paper particularly looks at the stories Death of a Traveling Salesman, A Worn Path, Why I Live at the P.O., and The Hitch-hikers. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton Evaluated Scientifically

    A 10 page study that looks at the efficacy of Crichton's use of science. It is argued that, generally, his scientific principles are accurate, and delineates between those that are applicable and those that are not. The paper provides a report on the current discussion on cloning, DNA and Chaos Theory from both a scientific viewpoint and from the viewpoints represented by Henry Wu (corporate), Ian Malcolm (chaos theory), and Alan Grant (embodiment of social protector). Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • 'Middle Passage' by Charles Johnson

    5 pages in length. The writer offers a brief overview of the book, touching upon important points the story has to make, as well as discusses significant concepts important to the overall understanding of the account. No additional sources cited.

  • David Mamet's Plays and Use of Profanity

    A 5 page paper examining the plays of this award-winning playwright, in terms of his abundant profanity. Looking closely at Edmond and Glengarry Glen Ross, the paper concludes that Mamet's characters cannot really do anything about their powerlessness; the only thing they can do with impunity is swear. Bibliography lists six sources.

  • Future Lessons in the Past Story of Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee by Dee Brown

    A 5 page overview of the events presented in Dee Brown's 1970 book 'Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee'. Discusses the viewpoints of both the whites and the Native Americans and concludes that while what happened was inexcusable, it is a lesson for the future. No additional sources cited.

  • An Analysis of Louise Erdrich's Novel, Tracks

    This 5 page paper reviews Louise Erdrich's Tracks, a 1988 novel about Chippewa Indians living in North Dakota. The book analyzes the major characters of Pauline, Nanapush, Margaret and Fleur and how their struggles reflect the overall struggle of the Native Americans to hold onto what is left of their land and their dignity. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Modernism, Postmodernism, and The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon

    A 9 page paper on Thomas Pynchon's well-known work. The writer notes that while the novel has characteristics of both modernism and postmodernism, its postmodern tendencies predominate in its strongly apocalyptic worldview. Bibliography lists 6 sources including book.

  • Robert James Waller's The Bridges of Madison County

    A 5 page paper on Robert James Waller's novel The Bridges of Madison County. Calling upon the opinions of three literary critics/ columnists, the paper argues that the book's popularity is based on sentimentality at the expense of meaning, and is symptomatic of the mental decay of our entire culture. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Yekl by Abraham Cahan

    Abraham Cahan's Yekl is discussed in this 6 page paper that focuses on the conflict within the main character himself. Several themes of this important novel are explored. No additional sources cited.

  • Joyce Carol Oates' Dark Writings

    A 6 page paper that provides an overview of the darker elements in the writings of Joyce Carol Oates. A number of her stories are used as examples to illustrate points being made. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig

    A 15 page review of the 1974 book by Robert Persig. Explores the concept of perception and how it relates to the ancient philosophy of Zen. Illuminates Persig's concern with the decline in American values and in systems such as our educational system. No additional sources are listed.

  • Orwell and Nieman and Their Views of Big Government

    A 10 page paper which examines George Orwell’s “1984” and Max Nieman’s “Defending Government: Why Big Government Works” as they relate to warnings and positive conditions concerning a controlling, or big, government. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Twentieth Century Literary Icon Ernest Hemingway

    A 7 page paper which examines Ernest Hemingway as a 20th century writer. His life and works are discussed. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • From Pages to Silver Screen with Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Blade Runner

    This 6 page report discusses Blade Runner, the 1982 Ridley Scott movie starring Harrison Ford and Philip Dick’s 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? which “inspired” the movie. Looking at the difficulties of translating literature into film, this report discusses the fact that Blade Runner actually enunciates the ideology of the text rather than simply telling the same story. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The God of Small Things and Sexual Transgression's Dark Reality Symbolism

    This 3 page paper discusses this story and how sexual transgression sybolizes a very dark reality. Because two characters in this story who are of different castes have an affair, they are doomed to a series of ramifications based on the fear of society. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The God of Small Things and Sexual Transgression's Dark Reality Symbolism

    This 3 page paper discusses this story and how sexual transgression sybolizes a very dark reality. Because two characters in this story who are of different castes have an affair, they are doomed to a series of ramifications based on the fear of society. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Characters from The Bible, The Odyssey and Tale of the Genji

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts characters from all of these books, and examines their uniting characteristics. Although these stories vary greatly in terms of content, there are universal themes apparent in them all which serve to connect them. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Twentieth Century Literature and Theological Themes

    This 8 page report discusses the theological themes in: Updike’s The Christian Roommates; Roth’s Eli , the Fanatic; Lewis’s The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe; Archibald MacLeish’s Pulitzer Prize-winning J.B.; Hesse’s Siddhartha, Shaffer’s Equus; and Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find and Artificial Nigger. No bibliography included.

  • The Secret History by Donna Tartt and Henry's Suicide

    This 5 page paper examins whether or not Henry's suicide was a noble gesture, or not. This paper excerpts from the text as support for the thesis. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • 'Because I could not stop for Death' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Emily Dickinson's poem. The writer argues that in this poem, Dickinson presents a rather cordial view of death, which she personifies as a courtly gentleman. Her verse proposes that death entails an adjustment in perspective from the human state of awareness toward one that is universal. In other words, the poem describes a period of adjustment in which the speaker adjusts to a new state of awareness and being. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Because I could not stop for Death' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Emily Dickinson's poem. The writer argues that in this poem, Dickinson presents a rather cordial view of death, which she personifies as a courtly gentleman. Her verse proposes that death entails an adjustment in perspective from the human state of awareness toward one that is universal. In other words, the poem describes a period of adjustment in which the speaker adjusts to a new state of awareness and being. No additional sources cited.

  • Robert Lowell and Bob Dylan

    An 8 page research paper that contrasts and compares Bob Dylan's song "Like a Rolling Stone" and Robert Lowell's poem "Memories of West Street and Lepke." The writer argues that Dylan and Lowell, having established themselves in a particular genre of their craft, changed the course of their careers by taking a different artistic path, much to the surprise of their critics and audiences. Lowell moved from the modernist camp to the postmodern and Dylan moved from folk music to rock n roll. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • An American Literature Study

    This 4 page paper provides a study in American Literature by analyzing the work of William Bradford with that of Cotton Mather. This paper highlights their similarities, differences, the culture and history of the times, etc. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Los Angeles for Authors

    This 5 page paper looks at Los Angeles as a setting for The Day of the Locust but also touches on another work called Mildred Pierce. How L.A. is portrayed in literal geographic terms as well as its cultural geography are explored. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Drink My [Red] Blood' by Richard Matheson

    A 3 page analysis of the theme, setting, character, and symbolism. No additional sources are used.

  • Character Analysis of Nadine in the Short Story 'Water Child'

    A paper which looks critically at the character of Nadine in the short story Water Child, with specific reference to her isolation, her relationships with her parents and her ex-lover, and the impact which the loss of her baby has had on her life. Bibliography lists one source.

  • Short Storie Elements in Works by John Updike, Flannery O'Connor, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, Mark Twain, and Nathaniel Hawthorne

    This is a 6 page paper discussing elements with the short stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne (Rappaccini’s Daughter), Mark Twain (The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg), William Faulkner (Barn Burning), Willa Cather (Paul’s Case), Flannery O’Connor (The Displaced Person), and John Updike (The Music School). The sections each deal with two elements within the stories: for “Rappaccini’s Daughter” the issues discussed are when Rappaccini’s plans for Giovanni become apparent, and why Giovanni expresses such hatred for Beatrice at the end of the story; for “The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg” the issues discussed are what weaknesses the stranger wishes to exploit in the town, and what kind of family quarrels ensue; in “Barn Burning”, the relationship between the boy and his father are discussed in addition to the conflicting feelings the boy has for his father; in “Paul’s Case”, Paul’s judgment of art is discussed along with the events which lead him to leave; “Displaced Persons” deals with why Mrs. McIntyre changes her mind about Mr. Guizac and whether or not Guizac’s death was an accident; finally, in “The Music School”, the character of Albert Schweigen is discussed and why he lives the music school. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Stories by Adam Haslett

    A 6 page paper which examines and analyzes “Notes to my Biographer,” “The Good Doctor,” and “My Father’s Business” by Adam Haslett. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Women and Men in American Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines how two authors of American literature portray men and women. The authors examined are Ernest Hemingway and Kate Chopin. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Comparing and Contrasting Graham Greene's The Destructors and D.H. Lawrence's The Rocking Horse Winner

    This 3 page paper offers an outline, thesis statement and contrast/comparison of characters, themes and plotlines of D.H. Lawrence's The Rocking Horse Winner and G.Greene's story, The Destructors. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • English Literature and Love from the Romantic to Victorian Eras

    This 3 page paper examines the theme of love in English literature by specifically addressing the following works: Thomas Hardy's "Tess of the D'Ubervilles", John Keats "Ode to a Grecian Urn", and Robert Browning's "Porphyria's Lover". This paper provides quotes as evidence of analysis. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Motivations Behind the Banning of Books

    An 8 page paper reviewing three types of motivations for banning books. It appears that books are banned in the 20th century according to one of three categories of reasons: social, political and sexual. Banned books discussed here to address each classification are Mark Twain’s "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," John Steinbeck’s "Grapes of Wrath" and Judy Blume’s "Then again Maybe I Won’t." The reasons given for the banning of any specific book are never good enough. Two of the purposes of books are to instruct and to promote communication between individuals. Each of the books discussed here is well able to serve those purposes, but in many cases have been prevented from serving in such a way. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • 'Pet Cemetery' by Stephen King and the Acceptance of Death

    A 4 page paper which examines the theme of life and death through admitting one must accept death as seen in Stephen King's novel "Pet Cemetery." Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Lyrical Left Wing Greenwich Village Community

    This is a 9 page paper discussing the sexual politics within the lyric left from the Greenwich Village community. The New York Greenwich Village community in the late 19th and throughout the 20th century became the center for writers, journalists and artists all promoting ideas and lifestyle representing the political and sexual left including feminism, bohemianism, bisexuality, homosexuality and overall freedom of thought and action. Much of the writing which came from Greenwich was considered within the realm of the “lyric left” through the works of Jack Kerouac, Djuna Barnes, Sinclair Lewis, Willa Cather and especially Edna St. Vincent Millay among many others. Millay wrote a great many poems which not only revealed the bohemian and “radical sexual” conduct within the lifestyles of her and her colleagues but also commented on the fullest extent of feminism in which women can feel sexual desire and needs in addition to having control over their own lives and sexual fulfillment. At the same time, her poems also show the conflict which still existed between men and women and her own desire to overcome any restrictions carried over from the previous Victorian expectations. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Upton Sinclair's The Jungle and the American Dream

    A 3 page paper which examines the historical realities in Upton Sinclair’s novel “The Jungle.” The paper then discusses whether or not the Jurgis family has lived the American Dream. No additional sources cited.

  • Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Boundaries and Limitations

    This 5 page paper discusses the significance of boundaries and limits in Conrad's, "Heart of Darkness". This issue is examined in terms of the character, plot and symbolism in the story. Bibliography list 1 source.

  • 'You Touched Me' and 'The Horse Dealer's Daughter' by D.H. Lawrence

    A 3 page paper which compares and contrasts elements from D.H. Lawrence’s short stories “The Horse Dealer’s Daughter” and “You Touched Me.” No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Nature

    A 4 page paper which examines the use of nature in Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants” and Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Text and Film Versions of 'A Rose for Emily'

    A 4 page paper which compares and contrasts Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” to the film version of the story. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Fifty Grand,' 'The Natural History of the Dead,' and 'Hills Like White Elephants' by Ernest Hemingway

    This 3 page paper discusses three of Hemingway's short stories: Hills like White Elephants, The Natural History of the Dead, and Fifty Grand. Each are analyzed for summary, characters, and themes. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Themes of Good and Evil in Stowe's Novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin

    An 11 page paper which examines the concept of good and evil within the context of similarities between Uncle Tom and Jesus Christ and other parallels between the text and the Bible, (8.25 pp. + 3/4 pg. outline). Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature of the First World War, Dying, Mutilation, and Death

    A 7 page essay that examines the work of 5 WWI British poets and also Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises. The writer argues that this literature recounts the horrors of war through subtext, that is, not stating observations overtly. Subtext, expressed through metaphor, satire and allusion, provides the motivational engine that propels these works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Hunters in the Snow by Tobias Wolff and Characterization

    This 6 page paper discusses the characterizations of Tobias Wolff in his short story: Hunters in the Snow. Characters analyzed for symbolism, psychology, and function. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature, Self, and Identity

    A 7 page paper which examines the theme of identity and sense of self in “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been” by Joyce Carol Oates, “Joe Turners Come and Gone” by August Wilson, and “Cathedral” by Raymond Carver. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Violence

    A 4 page essay that analyzes three literary works in regards to their use of violence. Throughout the history of Western literature, violence has been frequently used as an integral element of narrative. While unpleasant, often horrific, violence is nevertheless a commonality of human experience and often constitutes the defining element of individual lives. This factor is clearly evident in ancient literature as well as contemporary, as demonstrated in this examination of Sophocles' Oedipus the King, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Anne Tyler's Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literary Fiction and Self Discovery

    A 5 page paper which examines how modern literature offers a different look at self discovery than does literature from previous times. The works discussed in the examination of self discovery are Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” and Kate Chopin’s “The Awakening.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • America from a Multicultural Perspective

    A 14 page contention that contemporary America has set the stage in terms of providing an example to the world of a multicultural country. The author of this paper provides observations on how the various fractions that compose our country interrelate. These observations are provided first from an academic approach, relying on the sociological and anthropological literature, then from a humanistic perspective relying on the popular literature. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Justifying Banning Books for Children That Feature Homosexual Parents

    A 9 page contention that homosexual parenting units are incapable of providing the parental guidance needed by heterosexual children. The author contends, therefore, that the tendency to ban children’s books depicting homosexual parenting units is a just one. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Justifying Banning Books for Children That Feature Homosexual Parents

    A 9 page contention that homosexual parenting units are incapable of providing the parental guidance needed by heterosexual children. The author contends, therefore, that the tendency to ban children’s books depicting homosexual parenting units is a just one. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Literary Depiction of Africa

    This 4 page paper discusses the influence of Africa over the characters in Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Kingslover's The Poisonwood Bible. Quotes cited from texts. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Learning Lessons in Billy Budd and Antigone

    A 3 page essay that argues that the main theme in both Sophocles' Antigone and Herman Melville's Billy Budd is a warning that the society that ignores humanitarian issues does so at its own peril. These narratives warn us that the society that puts punitive justice ahead of all else may be enacting a certain kind of justice, but it does so at the expense of its own soul. In a country that is prosecuting children to the full extent of the law, it is a lesson that should be noticed. No additional sources cited.

  • Nonfiction and Fiction's Portrayal of History

    This 5 page paper discusses the work of James Welch in his novel, The Heartsong of Charging Elk and the documentary with Paul Stekler called, Killing Custer. The use of various literary vehicles are explored. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'This World is not Conclusion' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page paper analyzing Emily Dickinson’s Poem 501. Dickinson makes her point in the first line of the poem, and provides the remainder of it in support of her opening statement. Her message is that despite the efforts of people to explain God, ignore God, “serve” God or define God, He operates in a manner that defies human logic and focuses on the individual. If the individual is able to avoid awareness of God, He is at work nonetheless, nibbling away at the soul, making His presence sensed, at least, if not fully known without first gaining commitment of belief. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Overview of the Play The Crucible by Arthur Miller

    This 10 page paper provides an overview of Arthur Miller's The Crucible. This paper outlines the main characters and then provides an overview of the acts of the play. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Life and Writings of James Fenimore Cooper

    6 pages in length. James Fenimore Cooper, the prolific author who has penned some of the most memorable literary works in American history, did not originally intend to be a writer; rather, the fact that he found his inherent ability to write was discovered quite by accident. His literary career began at the late age of thirty years old, in spite of the fact that he harbored an intense interest in reading just about everything that came his way. As time went on, Cooper focused more heartily upon his craft, as well as American issues, which served to thrust him into the literary world. The writer discusses Cooper's life and work. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Clara Wieland and Ellen Montgomery in Wieland and The Wide, Wide World

    This 7 page research paper compares and contrasts the characters of Ellen Montgomery in Susan Bogert Warner's The Wide, Wide World (1852), and Clara Wieland in Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland (1798). Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Tropic of Capricorn and Tropic of Cancer by Miller

    An 8 page comparative essay on Henry Miller's 'Tropic of Cancer' and 'Tropic of Capricorn.' The writer argues that the subject of these sexually explicit books was the real quadrangle of sex—passion, politics, boredom and death. Although he viewed the works as conscious-raising efforts, he believed his attempts would be futile. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Epistolary Novel and Fair and Tender Ladies by Lee Smith

    A 6 page paper which looks at the format of Lee Smith's Fair and Tender Ladies as series of letters, and demonstrate how the main character both reflects her culture and her own growth through her writing. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Unredeemed Captive by John Demos

    A 7 page paper reviewing John Demos' 1994 book, The Unredeemed Captive. Bibliography lists no additional sources.

  • Joyce Chopra's Smooth Talk Film and Joyce Carol Oates' 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'

    A 6 page paper comparing Joyce Chopra’s film “Smooth Talk”, with Joyce Carol Oates’ “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”, the short story on which the film was based. The paper argues that in allowing the protagonist to live at the end instead of being murdered as Oates implies in her story, Chopra has changed the tale’s moral. No additional sources.

  • Madeleine L'Engle's 'A Wrinkle in Time'

    6 pages in length. Science fiction has never been quite the same for the elementary and secondary school students who read Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time. Bringing together the concepts of good versus evil, courage, love's power and the coming of age, this endearing and enduring book has stood the test of time and proven itself worthy of being revisited again and again. The story, which chronicles the adventures of thirteen-year-old Meg Murry and her five-year-old brother Charles, possesses numerous fantasy elements which inspire the reader's imagination and encourage him to become intimately involved with the characters. The writer discusses characters, lessons and morals as they relate to A Wrinkle in Time. No additional sources used.

  • Jasmine by Bharati Mukherjee

    A 7 page paper that provides an overview of the theme of Americanization in Bharati Mukherjee's Jasmine and underscores the belief that true assimilation into American culture is seldom achieved by illegal immigrants. Bibliography lists no additional sources.

  • Pain and Healing in Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin

    A 5 page examination of James Baldwin's short story Sonny's Blues. The writer examines Baldwins use of foreshadowing and the metaphors of light, darkness and ice and how music seems to be the healing element in the story. No additonal sources cited.

  • The Definition of Utopia

    This 5 page paper examines three encyclopedia definitions of the term utopia and compares them to the utopia which is defined by Marge Piercy in her book, Woman on the Edge of Time.

  • She's Come Undone by Wally Lamb

    In 5 pages, the writer discusses the novel "She's Come Undone" by Wally Lamb. The questions of "How does Dolores' life parallel her mother's?", and How does she ultimately triumph and move beyond her tie to her mother's failures?" are answered.

  • Lake of the Woods Novel by Tim O'Brien

    A 5 page paper which analyzes Tim O'Brien's 1994 novel, Lake of the Woods, to determine how events from John Wade's past made his future inevitable, whether his outcome was just or unjust as well as O'Brien's interpretation. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Feminist Criticism and Literature

    6 pages in length. To say that women have had to fight for their existence within the literary world would be a gross understatement. Indeed, the road to self-expression through the written word has been paved with patriarchal intolerance and characteristic skepticism. That women have been forced to prove their worthiness within the stringent boundaries of a male-dominated existence speaks volumes about the inherent fortitude that comprises the female spirit. The writer discusses feminist critical theory as it relates to women writers, focusing upon a story by Doris Lessing. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Message of Billy Budd by Herman Melville

    5 pages in length. What message was Herman Melville attempting to get across within his story of 'Billy Budd'? Melville, himself was considerably preoccupied with the problems of God and God's design of the world as they related to good and evil, right and wrong. To Melville, human nature represented a dichotomy of description in that it was the author's interpretation that humanity was at the crux of many world problems. In one's assessment of Melville's intention, it is important to note that the nautical theme is extremely crucial to the author's overall objective with regard to defining the limitations of human nature. The writer discusses the message of 'Billy Budd.' No additional sources cited.

  • The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck

    4 pages in length. The objective of Pearl S. Buck in her enthralling book entitled The Good Earth is to demonstrate the inherent strength of women despite the fact that a patriarchal society has perpetually kept them oppressed. Clearly defined in the author's portrayal is that of a common bond shared between and among Chinese women with regard to their oppression. The fact that oppression has been a way of life for Chinese women is indicative of O-lan's experience as told within the pages of The Good Earth. The writer discusses the various messages addressed in Buck's The Good Earth. No additional sources cited.

  • Hotel du Lac by Anita Brookner

    A 3 page analysis of Anita Brookner's novel Hotel du Lac. It's the rather sad tale of a 39-year-old Englishwoman with the symbolic name of 'Edith Hope' who is sent by concerned friends to sit out a scandal at small, discreet resort in Switzerland, the Hotel du Lac. The story revolves around the central question of what sort of behavior is appropriate for a woman, and how Edith handles finding her own direction and decisions regarding this particular issue. Edith must decide whether or not she will meet society's expectations or determine what expectations are appropriate on her own. No additional sources cited.

  • Violence in Lord of the Flies by William Golding

    This 5 page report discusses Golding’s 1954 “Lord of the Flies” and its underlying themes of violence and fear. The story of the boys lost on a desert island serves as an allegory for the fundamental core of violence that is buried deep within every human. As the boys become increasingly polarized, the reader sees how far they have given over to the violence that is energizing them. No secondary sources listed in bibliography.

  • Civilization and Savagery in the Works of Mary Rowlandson and James Fenimore Cooper

    A 5 page analysis of James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans and Mary White Rowlandson's personal narrative that tells of her capture by Narragansett Indians in a 1675 attack on Lancaster, Mass. The writer argues that both of these accounts are revealing as to how whites viewed Native Americans and how this showed the contrast between what is considered 'civilized behavior' and savagery. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparative Analysis of Tim O'Brien's Novels The Things They Carried and Going After Cacciato

    A 15 page comparison between the above mentioned novels by Tim O'Brien. In these novels, O'Brien examines feelings and uncertainties that speak to the heart of being human and leave the reader thinking, rather then feeling that all their questions have been answered. O'Brien's artistry encompasses all of the nuances and pathos of the human condition, but set within a framework that coincides with the period that formed the crux of his own experience‹the Vietnam War. The writer specifically examines the novels relative to O'Brien's use of structure. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Analysis of The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

    A 3.5 page analysis of Toni Morrison's novel, The Bluest Eye. In this novel, a little black girl, Pecola Breedlove, longs to have blue eyes because everyone she has ever met, and everything in her environment, either consciously or unconsciously, has consistently upheld an ideal of beauty in front of her, and that ideal is white‹white skin, long blond hair and blue eyes‹the cultural epitome of beauty, which is culturally equated with being good. Morrison dramatically reveals what happens to a person's sense of self-worth when their individuality and personal appearance are totally negated by the society in which they live. No additional sources cited.

  • The Octopus by Frank Norris

    A 6 page analysis of this turn-of-the-century novel. The writer argues that the early-twentieth century novelist Frank Norris created a work of literature‹a work of art‹that also reflected the actual history of the state of California. Reflective of the school of naturalistic writing that was predominant at that time, Norris was intent on presenting a human story that was reflective the influence of the Californian environment, yet showing these influences within a context that touched on the relevant issues of the twentieth century. No additional sources cited.

  • The Wilding of America by Charles Derber

    A 5 page analysis of Charles Derber's book, The Wilding of America. 'Wilding' is defined by Derber as an epidemic of self-centeredness, competitiveness, and greed that has effects on urban and suburban environments as well as corporate boardrooms and even Congress. Derber shows how this is corrupting the nation's character and his conclusions are discussed. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Bear Comes Home by Rafi Zabor and Jazz

    A six page paper on Rafi Zabor’s fascinating novel about a bear who plays alto sax. The paper shows how Zabor’s use of a performing bear as a protagonist is an allegory for the traditional position of the black person in the arts; it also describes the strong bond between the jazz and literature. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • The Bear Comes Home by Rafi Zabor and Jazz

    A six page paper on Rafi Zabor’s fascinating novel about a bear who plays alto sax. The paper shows how Zabor’s use of a performing bear as a protagonist is an allegory for the traditional position of the black person in the arts; it also describes the strong bond between the jazz and literature. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • Richard Wright's Black Boy and William Faulkner's Light in August and Black Identity

    A six page paper comparing the protagonists of these two works (by William Faulkner and Richard Wright respectively) in terms of their racial identities, and their reactions to them. The paper asserts that it is very difficult to establish a positive racial identity when one’s race is constantly disparaged by society as a whole, and this has made both protagonists extremely hostile. Bibliography lists five sources.

  • Of Mice and Men vs. The Pearl

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts John Steinbeck’s short novels, 'The Pearl' & 'Of Mice & Men,' and also provides some biographical information on the author, including a brief discussion of some of his other works and some of the writing awards Steinbeck received. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Jo Ann Mort's Not Your Father's Union Movement

    This 5 page paper presents an example book review of Jo-Ann Mort’s anthology on the AFL-CIO. The compilation of writings includes a variety of topics including those pertinent to American politics as well as those which affect workers abroad. No additional sources cited.

  • All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes by Maya Angelou

    A 5 page analysis of All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes by Maya Angelou, which is the fifth volume in her serial autobiography. This volume is an account of Angelou's experiences in Ghana in the early 1960s. This narrative relates how Angelou found a job teaching at the University of Ghana and began working as an editor. While the narrative naturally includes the details of where Angelou worked, and the major details of her life, the motivating force behind the book is how Angelou worked to relate emotionally to Ghana and her African heritage. No additional sources cited.

  • Novels of Danielle Steel

    6 pages in length. The writer briefly discusses a common theme among nine of Steel's novels: Daddy, The Gift, Five Days In Paris, Silent Honor, The Ranch, Special Delivery, The Long Road Home, Mirror Image and Bittersweet. No additional sources cited.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises and New Value Search

    An 8 page paper which discusses how, with the use of characterization, symbolism, and the narrator, Ernest Hemmingway illustrates how people are searching for new values in their lives. They are searching for new values in their lives because many of the old ones were destroyed along with the war. Bibliography lists 6 additional sources.

  • Literature and Free Will

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Stephen Crane's 'The Open Boat' with Jack London's 'To Build a Fire.' The concept of free will is explored in respect to the characters in these works. The short stories are compared and contrasted. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Free Will

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Stephen Crane's 'The Open Boat' with Jack London's 'To Build a Fire.' The concept of free will is explored in respect to the characters in these works. The short stories are compared and contrasted. No additional sources cited.

  • Women's Self Determination in The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A five page paper showing how this nineteenth-century feminist author structured her novel in order to explicate her theme of the importance of a woman's self-determination. The paper asserts that far from being a "shock" ending, the protagonist's suicide is the predictable result of her inability to achieve her potential. Bibliography lists seven sources.

  • Being There by Kosinski

    This 5 page paper provides a first person analysis of the protagonist. The book is discussed in terms of Chance's relationship with plants and television as well as other things. No additional sources cited.

  • Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs

    Harriet Jacobs wrote the story of her life of enslavement, mistreatment, confinement and eventual freedom shortly after the end of the Civil War. This 5 page paper argues that Incidents in the Life of A Slave Girl was intended to be read as a slave narrative and, as such to provide a historical documentation of what the reality of slavery entailed - at least for a young woman. It is also a political manifesto in that it argues that the realities of slavery were not much different from the Northern social norms of segregation. No additional sources are listed.

  • Our Secret by Susan Griffin

    5 pages in length. The writer discusses Susan Griffin's "Our Secret" as it relates to true spirituality and human connectedness. No additional sources cited.

  • What Invisibility Means in Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

    A six page paper looking at Ralph Ellison's novel in terms of the way certain classes of people are rendered invisible by a society that refuses to see them as individuals. The paper observes that by the end of the novel, the protagonist has moved from a socially-imposed invisibility that makes him personally inauthentic to a self-imposed invisibility where he can be truly himself. Bibliography lists ten sources.

  • Lingering Power of The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

    A 10 page paper that explores the figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and irony contained in Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie". Also discussed are the underlying themes of the story. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Historical and Social Perspectives of Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

    5 pages in length. The social and historical aspect in Joseph Conrad’s "Heart of Darkness" are such that they are significantly more subtle than it is obvious. There exist both implied and obscure representation within Conrad's text, as well as those that possess a more literal image and conceptualization. The writer discusses that Conrad’s implication of social and historical impact within a traditional, even romantic setting leaves one to ascertain that the author possessed a great sense of the future within his writings. No additional sources cited.

  • Amerian Society and Economy as Presented in John Ford's Stagecoach and Ann Banks' First Person America

    5 pages in length. Ann Banks' "First Person America" and John Ford's "Stagecoach" individually represent a changing class-consciousness related to modifying economic and social conditions of the 1930s. Indeed, it can readily be argued that imaginative texts do not directly document such experiences of the 1930s, but rather they indirectly represent conflicts, tensions, changing values and the ever shifting conditions of the particular setting. No additional sources cited.

  • Frank Serpico and Willie Stark

    This 5 page paper compares the real life Frank Serpico and the fictional Willie Stark who appears in All the King's Men. Corruption is the theme as they are compared and contrasted to one another. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Frank Serpico and Willie Stark

    This 5 page paper compares the real life Frank Serpico and the fictional Willie Stark who appears in All the King's Men. Corruption is the theme as they are compared and contrasted to one another. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Cultural Influences Exerted by the Life and Art of Robert Frost

    A 3 page essay that discusses the life of Robert Frost in connection with his poetry. Three poems are briefly analyzed and the writer relates what has been learned by this assignment. One of twentieth century America's greatest poets, Robert Frost (1874-1963), wrote verse that was not initially popular with the American public. For the first several decades of his adult life, Frost worked at a variety of jobs, and his family existed on the edge of poverty. He did not obtain financial stability and success as a poet until he was forty years old (Baym, et al 1762). Frost was a conservative poet who adhered to traditional forms and continued to write in the twentieth century the "kind of traditional poetry that modernists thought could no longer be written" (Baym, et al 1762). Through his remarkable use of imagery and also through his use of rhythm, which mirrors that of colloquial speech, Frost's poems often draw on the natural world to express complex meanings and nuances of understanding concerning life's major issues. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Schlosser: "Fast Food Nation"

    This 4 page paper discusses what Schlosser says about standardization, uniformity, and conformity in the fast food industry on one hand, and nonconformist entrepreneurs on the other. It also considers the movie industry, which is becoming standardized in the same way as fast food. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Chopin's Awakening/Edna & Adele & Mme. Reisz

    A 3 page essay that discussing the roles of Adele and Mme. Reisz in Kate Chopin's nineteenth century masterpiece The Awakening, which tells the story of Edna Pontellier, a Victorian era wife and mother who rejects that era's strict interpretation of gender roles as she attempts to fashion a life as an autonomous, sexual individual and as an artist. Ultimately, however, Edna rejects even this alternative lifestyle and commits suicide. To aid the reader in understanding Edna and the motivations for her actions throughout the novel, Chopin contrasts Edna with two very different women, Adele Ratignolle and Mademoiselle Reisz. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Research Proposal: Nick in "The Great Gatsby"

    This 3 page paper is a proposal to analyze the character of Nick in "The Great Gatsby," explaining why this character was chosen. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Revenge as a Theme in Literature

    This 6 page paper compares the way in which the revenge theme is handled by Shakespeare in Hamlet, Poe in "The Cask of Amontillado" and Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess." Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Nick Carraway/The Great Gatsby

    An 8 page essay that focuses on the character of Nick Carraway as the narrative voice in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. The writer argues that Nick Carraway, as Gatsby's friend and Daisy's cousin, is the ideal choice for providing the narrative voice of the novel, for a number of reasons. First of all, because the reader learns about Gatsby as Nick does, this gives the novel a definitive structure, which concentrates on the illusion that Gatsby has created in the opening chapters and then slowly reveals pertinent details of Gatsby's life as Nick discovers them. Nick's character also provides Fitzgerald with a means of commenting, interpreting and evaluating the action of the novel. In this manner, Nick's narration gives the reader insight into both Gatsby and Daisy that would otherwise be unavailable if Fitzgerald had chosen either one of these characters for providing the main point-of-view. Furthermore, Nick gives the reader someone with whom they can readily identify, as his emotional progress throughout the novel offers a hopeful template for reconciling the negative features of the era with a traditional past. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • The Existential Peanuts

    This 3 page paper considers whether or not Peanuts could be considered as an examination of existentialism as well as an extremely amusing comic strip, and concludes that it can. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature and Life

    A 3 page paper which examines Arnold Weinstein’s thesis, in his book “A Scream Goes Through the House: What Literature Teaches Us About Life,” which indicates that literature provides us information regarding human conditions. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature and Life

    A 3 page paper which examines Arnold Weinstein’s thesis, in his book “A Scream Goes Through the House: What Literature Teaches Us About Life,” which indicates that literature provides us information regarding human conditions. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Narrative Writing & Shepherd's Christmas Story

    A 7 page research paper/essay that discusses narrative writing technique by analyzing an excerpt from Jean Shepherd's A Christmas Story. The writer describes good narrative techniques and then applies them to the text of the Shepherd narrative. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • “The Gates of Fire” by Steven Pressfield

    A 4 page review of Steven Pressfield’s “The Gates of Fire.” No additional sources cited.

  • Poe/Annabel Lee

    A 3 page explication of Edgar Allan Poe's last poem, Annabel Lee, which was written in 1849. The writer argues that this poem is a haunting tribute by the still grieving Poe for his young wife Virginia who had passed away two years previously from tuberculosis. Examination of this poem's theme, mood and point-of-view demonstrates the depth of emotion that Poe had for his deceased child/bride, as well as how he viewed his own death with equanimity because he saw it as uniting him with his beloved. No additional sources cited.

  • Poe/Annabel Lee

    A 3 page explication of Edgar Allan Poe's last poem, Annabel Lee, which was written in 1849. The writer argues that this poem is a haunting tribute by the still grieving Poe for his young wife Virginia who had passed away two years previously from tuberculosis. Examination of this poem's theme, mood and point-of-view demonstrates the depth of emotion that Poe had for his deceased child/bride, as well as how he viewed his own death with equanimity because he saw it as uniting him with his beloved. No additional sources cited.

  • Grief in The Lovely Bones

    This 3 page paper examines this novel and focuses on the mother character. How the grief process has been halted is the focus of attention. Suggestions are made. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The World of Work

    This 3 page paper uses two works of literature to comment on the way in which work can destroy a person; in one ("Hazel tells LaVerne"), the lack of self-esteem leads a woman to miss a great opportunity; in the other ("A&P"), a manager's slavish devotion to "the rules" costs him a good employee. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Jay Gatsby: A Great Man?

    A 4 page paper which examines whether or not Jay Gatsby, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby, is a great man or not. No additional sources cited.

  • Sandra Cisneros: Women Hollering Creek

    Sexual Warfare : A 4 page paper which examines the politics of sexual warfare in three stories from Sandra Cisneros’ work Women Hollering Creek. No additional sources cited.

  • "The Way of a Ship"

    This 3 page paper takes its inspiration from the novel "The Way of a Ship" by Derek Lundy to explore the ocean conditions around Cape Horn. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • "My Own Country: A Doctor's Story"

    This 5 page paper discusses the book "My Own Country" by Abraham Verghese, who worked with AIDS patients in rural Tennessee in the 1980s. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Yellow Wallpaper & Female Marginalization

    A 5 page research paper/essay that discusses Charlotte Perkins Gilman's short story "The Yellow Wallpaper" (1899), which can be understood as indicative of women's role in late nineteenth century society. This narrative portrays the way in which Victorian patriarchal attitudes served to marginalize women. Male authority trivialized female voices and regarded women more as children in adult bodies than as adult themselves. In addition to this element, Gilman's short story also introduces the way in which the medical professional interacted with women, supporting the cultural paradigm that marginalized women and added the authority of the male doctor to the social boundaries that keep women from having any sense of adult autonomy. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Concepts in Short Stories

    This 3 page paper discusses Kafka's short story "In a Penal Colony" and whether or not it represents procedural justice and argues that it does not. Then it discusses Willa Cather's work "Paul's Case," "The Country Doctor" by Balzac and "The Swimmer" by Cheever, and argues that only Neddy in the swimmer would be considered to have a life that Sisyphus would applaud. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Sexual Behavior in "The Godfather"

    This 7 page paper discusses the animalistic nature of sex acts in Mario Puzo's novel "The Godfather." Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Edith Wharton’s Roman Fever

    A 6 page analysis of Edith Wharton’s short story Roman Fever. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Chopin/The Awakening/Suicide as Closure

    A 4 page reaction essay to Kate Chopin's nineteenth century novel The Awakening. In this essay, the writer argues that Edna Pontellier commits suicide not because she cannot escape the yoke of patriarchy, but because she cannot escape her own scarred psyche and the biological destiny of being female. No additional sources cited.

  • Anne Bradsreet/In Reference to Her Children, 23 June 1659

    A 3 page explication of this poem by Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), America's first published poet, who wrote her verse while raising eight children, and performing all of the wifely duties expected of Puritan wife in colonial New England (Anne Bradstreet). While Bradstreet stepped somewhat outside the societal sphere of hearth and home, which was the accepted realm of women, by writing verse, her verse underscored her understanding of the domestic role, and therefore, did not offend Puritan society. Her poem "In Reference to her Children, 23 June 1659" expresses a mother's pride at the accomplishments of her children, as well as mother's fears at having her little ones leave the "nest" and fly away on their own. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Gary Jennings/Aztec

    A 6 page book review and essay that consists of 2 parts, each 3 pages in length. The first half of the paper offers a synopsis of the novel Aztec by Gary Jennings. The write covers the structure and main topics of the novel, describing how it informs the reader about Aztec culture. The second part of the paper then compares Aztec culture to the modern world, pointing out similarities and differences. No additional sources cited.

  • Analysis: "The Tell Tale Heart"

    This 4 page paper examines Edgar Allan Poe's classic story "The Tell Tale Heart." It argues that the narrator is in the grip of obsession that leads him to kill. It also argues that the same can be said of Willard in the film "Apocalypse Now." Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • American Ethnic Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines what American Ethnic Literature should do. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • New Orleans Literature: Race, Class and Gender

    A 5 page paper which examines the perspectives of race, class and gender in New Orleans literature. The paper examines the work of Walker Percy, Louis Armstrong, and Ellen Gilchrist. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Gatsby & the American Dream

    A 3 page essay that discusses F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, which can be viewed as an exploration of the psychological ramifications of the American Dream. Examination of Fitzgerald’s masterpiece indicates the reasons for the enduring relevance of this book as it accurately and insightfully portrays the contradictions that characterize the American Dream and how this can influence individual lives. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Themes: To Kill a Mockingbird

    A 3 page paper which examines various themes in Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. No additional sources cited.

  • Management/Labor Conflict in "The Grapes of Wrath"

    This 3 page paper argues that Steinbeck's purpose in writing "The Grapes of Wrath" was to illustrate the way in which management exploits labor, and he did it by creating a protagonist (Tom Joad) who changed from a disinterested person to a man committed to organizing labor. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Symbolism in "The Great Gatsby"

    This 10 page paper discusses Fitzgerald's use of color symbolism in his classic novel "The Great Gatsby." Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart

    A 5 page tutorial analysis of Edgar Allen Poe’s short story The Tell-Tale Heart. No additional sources cited.

  • O. Henry/Gift of the Magi

    A 5 page essay that discusses the career of William Sydney Porter, who is better known by his pseudonym of “O. Henry,” a man who is one of America’s most prolific writers of the short story genre (O. Henry, Writer). Over the course of his career, O. Henry wrote roughly 600 short stories, which were published in 14 volumes (William Sydney Porter). A master of suspense, O. Henry portrayed the lives of ordinary people, but would typically use a plot twist that gave his stories a characteristic sense of irony (O. Henry). It is O. Henry’s trademark sense of irony that gives one of his best known stories, “The Gift of the Magi,” its grace and meaning. The paper focuses on discusses this story. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Homsexuality in Capote’s Other Voices, Other Rooms

    A 3 page paper which examines whether or not the protagonist in Truman Capote’s novel Other Voices, Other Rooms was a blossoming homosexual. Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • Robert Frost/The Road Not Taken

    A 4 page essay that analyzes Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken.” There are crucial decisions in life that influence the nature that the person’s life takes from that moment onward. For a Christian, one such decision is when the individual decides to accept the gift of Salvation and follow Christ. This crucial decision sets the path or course for the person’s life. Robert Frost beautifully dramatizes the significance of this type of momentous decision in his poem “The Road Not Taken.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Sylvia Plath, Mirror & Metaphors

    A 5 page research paper/essay that discusses 2 poems by Sylvia Plath, who was born in 1932 to Aurelia and Otto Plath in Boston, Massachusetts and died in 1963 by her own hand, committing suicide just a few months after her thirtieth birthday (Inness 10-13). Talented, young, beautiful, with two small children—despite the depression caused a separation from her husband--Plath’s suicide remains an enigma that critics draw upon when facing the task of deciphering the meaning of her poetry and her life. Looking specifically at two of her poems, “Metaphors,” which is dated March 20, 1959 and “Mirror,” which is dated October 23, 1961, it is possible to discern something of the disintegration of Plath’s mindset between writing these two works. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster

    A 3 page paper which examines the work How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Need for Hard-Back Books

    A 3 page essay that discusses why hard-back books are better than reading books online. Reading a book is not the same as reading text on a computer screen. This is true for several reasons. First of all, there is the immediacy of hard-back book, as everything the reader needs is there, at the fingertips. There is also the factor of portability, that is, not everyone has a laptop or a book reader. Also, there is the problem of copyright and issues pertaining to access, which seem likely to continue to constitute obstacles to Internet access to recent books. Taking these points individually, the value of hard-back books is self-evident. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Amy Tan’s Two Kinds: Mothers and Daughters

    A 4 page paper which examines mother/daughter relationships as seen through Amy Tan’s short story Two Kinds. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Analysis: “The Sun Also Rises”

    This 6 page paper analyzes the themes of gender and sports in Hemingway’s novel “The Sun Also Rises.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • American Literature: Realism

    A 7 page paper which examines various authors and periods in American literature as they offer images of realism. The literature examined is Kate Chopin’s The Storm, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper, and Stephen Crane’s The Open Boat. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 3 page analysis of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Dyson: Come Hell or High Water

    This 3 page paper discusses the concept of framing as explained by Michael Eric Dyson in his book “Come Hell or High Water,” and shows how that concept was used to denigrate blacks in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Tree Symbolism in “A Separate Peace”

    This 3 page paper discusses the symbolism of the tree in John Knowles’ novel “A Separate Peace.” Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Crane/Maggie: A Girl of the Streets & Naturalism

    An 11 page research paper/essay on Stephen Crane’s late nineteenth century novel Maggie: A Girl of the Streets. This paper consists of an 8 page essay, plus a 3 page annotated bibliography and 1 page proposal on the topic that the essay addresses. The writer argues that Crane is a naturalist writer and that Maggie is intentionally crafted to avoid the problems associated with realism and to express a naturalistic point of view. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Crane/Maggie: A Girl of the Streets & Naturalism

    An 11 page research paper/essay on Stephen Crane’s late nineteenth century novel Maggie: A Girl of the Streets. This paper consists of an 8 page essay, plus a 3 page annotated bibliography and 1 page proposal on the topic that the essay addresses. The writer argues that Crane is a naturalist writer and that Maggie is intentionally crafted to avoid the problems associated with realism and to express a naturalistic point of view. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Homosexuality in the Works of Oscar Wilde

    7 pages in length. Did Oscar Wilde's homosexual tendencies provide the author with a hidden theme throughout his works? Some have argued that the author's anxieties with regard to his own homosexuality represents a subtle but obvious enough underlying theme. Although the characters in Oscar Wilde's stories are all in heterosexual relationships, critics contend that there exists an undercurrent of homosexual desire between and among the main characters. They cite that in many of his works, exposure of a secret sin or indiscretion and consequent disgrace is central in design, clearly symbolizing the author's penchant toward homosexuality throughout his literary creations. The writer discusses how one only needs to peruse the myriad pages of Wilde's works in order to ascertain the truth: there is no homosexual reference, hidden or otherwise. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Working Life in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

    5 pages in length. Like ants banded together as a means by which to survive, John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" exemplifies the inherent struggles of class distinction. Indeed, the depiction of toil and strife was to represent the very essence of life for the wayward travelers in search of a day's wage. The pittance of work they were able to find only served to sustain them for the next journey they would face, once again in search of work to support a meager and terribly unstable lifestyle. The writer discusses how for the Joads and all the other people searching for survival during the Depression, work was not merely a means to an end, but rather was the means upon which they staked their entire existence. No additional sources cited.

  • The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner and the Technique of Stream of Consciousness

    A 7 page paper that argues the point that the personalities and philosophies of the characters in William Faulkner's The Sound and The Fury are most effectively presented and emphasized in the order in which the author presents the four sections of the story. Discussed is Faulkner's combination of the stream-of-consciousness technique and the first person narrative style to present an inside view of the depth of the story's sense of chaos as well as his effective manipulation of time sequencing to emphasize this chaos. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The Call of the Wild Still Calls

    A 5 page paper that analyzes the concepts of animal intelligence and primeval memory presented by Jack London's 1903 novel The Call of The Wild and compares these concepts with the forces behind the modern Animal Rights Movement as well as the Feminist Movement. Included are views on the relationship between humans and animals as expressed by feminist leaders and by ecologists and rights activists. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Family Structure Theories and Clyde Edgerton's Raney

    This 5 page paper discussed Clyde Edgerton's successful novel Raney, as related to the family structure theories of Minuchin, Bowen and Satir. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • American Literature and the Issue of Class

    This 10 page thesis paper explores the proletarian movement in the thirties. The paper supports the idea that literature highlighting class differences spans the entire twentieth century. The works which are a primary focus is Sinclair's The Jungle and Odets's Waiting for Lefty. The concept of class is viewed in terms of how it is portrayed in American literature as well as its relationship with political ideology. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • American Literature and the Issue of Class

    This 10 page thesis paper explores the proletarian movement in the thirties. The paper supports the idea that literature highlighting class differences spans the entire twentieth century. The works which are a primary focus is Sinclair's The Jungle and Odets's Waiting for Lefty. The concept of class is viewed in terms of how it is portrayed in American literature as well as its relationship with political ideology. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literary Considerations of Greed

    This 5 page paper looks at Willy Loman of Miller's Death of a Salesman and Milkman in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon to explain how these characters are driven by greed. The characters are compared and contrasted. The subject of greed and the American Dream are explored as thematic elements of these works. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Considerations of Greed

    This 5 page paper looks at Willy Loman of Miller's Death of a Salesman and Milkman in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon to explain how these characters are driven by greed. The characters are compared and contrasted. The subject of greed and the American Dream are explored as thematic elements of these works. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Beloved by Toni Morrison

    This 5 page paper analyzes the characters Sethe and Beloved, their motivations and psyche. The relationship between mother and daughter is highlighted. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature in The Gilded Age

    A 6 page analysis of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum and Looking Backward by Edward Bellamy. The writer argues that each of these writers incorporated into their novels aspects and characteristics of the age in which they were written—the 'Gilded Age' at the close of the nineteenth century. No additional sources cited.

  • Mass Media and Its Influence

    A 5 page paper that examines the tremendous influence of the mass media as presented in The Interplay of Influence: News, Advertising, Politics, and the Mass Media by authors Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Karlyn Kohrs Campbell. Discussed are the three sections in which the book is divided, sections that detail the influence and role of the mass media in news presentation, advertising, and political campaigns respectively. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Shawl by Cynthia Ozick

    When one sits down to read the novella, The Shawl, by Cynthia Ozick, it is difficult to know in advance the amount of emotional investment one is likely to make, however, reader: be warned, this is a story that will grip your heart and not let go. This 5 page paper explores the metaphors and symbols of the story in an effort to understand the greater meaning meant by the author. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'The Crowd' by Ray Bradbury

    A 5 page paper that presents a critical analysis and discussion of the major theme and primary idea presented in Ray Bradbury's 1943 short story The Crowd. This discussion includes a brief history of Bradbury's writing career and examines how the writer's life experiences and observations are reflected in The Crowd as well as in the majority of his works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson

    A 5 page summation and analysis of 'Snow Falling on Cedars,' David Guterson's first novel, which uses the trial of a Japanese-American as a springboard for a narrative that explores issues of racism and injustice on a small island in Puget Sound, not long after the Japanese-American internment, which occurred during World War II. No additional sources cited.

  • Langston Hughes' 'Salvation'

    A 5 page paper which examines and analyzes the representation of the persona in the piece "Salvation" by Langston Hughes. No additional sources cited.

  • Southern Locations and Their Importance in the Works of William Faulkner

    ( 6 pp) Introduction Faulkner's main concern lies with depicting the historical development of the South, the degeneration of values, the effect of racism and the psychological state of mind of Southerners In apocryphal Yoknapatawpha County, setting for most of his fiction and patterned after his real-life home in Oxford and Lafayette County, Mississippi, Faulkner writes of regional characters who tell of economic and social frustrations. This famous address in American literature is a familiar location to literature students of all ages who encounter it in such stories as Barn Burning, A Rose for Emily, and That Evening Sun. ibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Works of Playwright Lillian Hellman

    This 6 page paper takes a glimpse at this playwright's interesting life and then goes on to compare and contrast two of her early works. The Children's Hour and The Little Foxes are discussed in depth. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Michael Shaara's Killer Angels

    This 5 page paper provides a discussion on this historic novel by Michael Shaara. The work focuses on the Battle of Gettysburg and has been critically acclaimed. The theme of bravery is explored. No additional sources cited.

  • Arthur C. Clarke and Gentry Lee's Rama II

    This 3 page paper explores the science fiction novel written by Arthur Charles Clarke and Gentry Lee. Characters are discussed in depth. No additional sources cited.

  • Battle of Gettysburg and Geography's Importance

    This 5 page paper provides a discussion on Killer Angels by Michael Shaara in reference to geographic considerations. Killer Angels intricately portrays events that occurred during the Battle of Gettysburg. No additional sources cited.

  • Feminist Approach to Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

    5 pages in length. Leslie Marmon Silko's "Ceremony" addresses a long-standing issue that has existed between Native American men and women: the open and equal pursuit of identity. That patriarchy has been the controlling social force for centuries has effectively placed the female gender in the shadows of acceptance, while the male gender has successfully progressed in all possible areas: politics, education and economics. For women, these areas have long histories of restraint through design of the woman’s role; the effects of such designs have been so well entrenched that they have automatically applied to virtually every other area of public life. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Analysis of Character, Theme, Symbols, and Setting

    This 11 page report discusses a number of well-known literary works that offer a broad range of styles and concepts relating to the 19th and 20th century literary experience. Authors considered are Nathaniel Hawthorne, James Joyce, William Faulkner, Henrik Ibsen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, poet Elizabeth Bishop and brief references to William Shakespeare’s “Othello” and Robert Burns’ “Red, Red Rose.” Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Praying Our Experiences by Joseph F. Schmidt

    A 5 page paper that presents a reflection of Joseph F. Schmidt's Praying Our Experiences written in the third person narrative style. Included are tutorial notes and suggestions on how this paper may be written in the first person voice or style. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Tayeb Salih's Season of Migration to the North, Toni Morrison's Beloved and Ghosts

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Toni Morrison's 'Beloved' with Tayeb Salih's 'Season of Migration to the North.' Themes are discussed along with the significance of spirit and the afterlife in each. No additional sources cited.

  • Protagonist Parallels Between Go Tell It on the Mountain and Catcher in the Rye

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts these two works that both have coming of age themes. The protagonists in each--Holden Caulfield and John Grimes--are discussed in depth in terms of their spiritual and psychological journeys that deal with religion, family and the meaning of life. No additional sources cited.

  • James Joyce's Writings and the Concept of Paralysis

    A 5 page paper which discusses how various stories use the idea of paralysis. The stories presented for contrast and comparison are 'Araby' 'A Little Cloud' 'The Dead' and 'Eveline,' all of which were written by James Joyce. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • A Review of Pat Conroy's Novel, 'The Water is Wide'

    A 5 page review of "The Water is Wide", a novel chronicling the experiences of writer and educator Pat Conroy in 1969 on the near deserted island of Yamacraw off the South Carolina coast. Relates Conroy's trials, tribulations, and successes when charged with educating a largely illiterate group of student consisting of black fifth graders and older students. Recounts his innovative methods and perseverance which serve as an example to educators of the fact that one man can make a difference. No additional sources are listed.

  • The Sane Positivist A Biography of Edward L. Thorndike by Geraldine Joncich

    8 pages in length. Edward Lee Thorndike applied his vast knowledge to several areas of psychology, including learning theory, applied psychology and mental measurement. His primary influence was William James; in turn, his lifetime achievements proved to influence the likes of B.F. Skinner and John B. Watson. Thorndike's accomplishments, which were fundamentally based in animal psychology, are readily chronicled in Geraldine Joncich's "The Sane Positivist: A Biography Of Edward L. Thorndike." Joncich covers every aspect of Thorndike's life and career as it relates to the field of psychology, effectively supplying the reader with the opportunity to gain a much more comprehensive perspective of this scientifically influential man. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparative Thematic Analysis of Raymond Chandler's The Long Goodbye and T.S. Eliot's 'The Waste Land'

    (5 pp) Sometimes the things unite two works of fiction are the most obvious, and so we do not even consider them. Such may be the case with Raymond Chandlers, The Long Goodbye and T.S. Eliot's poem The Wasteland: one is about a mystery, and one is mystery. It would be nice if it were settled that easily, wouldn't it? But not nearly so much fun, as if we see what other elements might tie these diverse appearing works together.

  • 'The Iron' Heel' of Jack London

    (4 pp). A narrator, seven centuries down the road tells us of a "manuscript" he has found. "(In it there are not ) errors of fact, but errors of interpretation." Looking back across the seven centuries that have lapsed since Avis Everhard completed her manuscript, events, and the influence of events, that were confused and veiled to her, are clear to us. She lacked perspective. She was too close to the events she writes about. Nay, she was merged in the events she has described." Through the work of Avis, we get two different versions of the story / history of a massive labor revolution in an unknown country.

  • 'Cinderella' by Anne Sexton

    (5 pp) At a turning point in art history, Marcel Duchamp turned a porcelain urinal, upside down and hung it on the wall, labeling it art, after he signed it "R. Mutt." The supposed sophisticated community at large took that to mean - "whatever I say is art, is art." The same argument could be made for a poet. If the poet says it is a poem. Is it then a poem, or does it have to follow certain structure, form or meaning to get that title? In this discussion we will examine the poem, Cinderella by Anne Sexton, within two categories, meaning and mechanics, and see how it stands on its own.

  • Novel and Cinematic Comparisons of The Great Gatsby

    5 pages in length. When one compares the book version of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” to its movie counterpart, it is quite easy to point out the significant similarities, inasmuch as there was no way for the film director to stray too far from the author’s primary theme and still remain true to the story’s message; as such, the contrasts that one might experience between the two media forms appear to be nothing more than superficial differences that typically separate film from literature. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Comparison of Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne

    (5 pp.) Both of these American writers wanted to do more than entertain people; they wanted to influence how people thought, or how they perceived the world. My premise is that Hawthorne wanted to influence the conscious mind through parable or fable. Poe was more of a mental subterranean, and wanted to reach the unconscious mind, through the doorway of fear. The writer will examine Poe's stories, "The Tell-tale Heart" and "The Oval Portrait," and Hawthorne's short story, "Rappaccinni's Daughter", to determine if they fit the proposed premise. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Temperament in Paul's Case by Willa Cather

    (5 pp.) This story is often used in high school discussions, either as a "jumping off" place for talking about the "choice" of suicide, or an exercise in "cognitive thinking." The writer uses quotes from the story as well as statements from other critics to support the basic thesis statement: Paul's choice of suicide had several contributing factors. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Self-Perception and Learning

    (5 pp) When we first begin to make the effort of learning, or deciding who we are, or who we want to be, we usually have to take into account how others perceive us. Naturally the first who do that are our parents. We have that problem presented in the readings that we have been given: Amy Tann's "Two Kinds," and Danzy Senna's "The Mulatto Millennium." These two works will be used as a basis for the "learning of self."

  • Willy Loman's Nightmarish American Dreams

    (5 pp). Much of the Arthur Miller's play The Death of A Salesman, looks at the loss of one man's idea of the American Dream of success, or 'making it.' It occurs to Willy Loman that he is not making it, as he thought he would, neither are his sons. Loman was so busy focused on himself and his first son, that not much thought is given to his second son, Hap. Happy, who hardly follows the nature of his name, will be the focus of this discussion.

  • David McCullough The Great Bridge

    A 10 page paper which considers the book’s thesis, a review of the contents, what the author accomplished, its strengths and weaknesses, and to whom this book would appeal. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Winkie, Road & Corruption in Society

    A 4 page essay that looks at 2 books. Cormac McCarthy in The Road and Clifford Chase in Winkie offer two very different commentaries on the corruption, narrow-mindedness and hubris that colors the present political and social atmosphere in the United States. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Environment in Literature: Ecocriticism, Ecofeminism and the Concept of Dwelling

    This 15 page paper examines writings by Barbara Kingsolver and Greg Garrard to explore the ways in which authors use, or examine the use of nature in literary works. It pays specific attention to the ecofeminist nature of the heroine of Kingsolver’s book Prodigal Summer, and also considers the concept of dwelling and farming with regard to sustainability. Finally, it defines ecocriticism and illustrates its use.

  • Literature of the New American Republic

    A 9 page research paper that discusses the formation and evolution of American literature. The writer discusses the effect of the Revolution on literature, the factors that influenced, the nature of American identity and westward expansion and the first generation of significant American writers. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Mercerism and Electric Sheep

    This 4 page paper discusses the way “Mercerism” works in Philip K. Dick’s novel, “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • If Shakespeare Wrote Science Fiction, Ariel Would Use a Transporter

    This 4 page paper discusses five short science fiction stories and what it is about each of them that classifies them as being in that genre. It also suggests ways in which Shakespeare could use science fiction techniques and themes to rewrite his play “The Tempest” as a screenplay for Spielberg to direct. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • If Shakespeare Wrote Science Fiction, Ariel Would Use a Transporter

    This 4 page paper discusses five short science fiction stories and what it is about each of them that classifies them as being in that genre. It also suggests ways in which Shakespeare could use science fiction techniques and themes to rewrite his play “The Tempest” as a screenplay for Spielberg to direct. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Laura, In Williams’ Glass Menagerie

    A 3 page essay that discusses the character of Laura from Tennessee Williams’ poignant play “The Glass Menagerie.” There are a number of similarities between Laura Wingfield and the small glass animals that she collects. As with her small glass animals, Laura is fragile, both in health and temperament. Also, like her animals, which are a beautiful expression of art, Laura herself has an ethereal beauty. This metaphor also connects Laura with nature as the shapes of her glass suggest the natural world, which is distant from the play’s urban setting. As this suggests, the glass menagerie itself can be viewed as a metaphor for understanding Laura’s inner nature and Romantic beauty. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Sam Shepard: Cruising Paradise: Tales

    This 3 page paper discusses Sam Shepard’s book “Cruising Paradise: Tales.” Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Significance of Jesus Christ’s Death and Resurrection as Decay and Renewal in William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury

    In nine pages this paper analyzes how the author symbolically represents the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ in the novel and the importance of this religious symbolism to the story of the dysfunctional Compson family and the decline of the Southern aristocracy. Five sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • Native American Oral Tradition: Parallels in the Literature

    A 5 page analysis of Gerald Vizenor's ““Word War in the Word Wards” (a chapter in “Bearheart the Heirship Chronicles”) and “An Insatiable Emptiness” by Evelyn Lau. No additional sources are listed.

  • Edgar Allan Poe, Suicidal Tendencies, and ‘The Tell-Tale Heart’

    In ten pages this paper considers the life of author Edgar Allan Poe, how his works were influenced by his depression and suicidal tendencies, and how suicidal tendencies manifest themselves in his famous short story, ‘The Tell-Tale Heart.’ Ten sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • Everyday Life in Literature

    This 6 page paper discusses ordinary life as depicted in John Updike’s story “A&P,” and then expands on the example of Sammy to include other books, and why they are considered to be realistic literature. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Hagar and Lottie: The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence

    A 5 page paper which discusses the development of the relationship between Hagar and Lottie in Margaret Laurence’s The Stone Angel. No additional sources cited.

  • American Ethnic Literature

    This 7 page paper defines what American ethnic literature is, and what it means, and why it’s important. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Treatment of Women in Literature

    This 5 page paper looks at the way the representation of women has evolved throughout literature, from “Frankenstein” in 1818 to “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,” published in 2005. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • A Rose for Emily

    A 3 page paper on William Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Gatsby & The American Dream

    A 4 page essay that discusses this classic novel. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby overtly concerns the story of a man trying to win back his wartime lover and recreate his idolized version of their affair. However, beneath this romantic plot, there runs a much deeper and more serious theme, which addresses the decay of the American Dream that Fitzgerald witnessed in the years following World War I, which is when the US experienced a period of extreme opulence and sudden wealth. Fitzgerald portrays the American Dream as having been tarnished by the rampant materialism of American culture and its social and moral values. While his theme is evident throughout the novel, it is particularly evident in Fitzgerald’s characterization of Gatsby, Daisy, and Nick, with each character underscoring a different but related point. No additional sources cited.

  • Gary Soto/”Oranges”

    A 3 page explications of “Oranges,” a poem by Gary Soto, which is evocative of innocence, as it tells of the narrator’s experience on his first “date” with a girl. This memory is obviously a profound one for the narrator and the reason for the memory’s significance in this man’s life is largely conveyed through the poem’s lyrical imagery and symbolism. A close reading of the poem and examination of this feature demonstrates this point. No additional sources cited.

  • Gary Soto/”Oranges”

    A 3 page explications of “Oranges,” a poem by Gary Soto, which is evocative of innocence, as it tells of the narrator’s experience on his first “date” with a girl. This memory is obviously a profound one for the narrator and the reason for the memory’s significance in this man’s life is largely conveyed through the poem’s lyrical imagery and symbolism. A close reading of the poem and examination of this feature demonstrates this point. No additional sources cited.

  • Where the Heart Is

    A 5 page paper which discusses the film and the book Where the Heart Is. No additional sources cited.

  • Hunter Thompson/Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    A 7 page analysis of Hunter S. Thompson's 1971 novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which is quasi-autobiographical, as Thompson gives himself and his lawyer, Oscar Acosta, the pseudonyms of Raoul Duke (a Doctor of Journalism) and Dr. Gonzo, who is described as being a 300-pound Samoan. A central premise of this trip to Las Vegas is that tourism can be used as a means for addressing the concept of the American Dream. A surface reading of Thompson's satirical novel tends to see it as celebratory of the 1960's drug culture; however, closer examination of this novel reveals it as a scathing critique of American culture and specifically the American dream, and also a denunciation of the drug culture of the 1960s. No additional sources cited.

  • Linda in Death of a Salesman

    A 3 page analysis of Linda in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. No additional sources cited.

  • An Extra Chapter for “Johnny Tremaine”

    This 3 page paper discusses what a writer might do to create an additional chapter for the children’s book “Johnny Tremaine.”

  • Sexual Imagery/Depression in 3 Poems By Robert Frost

    A 5 page essay that analyzes 3 poems by Frost. Robert Frost is one of America's best-loved poets. His use of evocative and lyrical natural imagery speaks to a broad audience. However, in addition to the folksy wisdom, there is tension in many of Frost's poems that subtly intimates both his battles with lifelong depression, as well as conflicted feelings toward sex. The following examination of 3 of Frost's poems, "Acquainted wit the Night," "The Road Not Taken," and "Birches," demonstrates that below the literal surface meaning of these poems, Frost invites the reader to look deeper into his perception. No additional sources cited.

  • Sexual Imagery/Depression in 3 Poems By Robert Frost

    A 5 page essay that analyzes 3 poems by Frost. Robert Frost is one of America's best-loved poets. His use of evocative and lyrical natural imagery speaks to a broad audience. However, in addition to the folksy wisdom, there is tension in many of Frost's poems that subtly intimates both his battles with lifelong depression, as well as conflicted feelings toward sex. The following examination of 3 of Frost's poems, "Acquainted wit the Night," "The Road Not Taken," and "Birches," demonstrates that below the literal surface meaning of these poems, Frost invites the reader to look deeper into his perception. No additional sources cited.

  • Love in The Horse Dealer’s Daughter by D.H. Lawrence

    A 3 page paper which examines how Lawrence represents love in the short story The Horse Dealer’s Daughter. No additional sources cited.

  • The “Journey Motif” in Literature

    This 6 page paper discusses various journeys, spiritual, psychological and physical, in several works of literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Robert Lowell/Skunk Hour

    A 7 page explication of Robert Lowell's poem "Skunk Hour," which was written in 1959 and describes Lowell's impressions of a Maine sea town (Lowell 131). At the beginning of the poem, that is, the first four stanzas, Lowell describes a sterile, decaying setting, which he tries to lighten with a "tone of tolerance, humor and randomness at the sad prospect" (Lowell 131). However, even in this section of the poem, Lowell's perspective drifts as it "sinks out of sight into the causal, chancy arrangements of nature and decay" (Lowell 131). Then, in the later half of the poem, i.e., the last four stanzas, Lowell's tone dramatically changes as he describes the "dark night" of his soul, which is not "gracious, but secular, puritan and agnostical. An Existentialist night" (Lowell 132). A close reading of this poem demonstrates the accuracy of Lowell's personal assessment of his poem's meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Robert Lowell/Skunk Hour

    A 7 page explication of Robert Lowell's poem "Skunk Hour," which was written in 1959 and describes Lowell's impressions of a Maine sea town (Lowell 131). At the beginning of the poem, that is, the first four stanzas, Lowell describes a sterile, decaying setting, which he tries to lighten with a "tone of tolerance, humor and randomness at the sad prospect" (Lowell 131). However, even in this section of the poem, Lowell's perspective drifts as it "sinks out of sight into the causal, chancy arrangements of nature and decay" (Lowell 131). Then, in the later half of the poem, i.e., the last four stanzas, Lowell's tone dramatically changes as he describes the "dark night" of his soul, which is not "gracious, but secular, puritan and agnostical. An Existentialist night" (Lowell 132). A close reading of this poem demonstrates the accuracy of Lowell's personal assessment of his poem's meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Children’s Perceptions of Adults

    A 3 page paper which examines Robert Hayden’s poem Those Winter Sundays and Constance Squires’ short story Running Out of Music as they relate to children’s perceptions of adults. No additional sources cited.

  • Jay Gatsby and the American Dream

    This 6 page paper argues that F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic American novel, “The Great Gatsby,” praises and condemns the American dream at the same time. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Report: “Teaching the Elephant to Dance”

    This 4 page paper reports on the book “Teaching the Elephant to Dance” by James A. Belasco. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Ezra Pound, "A Virginal"

    A 3 page explication of Ezra Pound's poem "A Virginal" that begins with roughly a page covering the poet's biography and background. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Theme of Death in William Faulkner’s ‘A Rose for Emily’

    In three pages this paper examines how William Faulkner thematically expresses death in his famous short story, ‘A Rose for Emily,’ and how it conveys the overall message that the death of protagonist Emily Grierson also signified the death of the antebellum Southern aristocracy. There are no other sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Learned Gender

    This paper uses Deirdre N. McCloskey’s book “Crossing: A Memoir” to explore the idea that gender can be learned. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Dreamers: Gatsby and Heathcliff

    A 3 page paper which examines who the greater dreamer is, Gatsby from The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald or Heathcliff from Bronte’s Wuthering Heights. No additional sources cited.

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald as Jay Gatsby’s Alter Ego

    This 5 page paper discusses the great similarities between F. Scott Fitzgerald and his character, Jay Gatsby, protagonist of “The Great Gatsby.” Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Analyzing Poet Elizabeth Bishop’s “One Art”

    In six pages this paper presents an analysis and criticism of Elizabeth Bishop’s famous poem, “One Art.” Four sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Sexuality in the Work of Crane and Wharton

    A 3 page paper which compares sexuality in Stephen Crane’s novel Maggie and Edith Wharton’s novel Summer. No additional sources cited.

  • Sexuality in the Work of Crane and Wharton

    A 3 page paper which compares sexuality in Stephen Crane’s novel Maggie and Edith Wharton’s novel Summer. No additional sources cited.

  • Wives and Crime in Trifles and Sweat

    A 5 page paper which examines the women in Susan Glaspell’s Trifles and Zora Neale Hurston’s Sweat. The paper examines the women and discusses whether they should be held accountable for the crimes they committed. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Friedman: “The World Is Flat” (Sort of). Or Maybe It’s Spiky.

    This 12 page paper discusses Thomas Friedman’s popular book “The World Is Flat” and in particular, considers his thinking with regard to faith and its intersection with technology. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Reservation Blues

    A 14 page essay that discusses James W. Johnson's The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man and in Sherman Alexie's Reservation Blues, which are novels in which these authors address issues of race and identity as these subjects pertain to the identities of the main characters and also to the nature of racism, which is interwoven within the warp and weave of current American culture and within its history. In each novel, the authors relate these issues to music and musical expression by exploring the theme that music is both indicative of personal identity, but also an expression of culture, and, therefore, a possible means for bridging the chasms that exist between races. No additional sources cited.

  • Gatsby’s Fantasy

    A 4 page paper which examines Jay Gatsby’s fantasy of reconnecting with Daisy after years of separation in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. No additional sources cited.

  • Spiritual Emptiness in The Rocking Horse Winner, by D.H. Lawrence and A Good Man is Hard to Find, by Flannery O'Connor

    A 6 page paper which examines how each story explores the theme of spiritual emptiness. Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea and Symbolism

    Symbolism in “The Old Man and the Sea”: This 5-page essay examines the novella “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway, while exploring some of its many intrinsic examples of symbolism. Whatever symbolic meaning is the ‘true’ Hemingway meaning of Santiago, (and they may all be true) the quality of this story is that of poetry rather than prose, and the music of its narrative language is the indefinable essence of its dignity. Bibliography lists 3 sources. SNMansea.doc

  • The Rain God: A Desert Tale Viewed Critically

    A 5 page paper which examines the novel’s important issues, describes the major characters, their roles as intended by the author, analyzes what makes them important, what they symbolize, and concludes by discussing the purpose of the novel. No additional sources are used.

  • Richard Peck's 1985 Novel Remembering the Good Times

    (5 pages) This 1985 young adult novel by Richard Peck, could serve as a springboard for all types of discussion and class activity. Thematically the problem of death, particularly that of suicide is not openly addressed. Perhaps, death is our greatest fear, but this can also be an opportunity to examine those things that are frightening to us, and learn to put them into perspective. Teaching that growth can come out of fear is valuable for all ages.

  • Racism, Imagination, and Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

    Toni Morrison's 1970 novel has become a classic definition of the destruction of racism, as well as how one can "cope" through imagination. The power of the tale is staggering, and provides the core of this 5 page discussion.

  • Short Story Comparisons of 'Tickets, Please' by D.H. Lawrence and 'Regret' by Kate Chopin

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of loneliness as presented in both stories. No additional sources are used.

  • Feminist Utopian Literature Represented by Women on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy

    A 6 page paper which the concept of utopia from a feminist context, providing insight into the author’s ideology, with a brief background to consider the times in which the novel was written, and a specific consideration of what makes the novel utopian, in terms of content, form and structure. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Barbara Kingsolver's Pigs in Heaven

    5 pages. Best known for her best-selling book The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver has woven another intricate tale with sympathetic and realistic characters that have an interesting story to tell. Pigs in Heaven is a book steeped in the tradition of the Cherokee Nation, and emphasizes the importance of children maintaining a connection with their culture and the roots of their history. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Theology of Herman Melville in his Writings

    This 5 page paper provides an overview and a contextualization of Herman Melville's religious theology or ideology presented through his short stories. This paper integrates a view of a number of his short stories, including The Piazza, Benito Cereno, and Billy Budd. This paper integrates a view of these fictional texts as a basis for understanding the Puritan perspectives that influenced Melville's development as an author. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Works and Socioeconomics

    This 5 page paper looks at several novels and short stories that demonstrate the idea that socioeconomic variables permeate modern works of literature. Although characters go through spiritual transitions, it is money and status that is the crux of their challenges. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Short Stories by Jack London and the Weather Protagonist

    An 8 page paper which discusses how London used Mother Nature, the weather, as a protagonist in "To Build a Fire" and "Love of Life." Bibliography lists 8 additional sources.

  • Analysis of Robert Frost's Poem 'The Road Less Traveled'

    This 5 page report discusses the short and apparently simple poem “The Road Less Traveled” written by Robert Frost that describes a traveler who chooses between two paths that diverge in the woods. it is clear throughout his writing that Frost also understood that the “order” of nature was such that it defined the very existence of a human being. The poem, “The Road Not Taken,” is an example of how he constantly frames the actions and thinking of a person against the backdrop of the natural world. It also suggests that one’s choices in life can be dependent upon what one sees before them in the natural world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner' and the Character of Paul

    A 5 page paper which examines the short story’s ill-fated young protagonist. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature and Women of High Society

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts James's Daisy Miller with the woman in section 11 of Song of Myself. Social status and behavior are discussed along with a variety of thematic elements. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'The Horse Dealer's Daughter' by D.H. Lawrence and the Theme of Control

    A 5 page paper which takes a particular scene in D.H. Lawrence's "The Horse Dealer's Daughter" and examines how it compares to relationships in the story. The scene involves the narrator's examination of horses, and how they may have little personality of their own and are driven and controlled by the individual with the reins. The paper examines this perspective and relates it to various characters, examining whether they have control or not. No additional sources cited.

  • The Poet Essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson

    This 5 page report discusses “The Poet” (1844) and essay by 19th century American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson. In it, he makes it clear that he has no use for those who he thinks of as “esteemed umpires of taste,” those who are unable to see beyond what is before them to the heart of the art and the beauty of its simple being Bibliography lists one source.

  • Temptations in C.S. Lewis' The Screwtape Letters

    A 5 page outline of the basic theme of this book on Christian theology and the way that many try to undermine that theology through a refocusing of one’s attentions away from their religious commitmants and responsibilities and toward the more sensual things in life. Notes that they only way to overcome such temptation is to carefully maintain your focus on the Christian precept of hope and to recognize that all one needs to do to be ensured their place in the afterlife is to ask for salvation. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Naturalism and Realism in the Literature of the Nineteenth Century

    A seven page paper which looks at the concepts of realism and naturalism in fiction, particularly in relation to Howells' 'The Rise of Silas Lapham' and Dreiser's 'Sister Carrie'. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • D.H. Lawrence's 'The White Stocking' and Ernest Hemingway's 'The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber'

    This 5 page report discusses and compares two short stories -- “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber” (1936) bye Ernest Hemingway and “The White Stocking” by D.H. Lawrence. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • American Literature Trends

    A 5 page research paper that argues that the prevailing trend in American literature has been to question the concepts and assumptions that were prevalent in the past. The world view of past eras was predicated on the notion that some people, typically white males, were superior to others, such as, people of color or anyone female. American authors have consistently questioned previously accepted paradigms of exclusion and privilege. Furthermore, American literature has consistently focused on one of the major activities propagated by those who have power and privilege by questioning the age-old concept of war as something glorious and noble. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses and How Death Was Treated

    5 pages. Examines the symbolism and treatment of death as it appears in Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses. This paper also contains contextual information such as the treatment of death by the Comanche Indians and the Mexicans of that era. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Law Cannot Alter Social Injustices in Harper Lee's 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

    A 5 page paper which discusses the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, illustrating how it indicates that no law can truly change the social injustices experienced by those who are the victim of racism. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • How Shirley Jackson Employs Allegory in Her Tale, 'The Possibility of Evil'

    A 5 page paper which examines Shirley Jackson's tale "The Possibility of Evil" and illustrates how it is a moral fable wherein one should not try to fix the problems of others when the individual has their own problems. No additional sources cited.

  • Feminists Sylvia Plath and Cary Churchill and Their Literary Messages

    An 8 page examination of Plath’s “The Bell Jar” and Churchill’s “Top Girl” and the underlying societal messages. The author of this paper contends that each of these women’s work is largely directed at the injustices of a patriarchal society. The manner in which these women deal with those injustices, however, vary considerably. Each utilizes their personal experiences to form the basis for political critique. While Plath does so from the individualist perspective, however, Churchill approaches said change from a societal standpoint. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Humor Used in the Works of Flannery O'Connor

    An 8 page analysis of four of Flannery O’Connor’s short stories (“A Good Man Is Hard to Find”, “Good Country People”, “Revelation”, and “Parker's Back”). The author of this paper contends that O’Connor utilizes humor to deliver deep and meaningful messages to her readers. Most often her message has deep and profound religious meaning but is made more palatable by O’Connor’s quick wit and phenomenal sense of human behavior. Her success rests to a large degree as well on the reader’s familiarity of the situations and circumstances. Without humor and without familiarity O’Connor would be a literary flop. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Old Age Poetic Portrayals in the Works of Jenny Joseph and Ursula Fanthorpe

    A 5 page contrast of the realities of old age and the plans we often make for our golden years in the throws of the optimism of youth. The author reviews the basic premises of these two poems, one planning outrageous behavior and excesses for her old age and the other bound by his worn out body and mind, to conclude that these two poems are as different as reality and fantasy. As disturbing as it may be to authors like Jenny Joseph, old age is not always a thing which we can plan for. In comparison, “Old Man, Old Man” by Ursula Fanthorpe is a more realistic portrayal of the way that the circumstances of old age, despite all your plans to the contrary, can catch up with you. No additional sources are listed.

  • Old Age Poetic Portrayals in the Works of Jenny Joseph and Ursula Fanthorpe

    A 5 page contrast of the realities of old age and the plans we often make for our golden years in the throws of the optimism of youth. The author reviews the basic premises of these two poems, one planning outrageous behavior and excesses for her old age and the other bound by his worn out body and mind, to conclude that these two poems are as different as reality and fantasy. As disturbing as it may be to authors like Jenny Joseph, old age is not always a thing which we can plan for. In comparison, “Old Man, Old Man” by Ursula Fanthorpe is a more realistic portrayal of the way that the circumstances of old age, despite all your plans to the contrary, can catch up with you. No additional sources are listed.

  • A Review of Coyote Blue

    A 5 page paper which discusses how Sam Hunter's position as successful and content indicates how good things never last when one is not truly righteous. The book is "Coyote Blue" by Christopher Moore. Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • Comparing Kate Chopin Tales 'The Story of an Hour' and 'Desiree's Baby'

    A 7 page paper which critically examines how these stories represent Chopin’s efforts to reflect her own life in her art, how they are innovative feminist critiques (such as gender stereotypes and oppression) of the social conventions that were defined and maintained by the American patriarchy. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Edgar Allan Poe's 'Fall of the House of Usher,' Art and Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the poem "The Haunted Palace" and other literary and artistic works presented in the house in the story "The Fall of the House of Usher" by Edgar Allan Poe. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Edgar Allan Poe's 'Fall of the House of Usher,' Art and Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the poem "The Haunted Palace" and other literary and artistic works presented in the house in the story "The Fall of the House of Usher" by Edgar Allan Poe. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • A Review of Eight Million Ways to Die

    A 5 page book report on Lawrence Block's "Eight Million Ways to Die." No additional sources cited.

  • Real Courage and Its Essence in 1984 by George Orwell

    5 pages in length. Will people have the courage to stand up for their hard earned democracy and intrinsic human rights if they one day find themselves forced to do so? It is a scary thing to imagine how one might react to forced authoritarianism after a lifetime of democracy, but one only has to think back to Hitler's regime to understand how power can get completely out of control, no matter how hard the populace fights against its takeover. George Orwell's "1984" speaks to the inherent nature of power and courage, two concepts that become interwoven as the book's hapless characters struggle to maintain their existence beneath overwhelming oppression. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Mary McCarthy on the American Dream of Willy Loman

    This 5 page paper looks at the assumption that Willy Loman is just a product of America, and argues that such is not the case. Mary McCarthy's views are used as a springboard for discussion. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • American Literature's Romantic Movement

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the Romantic movement in American literature. The While the Romantic movement throughout the world reflected the importance of nature and self-realization within man, the American Romantic movement was much more individualistic in its approach and its heroes were filled with risk which removed them from the norms of society. Probably the most popular and influential of the American Romantic writers was Ralph Waldo Emerson but other great writers of the time were Henry Thomas Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, William Ellery Channing, Hermann Melville, Mark Twain and Edgar Allan Poe. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'The Gift Outright' by Robert Frost

    This 6 page report discusses 1942 poem by Robert Frost titled “The Gift Outright.” He recited it at the inauguration ceremony for President John F. Kennedy in 1961. The poem opens by describing the fact that the early settlers in the North American colonies thought of the land they were cultivating as simply “their” land and continues in only 16 lines to show the connection between Americans and the land mass that is the United States. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • H.G. Bissinger's Friday Night Lights A Town, a Team, a Dream

    A 5 page discussion of the underlying philosophy of win-win at any costs which author Bissinger exposes has resulted in significant social problems in Odessa Texas, the home of the Permian Panthers. At the same time, however, this philosophy is not unique to Odessa. It permeates high school sports across the nation and has the potential for phenomenal societal costs. No additional sources are listed.

  • 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence, 'Everyday Use' by Alice Walker and Families

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts the families in Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” and D.H. Lawrence’s “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” No additional sources cited.

  • Controversial Literature: Huck Finn

    5 pages in length. Controversial may well be the first word used to describe Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn long before any summary is offered. Peppered with the words "racist" and "sympathizer," any synopsis of this book would be remiss without also mentioning the legacy of debate Twain - perhaps purposely - left behind. To look at either the character or story of Huck Finn as anything but a social mirror is to read more into Twain's meaning, however, public construal continues to be divided as to the author's true intent. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Slavery

    A 5 page paper which examines the impact Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe made in relationship to the abolition of slavery. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Frankenstein

    A 6 page paper which analyzes Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Southern Literature and Themes of Communication Lacks and Self Absorption

    An eight page paper surveying seven works of fiction by six different authors. The paper argues that because Southern heritage is so concerned with maintaining traditions and external forms of behavior (such as claustrophobic family ties), the Southern way of life invites its citizenry to live inauthentic lives. Specific authors and works discussed include William Faulkner's 'The Sound and the Fury,' Robert Penn Warren's 'All the King's Men,' Eudora Welty's 'The Wide Net' and 'Why I Live at the P.O.', Carson McCullers' 'Member of the Wedding,' Walker Percy's 'The Moviegoer,' and Flannery O'Connor's 'The River.' Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • The 20s and 30s and Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines the characteristics of literature between the world wars. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Yellow Wallpaper and The White Heron

    This 4 page paper compares and contrasts The Yellow Wallpaper and The White Heron. The common elements are explored in this thesis paper. No additional sources cited.

  • Alienation in Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines the alienation that the protagonists experience in Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, Hunter S. Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Kurt Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions, and J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. No sources cited.

  • Beach’s Run Silent, Run Deep

    A 4 page book report on Robert Beach’s novel Run Silent, Run Deep. No additional sources cited.

  • Characterization as a Literary Technique

    This 5 page paper examines the way in which authors use characterization to intrigue readers. It uses “Hamlet,” “Othello” and “The Story of an Hour” as examples. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Rocket Boys by Homer Hickham

    This 5 page paper discusses the book “Rocket Boys” (also called “October Sky”) and why Homer Hickham wrote it. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • DOUBLE STANDARD BY ELLEN WATKINS HARPER

    This 3-page paper discusses how Ellen Watkins Harper's poem "The Double Standard" explores the relationship between the sexes during the 19th century.

  • DOUBLE STANDARD BY ELLEN WATKINS HARPER

    This 3-page paper discusses how Ellen Watkins Harper's poem "The Double Standard" explores the relationship between the sexes during the 19th century.

  • DOUBLE STANDARD BY ELLEN WATKINS HARPER

    This 3-page paper discusses how Ellen Watkins Harper's poem "The Double Standard" explores the relationship between the sexes during the 19th century.

  • A Rose for Emily by Faulkner

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the character of Emily was severely controlled by the gender conditions inherently possessed in the time period and the region of the South. Mention is made of Judith Fetterly's essay titled "A Rose for "A Rose For Emily." Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Analysis of 4 poems by Robert Frost

    This 3 page essay offers analysis of four poem by Robert Frost that the writer argues reflect how Frost was influenced by his era.

  • Erikson as Applied to Poe

    A 6 page paper. The writer uses some of the little of what is known about Poe's behaviors and events in his early life to discuss his personality development according to Erikson's theory. The Black Cat is the story used for examples. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy

    4 pages in length. The apocalyptic resonance of McCarthy's The Road can be interpreted in any one of myriad ways from a forewarning of the impending fallout from post-911 to the never-ending question of God's existence, however, what truly echo time and time again throughout the story is how mankind's unyielding push into technological advancement will ultimately render the planet barren once humanity has overstepped the line into dangerous knowledge. That the father and son are still alive in the aftermath of such complete desecration speaks to the need for man's self-destruction -– along with the devastation of all other life forms – to be chronicled in some way other than through excavation a millennia from now. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • "I Stand Here Ironing" And "Fever Flower" Mother Daughter Relationships

    3 pages in length. The shared theme in Tillie Olsen's I Stand Here Ironing and Shirley Ann Grau's Fever Flower draws upon the mother/daughter relationship and how –- in light of emotional, economic and social stumbles that preclude a psychologically healthy upbringing – forever shape the confused and disappointed views portrayed by the characters. Raising a child, as Olsen's protagonist clearly points out, is fraught with unseen challenges just waiting to trip up even the best intentions; when poverty and culturally-imposed mandates interfere with the unidentified mother's capacity to meet such overwhelming challenges with heartfelt love as her only resource, the only viable alternative is to sever the mother/daughter relationship. Grau, who by comparison illustrates how just the opposite situation can be equally ineffective in raising an emotionally stable child, makes it clear how wealth and status are not ingredients for a stable, nurturing home life, particularly when the mother is emotionally absent from her own daughter's developmental years. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Reality of Ligeia

    This 7 page paper analyzes the theme of premature burial in Poe’s short story Ligeia, as well as discussing how it relates to real-world psychology. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Interpretation Of Claims Made In "The Da Vinci Code"

    10 pages in length. A fictional story based within a factual premise is not typically an alarming dichotomy within the literary world, however, when the topic at hand is religion - more precisely the Bible's legitimacy and accuracy - the coupling elicits a tremendous chorus of disapproval particularly when the purported "truth" is collectively argued to be the author's own fabrications. Even more infuriating to the truly pious, however, is how Dan Brown – author of the highly criticized The Da Vinci Code – maintains through the most blistering accusations of intentional falsehood that his fact-finding research he performed for the story uncovered these valid truths. The extent to which Brown's assertions have reverberated throughout the global religious community is both grand and far-reaching; that the author stands firm upon his convictions of fact speaks to the ongoing debates as to whether Brown actually believes his own lies or if he is merely perpetuating them for the benefit of publicity. Despite the reason, Brown continues to stir the flames of heresy where any God-fearing Christian is concerned. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Patterns' of Life and in the Poem by Amy Lowell

    In three pages this paper analyzes the poem’s language, rhyme, meaning, images, and symbolism. There are no additional sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Uncle Tom’s Cabin as Protest Literature

    This 4 page paper discusses Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel of slavery, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Judith Ortiz Cofer's Story of First Love

    This 3 page paper explores the short story by Judith Ortiz Cofer. The contention is made that the young protagonist is enslaved by her hormones. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Role of Candy in Mice and Men

    A 3 pages essay that discusses the role of Candy in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. No additional sources cited.

  • Lacking Conviction in Sexual Intimacy in "Sex without Love" by Sharon Olds and "Lust" by Susan Minot

    In three pages this explication examines the theme of intimacy without conviction in Susan Minot’s short story and in Sharon Olds’ poem. There are no additional sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Lacking Conviction in Sexual Intimacy in "Sex without Love" by Sharon Olds and "Lust" by Susan Minot

    In three pages this explication examines the theme of intimacy without conviction in Susan Minot’s short story and in Sharon Olds’ poem. There are no additional sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Gabriel's Embracing of Homosexuality in The Fur Queen

    This 6 page paper addresses the tricker as an inspiration in Highway's novel, The Fur Queen. It is the trickster, and the star seed image that helps Gabriel deal with his life and become whole. Bibliography lists 4 references.

  • This 3-page paper discusses how Edgar Allan Poe uses various attributes that encompass Gothic literature. There are 2 sources cited.

  • A Rose for Emily

    A 4 page paper which examines the symbolic meaning, significance, of the rose in A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Faulkner: Spotted Horses and Barn Burning

    This 3 page paper discusses the way in which Faulkner handles deception in his short story Barn Burning and his novella Spotted Horses. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature Sampler

    This 10 page paper discusses four different fictional works, including two plays, Macbeth and The Hairy Ape, and two short stories, The Necklace and The Cabuliwallah. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Human Experience In Literature

    This 4 page paper compares and contrasts three stories that best illustrate either representations of common human experience, or are least representative of it. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature in America

    A 3 page paper which examines the American experience through literature. The novels examined are To Kill a Mockingbird, The Grapes of Wrath, and Call of the Wild.. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin

    A 6 page essay that first of all describes to the student researching this subject (in one paragraph) why the student's proposed thesis that Louise Mallard in Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour" committed suicide and why the writer chose the alternate thesis that she was murdered. The writer then offers an argument that explains and supports this thesis, which relies on the idea that while the murder was inadvertent, it nevertheless was the sight of her husband alive that shocked Louse into a fatal heart attack. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Humanity Both Good and Evil on The Road

    This 3 page paper reviews the book The Road by Cormac McCarthy and argues that humanity is a mixture of good and evil. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literature and Film Related to Rural Life

    This 3 page paper looks at rural life through films such as Field of Dreams and books like Gone With the Wind. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature and Film Related to Rural Life

    This 3 page paper looks at rural life through films such as Field of Dreams and books like Gone With the Wind. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Death in Venice and Him with His Foot in His Mouth

    This 12 page paper discusses the characters of Gustav von Aschenbach in Death in Venice and Doctor Shawmut in Him with His Foot in His Mouth. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Scarlet Letter Symbolism

    A 3 page paper which examines symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter. No additional sources cited.

  • Childrens Literature The 2011 Newberry Medal and Caldecott Medal

    This 3 page paper reviews the books by Clare Vanderpool and Erin E. Stead, the winners of the 2011 Newberry Medal and Caldecott Medal. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Mending Wall by Robert Frost

    A 4 page essay that explicates "Mending Wall," a poem by Robert Frost. The writer argues that Frost envisions the task of mending the wall between himself and his neighbor as an extended metaphor that protests the blind acceptance of ideas. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • "The last Night that She Lived:" An Analysis of Comprehending Death According to Emily Dickinson

    In three pages this paper summarizes and analyzes Emily Dickinson’s poem, “The last Night that She lived.” The bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Analysis of Excerpt from Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

    This 6 page essay analyzes and discusses an excerpt from Toni Morrison's novel The Bluest Eye. The writer argues that this excerpt concisely sums up the novel's main thematic context. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • A Poem by Frost

    This 3 page paper provides an overview of one poem by Robert Frost, with a particular look at form, language, content, and other dimensions found to be engaging. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • I am Legend/Matheson

    A 3 page essay that discusses the way in which Robert Neville perceives his identity over the course of the novel. No additional sources cited.

  • Early Feminist Literature - An Examination of Themes

    This is a 6 page paper that provides an overview of early feminist literature. Stories included are "The Yellow Wallpaper", "The Interpreter of Maladies", "The Storm", and "The Chrysanthemums". Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Wharton's "Ethan Frome" and the Concept of "Duty"

    This is a 3 page paper that provides an overview of "duty" in "Ethan Frome". Other works such as "The Scarlet Letter" and the works of Do-Ho Suh are cited to provide illumination of the theme. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick

    A 7 page research paper/essay that discusses the main themes, symbolism and imagery of Philip K. Dick's novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, which portrays a futuristic society in a decaying post-nuclear holocaust world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • "The Great Gatsby" and Existential Values

    This is a 4 page paper that provides an overview of "The Great Gatsby". The greatness of Jay Gatsby is explored in existential terms. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • American Literature and Major Common Themes

    This 3 page paper consists of notes taken to demonstrate the major themes in the following works: Miller's Death of a Salesman, Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, and Morrison's The Bluest Eye. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Modern Native American Literature and Cultural Conflict

    An 11 page discussion of cultural conflict as is evidenced in Thomas King’s “Green Grass, Running Water”, Leslie Marmon Silko’s “Ceremony”, Gerald Vizenor’s “The Heirs of Columbus”, and Sherman Alexie’s “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven”. The author notes the underlying theme of the differences in the way the environment is viewed by Native Americans verses Non-Natives and suggests that in pre-contact cultures the villain in Native American stories took the form of witchcraft while in contemporary literature it takes the form of non-Natives. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Child and Adult Voices in Literature for Children

    A nine page paper which looks at the significance of the adult and child voice in three works of children's literature: Alice in Wonderland, Little Women and The Secret Garden. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Twentieth Century Literature and Gender

    This 7 page paper looks at gender, but also at class and race, in two works that focus on strong women who lived in the United States during the early part of the twentieth century. Hurston's Their eyes were watching God and Wharton's House of Mirth are each discussed. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • William Bradford and Captain John Smith as Examples of American Colonial Writers

    This is a 5 page paper comparing the writers Captain John Smith and William Bradford. Early colonial American writers were known for their optimistic look at the new world and described America as not only the new world but as pure, virgin and a place for opportunity and dreams. Their writings reflected the colonist view away from the restrictions of British society. Captain John Smith was considered one of the first historians ever to document the colonists’ experiences in his writings about his time at Jamestown and his travels throughout New England. Using a fairly simple and open narrative, he provided detailed maps and descriptions of the areas in addition to adventurous tales of his own and others. William Bradford who was one of the original arrivals in Plymouth on the Mayflower also wrote of his experiences in the new world but his text was based largely on his Puritan faith and compared their quest heavily to that of Paul’s in the Bible. Despite Bradford’s more sober style of writing, he also saw the new world as a land of opportunity as did Smith and the other colonists. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Symbolism of the Coyote in The Tortilla Curtain by T.C. Boyle

    This is a 6 page paper discussing the symbolism as portrayed by the coyote as similar to that of the American attitude toward illegal immigrants in the United States. T.C. Boyle’s “The Tortilla Curtain” tells an effective story of illegal immigration in Southern California. While he tells the story of several characters throughout the novel he best depicts the feelings of the characters symbolically by paralleling the story of the immigrants as comparable to the coyotes which continuously intrude into the yards of the residents in the community. By using the coyote symbolism, Boyle best expresses the duality felt by the characters and by American citizens in general in that many feel that the illegal immigrants are intruding upon their “space” in the United States and arriving impoverished and hungry while at the same time everybody understands that the immigrants, and the coyotes, only cross the border in hopes for rewards of a better life because of it. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Poetry, Literature, and Justice and Freedom Themes

    A 5 page paper which examines a common theme in two pieces of literature and two pieces of poetry. The theme discussed is that of freedom and the works are “The Conversion of the Jews” by Philip Roth, “A Room of One’s Own” by Virginia Woolf, “Ego Tripping (There May Be a Reason Why)” by Nikki Giovanni, and “How We Carry Ourselves” by Jimmy Santiago Baca. No additional sources cited.

  • Emily Dickinson and the Poems of Fascicle Twenty-Eight

    A 14 page research paper that examines the poems in fascicle 28, a division that refers to packets of poems that Dickinson grouped together herself. The writer offers a brief explication of each poem, emphasizing thematic content and how the individual poems fit with the overall pattern. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Emily Dickinson and the Poems of Fascicle Twenty-Eight

    A 14 page research paper that examines the poems in fascicle 28, a division that refers to packets of poems that Dickinson grouped together herself. The writer offers a brief explication of each poem, emphasizing thematic content and how the individual poems fit with the overall pattern. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Wood Pile' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page explication of Robert Frost's poem "The Wood-Pile." The writer summarizes the poem, and then examines it closely, line by line, as to Frost's use of poetic devices, as well as the poem's thematic meaning. No additional sources cited.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Wood Pile' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page explication of Robert Frost's poem "The Wood-Pile." The writer summarizes the poem, and then examines it closely, line by line, as to Frost's use of poetic devices, as well as the poem's thematic meaning. No additional sources cited.

  • Love and Marriage Disappointments

    A 5 page paper which examines “A Story of an Hour” by , “A Doll’s House” by Ibsen, and three poems as they present the reader with a look at the disappointments often found in love and marriage. The poems discussed are “Aunt Jennifer’s Tiger” and “Moving in Winter” by Adrienne Rich and “Ex-Husband” by Gabriel Spera. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Author Stephen Crane and the Naturalist Literary Genre

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the naturalism genre in literature and writer Stephen Crane. American writer Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was well known for his naturalist style during his time. Naturalism in literature was a philosophy used by writers to describe humans in regards to the influences and interactions within their own environments. The characters described in naturalist literature were usually in dire surroundings and often from the middle to lower classes. Despite their circumstances however, humans within naturalist literature were able to eventually overcome their situations by some form of courage or heroism which Crane found to be consistent in all of the cultures and setting he studied. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Women's and Men's Roles in American Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the roles that men and women played in the literature of Colonial America and the New Republic. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • D.H. Lawrence's 'Horse Dealer's Daughter' and the Character of Mabel

    A 5 page paper which examines the character of Mabel in “Horse Dealer’s Daughter.” The paper focuses on three elements of her character which help to define the character’s role. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • Captivity of Women in A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson and The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper

    This is a 6 page paper on a comparison of Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” and Rowlandson’s “A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson” in regards to strength, sexuality and purity. James Fenimore Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” and Mary Rowlandson’s “A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson” both tell stories of female captives during the Indian colonial wars in the Eastern U.S. In Cooper’s work of fiction, he tells the story of Cora Munro and how she provides the strength needed to allow her pure sister to survive their captivity. Cora is of mixed blood but still finds the idea of marrying Magua the Huron “morally repugnant”. Cooper was also criticized after the publication of the work in his insinuation of doubting the purity of the colonists. Rowlandson’s true account of her own captivity stressed that she found her strength to survive her ordeal through the purity of the Psalms of the Puritan religion. Rowlandson’s strength came from her religion whereas Cora’s came from within herself and her use of her powerful sexuality: the colonist ideals remain intact however as Rowlandson survived and the impure Cora dies. These ideals of the importance of pure blood lines are still seen today in the rapes which are reported during wartime in Joanne Barkan’s article on the Serbian rape camps of Yugoslavia which were meant to bring impurity to the blood lines of the Muslims. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Stephen Crane's Maggie A Girl of the Streets and Women's Opportunities

    A 5 page paper which examines the position of Maggie in Stephen Crane’s “Maggie: A Girl of the Streets” in relationship to opportunities available for women at the turn of the century. The paper argues that while there were opportunities in some parts of the country, Maggie’s environment and position in society were such that there were no options for her. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparision of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure and Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. While each novel features an independently minded female protagonist, the writer argues that there are distinct differences between them as well, specifically focusing on the topic of marriage and sexuality. No additional sources cited.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Gender

    A 5 page paper which examines how gender is presented, in “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald and “The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway, as it relates to American identity. No additional sources cited.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Gender

    A 5 page paper which examines how gender is presented, in “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald and “The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway, as it relates to American identity. No additional sources cited.

  • Religion and Sex Views of Walt Whitman

    A 6 page discussion of the manner in which this noted nineteenth century poet viewed religion and the subject of sex. The author of this paper presents several quotes from Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” These quotes reveal not only the graphic sexual content of Whitman’s work but also demonstrate the poet’s apparent belief that religion was only valid in a non-judgmental sense in that it reflected one’s own inner feelings. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence

    A 6 page paper which examines elements of the supernatural, irony, and symbolism seen in D.H. Lawrence’s short story “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” No additional sources cited.

  • Role of the Governess in The Turn of the Screw by Henry Jam

    A seven page paper which offers a stylistic analysis of the governess's role in Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, with reference to participants and processes, deixis, modality and other examples of stylistic devices.

  • 'The Children's Hour' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    A 5 page research paper that critically analyzes Longfellow's poem "The Children's Hour." The writer argues that this poem speaks directly to feelings that are basic to all humanity and this is why his verse, although no longer critically acclaimed, is so well loved and read throughout the world. The writer also discusses Longfellow's reputation and how his work is regarded. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'The Children's Hour' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    A 5 page research paper that critically analyzes Longfellow's poem "The Children's Hour." The writer argues that this poem speaks directly to feelings that are basic to all humanity and this is why his verse, although no longer critically acclaimed, is so well loved and read throughout the world. The writer also discusses Longfellow's reputation and how his work is regarded. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Color Purple and Catcher in the Rye Compared

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares Alice Walker's The Color Purple and J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye. The writer argues that these novels share common characteristics because they both feature the voices of young adolescents as their protagonists. The writer contrasts the emotional growth and maturity of each protagonists, while also comparing their basic plot lines. No additional sources cited.

  • American Society in Three Literary Views

    A 7 page essay that contrasts and compares three works: Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall," Mark Twain's "Corn-Pone Opinions," and Countee Cullen's poem "Incident." The writer argues that in each case, the author endeavors to reflect to the American people certain aspects of society that are contradictory to the prejudices that were evident during the time when these works were created. In other words, these works reflect aspects of the society in which they were created and, in doing so, provide a critique of that society. No additional sources cited.

  • Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five and Yon Yonson's Cyclic Poem

    A 6 page paper which examines how the Yon Yonson poem in Kurt Vonnegut’s novel “Slaughterhouse Five” essentially reflects the narrative and structural form of the story. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • James McBride's The Color of Water and Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts the themes offered by Amy Tan in “The Joy Luck Club” and James McBride in “The Color of Water.” No additional sources cited.

  • James P. Gray's Why Our Drug Laws Have Failed and What We Can Do About It ”: A Discussion of the Premises of Author James P Gray in Comparison to the Philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Machiavelli, Locke, Hobbes, and Ro

    A 5 page exploration of the question of whether drug laws are serving a positive societal function. Gray contends that not only are drug laws ineffective, they are counterproductive and potentially devastating. This contention is evaluated in light of the contentions of numerous other philosophers. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literary Social Criticism

    A 5 page essay that analyzes Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Henry David Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience," and Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" as examples of literature in which the author provides social criticism. The writer asserts that in each of these works, the author argues, not only that an individual can fight the system, but also that it is his or her duty to do so. No additional sources cited.

  • Zora Neale Hurston's 'The Gilded Six Bits' and Alice Walker's 'Everyday Use'

    This 5 page paper analyzes Walker's "Everyday Use" and Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits". Specifically, this paper highlights their portrayal of women, black-on-black issues and mother-child relationships. Bibliography lists 0 sources.

  • Literature and the Use of Newspapers

    A 10 page paper which examines the use of newspapers in literature. The texts discussed are “Sister Carrie” by Theodore Dreiser and “Manhattan Transfer” by John Dos Passos. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Literary Analysis of Jeffrey Eugenides' The Virgin Suicides and Timothy Findley's Not Wanted on the Voyage

    A 6 page paper which compares and contrasts the authors, their writing styles, they ways in which they convey themes, symbols, storylines, settings and characterizations and, in particular, considers the role of women in their respective novels. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • 'The Death of the Moth' by Virginia Woolf

    This 5 page paper is a discussion of Woolf's essay, "The Death of the Moth". This paper examines how eloquently Woolf speaks of death and how the death of the moth can be likened to how human beings should value life. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Emily Dickinson's Views of Self and Society

    A 5 page essay that examines three of Dickinson's poems that deal with the self, how Dickinson saw herself and her society, "I'm Nobody! Who are You?," "Much Madness is divinest Sense," "The Soul selects her own Society." The writer argues that these poems give the reader insight into the remarkable personality of this nineteenth century poet. No additional sources cited.

  • Emily Dickinson's Views of Self and Society

    A 5 page essay that examines three of Dickinson's poems that deal with the self, how Dickinson saw herself and her society, "I'm Nobody! Who are You?," "Much Madness is divinest Sense," "The Soul selects her own Society." The writer argues that these poems give the reader insight into the remarkable personality of this nineteenth century poet. No additional sources cited.

  • A Reading of Emily Dickinson's 'After Great Pain…'

    A 5 page essay that offers an explication of Dickinson's poem "After Great Pain a Formal Feeling Comes." The writer argues that, in this poem, Dickinson indicates the various stages of recovery from traumatic pain. Her verse delineates the various stages that an individual goes through after experiencing great pain: the philosophical questions that one asks; the mechanical feeling of detachment; and, also, that the pain eventually ceases, if one survives it. No additional sources cited.

  • A Reading of Emily Dickinson's 'After Great Pain…'

    A 5 page essay that offers an explication of Dickinson's poem "After Great Pain a Formal Feeling Comes." The writer argues that, in this poem, Dickinson indicates the various stages of recovery from traumatic pain. Her verse delineates the various stages that an individual goes through after experiencing great pain: the philosophical questions that one asks; the mechanical feeling of detachment; and, also, that the pain eventually ceases, if one survives it. No additional sources cited.

  • Tartt's The Secret History and the 'Fatal Flaw' Concept

    A five page paper which considers the concept of the 'fatal flaw' in Tartt's "The Secret History" and the way that their fascination with the darker side of the picturesque affects the lives of Richard and the others. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature, Female Characters, and the Theme of Phenomenal Women

    A 5 page discussion of the theme of phenomenal women as reflected in the female characters of Andrienne Rich, Joyce Carol Oates, Marge Piercy, Maya Angelou, Linda Paston, and Susan Glaspell. This paper acknowledges each of these authors and their female characters as having a positive role not only in the personal development of the author but also in the development of the world as a whole. They are, indeed, phenomenal women. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Dakota A Spiritual Geography by Kathleen Norris

    This is a 5 page analysis of Kathleen Norris’ “Dakota: A Spiritual Geography”. Tutorial language appears throughout the text in square brackets as an aid for writers in their analysis. Kathleen Norris’ 1993 book “Dakota: A Spiritual Geography” relates the spiritual journey and shift Norris and her husband have experienced since moving to South Dakota twenty years ago to tend the family farm. Although a Protestant, she has become an oblate to the local Benedictine monastery and has come to appreciate their isolated and peaceful existence. Norris and the monks’ spirituality are heavily connected to the landscape which is beautifully described by Norris’ poetic and artistic hand but it is a landscape and an existence which must be chosen by an individual in order to be appreciated according to Norris. In a time when materialism and wealth seem to have become prevalent motivators in the world, Norris reveals to readers how spiritually satisfying her life has become as she has been able to center herself in relation to her landscape and the community she has adopted. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Ernest Hemingway's 'Hills Like White Elephants' and White Elephant Symbolism

    A 4 page paper which examines the symbolic nature of white elephants in Ernest Hemingway’s short story “Hills Like White Elephants.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Influences of Nature and Biography in the Works of Emily Dickinson

    This is a 5 page paper discussing Emily Dickinson and two poems from her Nature class. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) wrote well over 2,000 poems during her life in Amherst, Massachusetts but only seven were published while she was still alive. After her death, her poems were classified and published. Dickinson was heavily influenced by several factors in her life: the religion of her father, the impact of the Civil War, and nature. A look at two poems from her “Nature” class shows how Dickinson combines all of these symbolic elements to depict a time of loneliness, longing and false hope. Although the poems describe a time in nature when summer is just out of reach, the meanings run much deeper for Dickinson and her readers, as for her summer is a time of life, fruitfulness and happiness which has been lost. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Influences of Nature and Biography in the Works of Emily Dickinson

    This is a 5 page paper discussing Emily Dickinson and two poems from her Nature class. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) wrote well over 2,000 poems during her life in Amherst, Massachusetts but only seven were published while she was still alive. After her death, her poems were classified and published. Dickinson was heavily influenced by several factors in her life: the religion of her father, the impact of the Civil War, and nature. A look at two poems from her “Nature” class shows how Dickinson combines all of these symbolic elements to depict a time of loneliness, longing and false hope. Although the poems describe a time in nature when summer is just out of reach, the meanings run much deeper for Dickinson and her readers, as for her summer is a time of life, fruitfulness and happiness which has been lost. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Critical Reading of a Passage from Chuck Palahniuk's Fight Club

    This 2.5 page paper focuses on one passage in this book by Chuck Palahniuk. The narrator has just been beaten in a fight, he and Tyler can see his image in the blood on the floor. This paper is an interpretation of this scene based on the Bible. The writer offers an analogy of the image of the narrator and Veronica's veil. Veronica was the woman who wiped Christ's face at Cavalry. The writer also provides an analogy between the rules of the club and the Ten Commandments. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Song' by Allen Ginsberg, 'Story of an Hour' by Kate Chopin, and Love

    A 5 page paper which examines love in the short story “Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin. The idea of love is discussed in relationship to the poem “Song” by Allen Ginsberg. No additional sources cited.

  • Anita Shreve's The Weight of Water

    A 7 page paper which examines the novel’s plot, narration, characters, themes, writing style and historical accuracy. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Live Burial Theme in Edgar Allan Poe's Writings

    This 7 page paper discusses the use of 'live burial' as a theme in Edgar Alan Poe's, Cask of Amontillado, Fall of the House of Usher, Annabelle Lee, and others. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam

    This 4 page paper reviews Hickam's Rocket Boys. Brief synopsis included. Analyzed for theme and content. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literary and Poetic Examples of True Love

    A 5 page paper which examines what true love is as described by literature and poetry. The paper discusses Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116,” Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “How Do I Love Thee?,” Bernard Malamud’s “The Magic Barrel,” Judith Viorst’s “True Love,” and Linda Pastan’s “Love Poem.” No additional sources cited.

  • Literary and Poetic Examples of True Love

    A 5 page paper which examines what true love is as described by literature and poetry. The paper discusses Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116,” Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “How Do I Love Thee?,” Bernard Malamud’s “The Magic Barrel,” Judith Viorst’s “True Love,” and Linda Pastan’s “Love Poem.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Secret History by Donna Tartt, Alfred Hitchcock's Rope and Education

    A 6 page paper which examines the theme of education in Alfred Hitchcock’s film “Rope” and Donna Tartt’s novel “The Secret History.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Overview of 'The Tell Tale Heart' by Edgar Allan Poe

    A 2 1/2 page paper which examines Edgar Allen Poe’s short story “The Tell Tale Heart.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver and Applicatioins of Erik Erikson and Lawrence Kohlberg's Theories

    This is a 7 page paper discussing Kohlberg and Erikson’s developmental stages as reflected in Rachel from “The Poisonwood Bible”. In Barbara Kingsolver’s 1999 novel “The Poisonwood Bible” the fifteen year old daughter, Rachel, reflects primarily Lawrence Kohlberg’s “conventional” level of moral reasoning and the progression from Erik Erikson’s “identity versus role confusion” (stage 5) to “intimacy versus isolation” (stage 6) levels of personality development. Rachel is considered the most self-absorbed of the characters within the novel and because of this her perspective remains primarily a selfish one and how her family’s environment and values impact her life and development. However, from Rachel, readers can also see a development in her awareness of her surroundings and although she remains still fairly self-absorbed she at least realizes how little impact her and her family and their Christian intentions have on the social and physical environment of the Congo showing a maturity of her moral and personal development. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver and Applicatioins of Erik Erikson and Lawrence Kohlberg's Theories

    This is a 7 page paper discussing Kohlberg and Erikson’s developmental stages as reflected in Rachel from “The Poisonwood Bible”. In Barbara Kingsolver’s 1999 novel “The Poisonwood Bible” the fifteen year old daughter, Rachel, reflects primarily Lawrence Kohlberg’s “conventional” level of moral reasoning and the progression from Erik Erikson’s “identity versus role confusion” (stage 5) to “intimacy versus isolation” (stage 6) levels of personality development. Rachel is considered the most self-absorbed of the characters within the novel and because of this her perspective remains primarily a selfish one and how her family’s environment and values impact her life and development. However, from Rachel, readers can also see a development in her awareness of her surroundings and although she remains still fairly self-absorbed she at least realizes how little impact her and her family and their Christian intentions have on the social and physical environment of the Congo showing a maturity of her moral and personal development. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime and History

    A 5 page paper which discusses some of the historical perspectives, regarding the Progressive Era, presented in E.L. Doctorow’s novel “Ragtime.” Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Richard Wilbur's Poem 'Love Calls Us to the Things of This World'

    An Explanation of the Poem by Richard Wilbur A 3 page discussion of Wilbur’s poem. The author of this paper provides a detailed discussion of the poet’s choice of words and discusses how this choice serves as a contrast between the spiritual and the earthly aspects of human existence. No additional sources are listed.

  • Richard Wilbur's Poem 'Love Calls Us to the Things of This World'

    An Explanation of the Poem by Richard Wilbur A 3 page discussion of Wilbur’s poem. The author of this paper provides a detailed discussion of the poet’s choice of words and discusses how this choice serves as a contrast between the spiritual and the earthly aspects of human existence. No additional sources are listed.

  • Poetic Portrayals of Icarus's Fall

    A 4 page review of the poems “Musee des Beaux” by W.H. Auden, “Landscape With the Fall of Icarus” by W. C. Williams, and “Waiting for Icarus” by Muriel Rukeyser. Interestingly the first two of these poems were inspired by the painting “Fall of Icarus” by Peter Breughel. The author of this paper describes the details of this painting and contrasts the styles of these three poets. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Poetic Portrayals of Icarus's Fall

    A 4 page review of the poems “Musee des Beaux” by W.H. Auden, “Landscape With the Fall of Icarus” by W. C. Williams, and “Waiting for Icarus” by Muriel Rukeyser. Interestingly the first two of these poems were inspired by the painting “Fall of Icarus” by Peter Breughel. The author of this paper describes the details of this painting and contrasts the styles of these three poets. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • William Gibson's Johnny Mnemonic

    A 5 page research paper that examines cyberfiction via the example provided by William Gibson's "Johnny Mnemonic." The writer argues that an examination of this narrative demonstrates that cyberfiction writers, such as Gibson, are very aware of social issues and the implications of the rapidly increasing complexity of technology. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • William Gibson's Johnny Mnemonic

    A 5 page research paper that examines cyberfiction via the example provided by William Gibson's "Johnny Mnemonic." The writer argues that an examination of this narrative demonstrates that cyberfiction writers, such as Gibson, are very aware of social issues and the implications of the rapidly increasing complexity of technology. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Modernist Approaches in 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot

    This is a 5 page paper discussing effective aspects of modernism used by T.S. Eliot in his poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”. T.S. Eliot (1888-1965) uses modernist writing methods to go beyond reality and realism within his poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”. One of his methods used is that of “objective correlative” in which strings of elements are connected throughout the poem in order to transmit the mixed emotions of the narrator; in this case ones of hope and hopelessness for the ongoing passing of time. Time within the poem is not measured in the traditional realistic elements of hours, days or weeks but instead by the thinness of his hair, the thinness of his arms and his life measured out by “coffee spoons”. While the narrator slips us through different dimensions of time, he also does so in regards to space when he refers to the realistic daily aspects of his life and then contemplates the universe and the endless questions which accompany it. Overall, while Eliot’s poem clearly takes place in a modern lonely city, the time and space components contemplated by the narrator take the reader beyond reality and leaves readers emotionally unsettled; emotions shared by the narrator. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Secret History by Donna Tartt and Greek Themes

    This 6 page paper analyzes twelve different texts in reference to the use of Greek themes in Donna Tartt's book, The Secret History. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Importance of the Mother to D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner'

    A 4 page paper which examines the significance of the mother in D.H. Lawrence’s “The Rocking Horse Winner.” No additional sources cited.

  • Christine in Michael Dorris' A Yellow Raft in Blue Water

    A 2 1/2 page paper which examines the character of Christine in Dorris’ novel “A Yellow Raft in Blue Water” as she relates to the theme of acceptance. No additional sources cited.

  • William Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily' and Other Examples of Eccentricity

    A 5 page paper which examines William Faulkner’s character Emily, from “A Rose for Emily,” in terms of her eccentricity. Emily is discussed in relationship with other fictional characters who share some of her traits. The characters discussed are Carrie, from the film “Carrie,” Norman Bates from the film “Psycho,” Eleanor from the film “The Haunting,” and Annie from the film “Misery.” Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Mockingbird Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

    This 6 page paper discusses the use of humor and its function in To Kill a Mocking bird, as well as explains the meaning of the symbolism of the mockingbird. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • 'Good Country People' by Flannery O'Connor and Theology

    A 4 page paper which examines Flannery O’Connor’s story “Good Country People” and discusses the theology within as it applies to the character of Joy/Hulga. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature about the Blues and Jazz

    This 8 page paper looks at blues and jazz literature. The paper starts by examining what is meant by blues literature and then uses examples from the poetry of Sterling Plumpp, short stories by John Clellon Holmes, Langston Hughes and Josef Skvorecky before looking at Alice Walkers book and film The Color Purple. The thesis of the paper is that blues may originate and be a part of black culture, it reflects the experiences of the oppressed, whatever race they may be. The bibliography cites 4 sources

  • Literature about the Blues and Jazz

    This 8 page paper looks at blues and jazz literature. The paper starts by examining what is meant by blues literature and then uses examples from the poetry of Sterling Plumpp, short stories by John Clellon Holmes, Langston Hughes and Josef Skvorecky before looking at Alice Walkers book and film The Color Purple. The thesis of the paper is that blues may originate and be a part of black culture, it reflects the experiences of the oppressed, whatever race they may be. The bibliography cites 4 sources

  • Theology and the Works of Flannery O'Connor

    A 2 1/2 page paper which examines some of the work of Flannery O’Connor as it involves theology. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller and its Tragic Hero Willy Loman

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the concept of Willy Loman as a tragic hero. Arthur Miller’s character Willy Loman in his play “The Death of a Salesman” comes across as a tragic hero. As the tragic hero, Loman is both the bane yet the central axis of his family with whom he is unable to connect and form significant relationships. Loman’s own delusions lead to much of the tragic perception of him as it appears only Willy is unable to see how unrealistic his perceptions of his life and success really are. While Loman eventually commits suicide in a last attempt to provide money which will lead to his son Biff’s success, Loman again becomes the tragic hero as his death does not live up to his original delusions but instead favors his family with “freedom”; something they had all wished for while Loman was alive. Tutorial language is inserted throughout in square brackets to assist in writing. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature, Poetry, and Identity Themes

    This 3 page paper discusses the theme of racism and identity in representative works of Ellison, Morales, Johnson and Lakoff. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Death According to Mitch Albom

    A 4 page research paper on the writing of Mitch Albom, famous sports columnist for the Detroit Free Press. The writer discusses the metaphysical side of Albom, which is evident in his best seller Tuesdays with Morrie, which is compared with other writing. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Analyzing Lord of the Flies by William Golding

    A 4 page analysis of William Golding’s “Lord of the Flies.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Chosen by Chaim Potok in Terms of Family Analysis

    This 9 page paper looks at family systems and family relationships in Chaim Potok's well known work. A detailed analysis of each family in the work--the Saunders and the Malters--are outlined and evaluated. No additional sources cited.

  • Avi's Don't You Know There is a War On?

    A 3 page review of the book by Avi recounting the experiences and impressions of a fifth grade protagonist (Howie Crispers) during a critical week in March 1943. World War II is raging in Europe and America has pitched herself full fervor into the war effort. From a fifth Grader’s perspective, however, the war has many personal implications as well. Not only must he juggle his failing math grades, a principal whom he believes to be a Nazi spy, and the emotional turmoil surrounding the death of his best friend’s father and the eventual loss of that friend when he moves away, Howie Crispers must learn to deal with his obsession with one of his teachers. The author of this paper unveils this fictional story upon the historical basis of how World War II affected our country on the home front. No additional sources are listed.

  • Selfishness in O'Connor and Browning

    This 4 page report discusses O'Connor's short story and Browning's "dramatic monologue." In comparing the primary characters of each, the writer makes the assertion that the character of the grandmother is more selfish than Browning's duke. Bibliography lists only the primary sources.

  • Life and Works of Sylvia Plath

    An introduction to Plath's life and works, including a commentary on three of her poems, Daddy, Lady Lazarus and Morning Song.

  • Life and Works of Sylvia Plath

    An introduction to Plath's life and works, including a commentary on three of her poems, Daddy, Lady Lazarus and Morning Song.

  • Fried Green Tomatoes and Relationship Psychology

    A 6 page paper which examines how the characters relate to each other in terms of connections, relational functioning, mutuality, interpersonal dynamics, and motivation. No additional sources are used.

  • Sexuality and Young Women in Sleeping Beauty by Rosario Ferre and Wild Swans by Alice Munro

    A 3 page paper which discusses how young women and their sexuality are seen by society and by the girls in Alice Munro’s “Wild Swans” and Rosario Ferre’s “Sleeping Beauty.” Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • What My Heart Wants to Tell by Verna Mae Slone

    This 3 page report discusses Slone's book about the mountain people of Knott County, Kentucky, where her family has lived since 1790. Her intent was to dispel the myths and half-truths that exist about the people and the area. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Literary Analysis of William Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily'

    This 4 page paper discusses the various aspects of Faulkner's short story, A Rose for Emily. Symbolism, character psychology, setting, and quotes included. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Meaning of 'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the meaning behind Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy." The writer points out that throughout the poem, images of men jumble together, some of her father, some of her ex-husband, some that present attempts by Plath to understand her father through his Germanic background. Collectively, along with the intentionally schoolgirl-like rhymes, the poem conveys the black desperation of a lost little girl, which definitely was Plath's psychic state at that time. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Meaning of 'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the meaning behind Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy." The writer points out that throughout the poem, images of men jumble together, some of her father, some of her ex-husband, some that present attempts by Plath to understand her father through his Germanic background. Collectively, along with the intentionally schoolgirl-like rhymes, the poem conveys the black desperation of a lost little girl, which definitely was Plath's psychic state at that time. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Meaning of 'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the meaning behind Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy." The writer points out that throughout the poem, images of men jumble together, some of her father, some of her ex-husband, some that present attempts by Plath to understand her father through his Germanic background. Collectively, along with the intentionally schoolgirl-like rhymes, the poem conveys the black desperation of a lost little girl, which definitely was Plath's psychic state at that time. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature By and About Women

    A 6 page paper which examines what a reader could gain from reading three different pieces of literature written by, and about, women. The books are “Beloved” by Toni Morrison, “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen, and “Ghost Country” by Sara Paretsky. No additional sources cited.

  • Anne Rice's Writings and Sexuality

    A 10 page paper which examines Anne Rice’s use of sexuality in her vampire novels. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Mature Playwrights Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares plays by Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller. The writer argues that while Miller's plays had a broader thematic scope (e.g. The Crucible is applicable to the McCarthy era), Williams' The Glass Menagerie is still a "mature" drama, as it offers insight into human relationships. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Manchurian Candidate Conspiracy

    This paper explores Richard Condon's book and Frankenheimer's movie 'The Manchurian Candidate' in terms of conspiracy theory and McCarthyism of the era (1959-1960). There is a brief comparison of the two and a short biography of Condon. The book focuses on the psychological and political aspects of the story. Bibliography lists 4 sources. JVcondon.rtf

  • What Defines Americanness in American Literature

    A 4 page essay that discusses works by Chopin, Emerson, Twain, James and Irving in regards to what qualities or characteristics make American literature "American." The writer argues that in the early days of the United States as a free and independent nation, its culture was still largely derivitive of European cultures, particularly that of England. However, throughout the nineteenth century, U.S. writers successfully established a body of literature that was distinctly American, owing little to outside sources and signifying that the US possesses a literary tradition that reflects the experience of a unique people, their history and orientation toward life. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature and the Creature in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    A 3 page paper which examines the significance of the novels that the Creature reads in Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein.” No additional sources cited.

  • A Comparison of the Book and Film Versions of Alcott's Little Women

    This 28 page paper compares Alcott's LIttle women to the film version (1994) of Little Women by Gillian Armstrong. Quotes, citations, examples from various scholarly sources. Contextual support offered from both film and book versions. Bibliography lists 16 sources.

  • A Character and Thematic Comparison of Desiree's Baby and Antlers

    A comparison between the themes and characters in Chopin's Desiree's Baby and Bass's Antlers, with particular reference to the exploration of gender roles and sexual morality in the two societies depicted. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • Bram Stoker's Dracula and Kate Chpin's The Awakening Compared

    A 10 page research paper/essay that examines Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening (1899) and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). The writer argues that these works provide readers with vastly different conceptualizations of fantasy, sexuality and race. Chopin addresses the negative consequences of a woman's sexual awakening and her eventual suicide to escape the restrictions of Victorian society on female life. Stoker creates a fantasy in which an Eastern European monster preys on innocent English women and children. Examination of these two works shows that while these two authors each address common themes, they do so from diametrically opposed positions. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Symbolism and the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne

    This 4-page paper discusses the symbolism in three Nathaniel Hawthorn stories: "The Birthmark," "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" and "Youg Goodman Brown."

  • Annotated Bibliography for Ernest Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls

    A 3 page annotated bibliography of sorts on Ernest Hemingway’s “For Whom the Bell Tolls.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 1984 by George Orwell and Language's Power

    This 4 page paper discusses Orwell's themes and discussion in regard to langauge. Freedom of speech is discussed in relation to the novel. Quotes cited from novel to support argument. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Presley in The Octopus by Frank Norris

    This 6 page paper discusses the role of Presley in Frank Norris' book, The Octopus. Point of view, themes, brief synopsis, offered. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 0 sources.

  • The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

    A 5 page essay that examines the principal theme of Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, as it is suggested by the title. At the beginning of his novel The Sun Also Rises (1926), Ernest Hemingway includes an epigraph that consists of two quotations. The first is from Gertrude Stein, an avant-garde American poet who was the emotional center of the group of expatriate American writers living in Paris during the 1920s. This quote describes the generation that came of age during World War I as a "lost generation." The horror of the war had caused this group of young people to lose faith in traditional values, leaving them adrift, without a center, in the fluctuating current of modernism. But also included in the epigraph is a quote from the Bible, from Ecclesiastes, which states that the world endures and the sun continues to rise, which suggests that time and nature will eventually provide a new generation and new hope. Examination of this novel shows that both themes, hopelessness and the hope of rejuvenation, are integral to the structure of the text as a whole. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Fontana, California and Davis's City of Quartz

    This 3-page book examines Davis' City of Quartz, and discusses the history of and comparison with the various parts of the city of Fontana.

  • American Contributions of Edgar Allan Poe

    Edgar Allen Poe made contributions to America that went far beyond the contribution of his literature contributions. He supported both literature and art, and educating American minds. In doing so, he helped establish a number of magazines and newspapers as well as the American literary and art scene. These contributions greatly assisted the American public and establish American art and literature, as well as assisting Poe hone his own art. 5 works cited. jvPoepro.rtf

  • Sandra Brown's Mirror Image

    A 5 page review of the book “Mirror Image” by Sandra Brown. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Nineteen' by Elizabeth Alexander

    A 4 page explication of Alexander's poem "Nineteen, which captures the essence of her style, which is free flowing and lyrical. Explication of this poem shows that Alexander, like other experts of the free verse style such as Whitman, has the ability to capture the essence and spirit of a time, place and age through the voice of her youthful narrator/protagonist, which expresses the poet's impressions and memories in free verse. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'I HAD been hungry all these years' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page explication of Emily Dickinson's poignant poem "I HAD been hungry all the years." In this poem, Dickinson offers images of what life's banquet is liked when viewed by someone who feels like an outsider. Dickinson was a recluse most of her life and seldom ventured from her home. Examination of this poem suggests that, at some point in her life, she had the opportunity to experience more than her solitary existence and that the "plenty" of this occurrence was both painful and revealing to her. No additional sources cited.

  • Discussion and Summary of The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

    A 3 page paper which summarizes and discusses Alice Sebold’s novel “The Lovely Bones.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Depictions of Nature in the Poetry of Dickinson and Frost

    A 3 page essay that contrasts and compares 2 poems. Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost are both evocative poets whose verse shows each poet's gift for reflecting natural scenes with photographic accuracy, conveying to the reader not only how the scene looked, but also what it made the poet feel and the thoughts it conjured. Two representative poems, "The Wind begun to knead the Grass" by Dickinson and "Design" by Frost, demonstrate the marked similarities between the ways in which these two great American poets utilized diction and poetic imagery in their work and also how they differed. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Assassination of John F. Kennedy Portrayed in Libra by Don DeLillo

    7 pages in length. DeLillo, who represents the real in a way "many postmodernists argue is impossible" (Hutchinson 117), brings to the table an entirely unique interpretation of postmodernism; while his approach to the events surrounding the Kennedy assassination can be readily correlated with conventional postmodern thought, it nonetheless extends beyond such conventionality to the point where staunch postmodernists must stretch their own understanding of the concept to reach DeLillo's central theme. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Symbols Used in Poetry and in the Bible

    A 6 page essay that explores the meaning of symbol in 4 works: Matthew 13:24-30; "The Boston Evening Transcript" by T.S. Eliot; "The Lightning is a Yellow Fork" by Emily Dickinson and "The Road Less Traveled" by Robert Frost. The writer offers some biographical facts on each author; then discusses the meaning of the poem and then how it uses symbols to convey that meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Genres Modernism and Postmodernism

    A 6 page paper which examines the journey of the hero in modern and postmodern works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Edgar Allan Poe's Poetry and Death

    A 6 page paper which examines how the deaths of people close to him influenced Poe’s poems. Specifically considered are “Alone,” Annabel Lee,” “The Raven,” “To My Mother,” and “Ulalume.” Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'Smile' in the Poetry of Robert Browning and Dorothy Parker

    A 3 page essay on the use of the world "smile" in 2 poems. Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess" and Dorothy Parker in "A Certain Lady" create poems that employ the word "smile." "Smile" in each poem refers to the standard meaning of the word, that is, a facial expression in which the corners of the mouth turn upward, indicating pleasure or amusement; however, this word is employed quite differently within the context of each poem. Browning's Duke Ferrara condemns his "last duchess" because she smiled too freely and too genuinely and did not keep her smiles as something belonging solely to him. Dorothy Parker's "certain lady" convinces her lover that her special smiles are only for him, but admits that they hide a duplicitous heart. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Smile' in the Poetry of Robert Browning and Dorothy Parker

    A 3 page essay on the use of the world "smile" in 2 poems. Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess" and Dorothy Parker in "A Certain Lady" create poems that employ the word "smile." "Smile" in each poem refers to the standard meaning of the word, that is, a facial expression in which the corners of the mouth turn upward, indicating pleasure or amusement; however, this word is employed quite differently within the context of each poem. Browning's Duke Ferrara condemns his "last duchess" because she smiled too freely and too genuinely and did not keep her smiles as something belonging solely to him. Dorothy Parker's "certain lady" convinces her lover that her special smiles are only for him, but admits that they hide a duplicitous heart. No additional sources cited.

  • Technique, Theme, and Conflict in Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell

    7 pages in length. The writer discusses conflict, theme and technique as they relate to Orwell's 1984. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Los Angeles Literature

    This 12 page paper discusses eight books about Southern California, explicates passages from each of them, and explains how the eight relate to one another. It also "grades" and evaluates each novel with regard to how it adds to the literature about Los Angeles and what value (if any) the book has to understanding the culture of Southern California. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • How Baumer and Kantorek in All Quiet On The Western FrontWould Respond to the poem The Next War by Robert Graves

    4 pages in length. The writer briefly discusses how Baumer and Kantorek would respond to Robert Graves' poem "The Next War." Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway on the American Dream

    A 3 page paper which examines the idea of the American Dream as seen in Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" and Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby." No additional sources cited.

  • An Analysis of The Lovely Bones

    A 3 page analysis of the narrator, the character of Susie, in Alice Sebold's novel "The Lovely Bones." No additional sources cited.

  • Jewish Literature and the Jewish Family's Decline

    A five page discussion of the insights into Jewish families that can be found in Michael Gold's "Jews Without Money" and Tony Kushner's "Angels in America". Both authors are Jewish but both present Jews in a slightly different light than might be expected. Both depict a move away from traditional Jewish morals and mores. No additional sources are listed.

  • William Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily' and Society's Views on Sexuality

    A 3 page essay that discusses the societal context of William Faulkner's short story, "A Rose for Emily." In this story, Faulkner paints a complex psychological portrait not only of a Southern woman who is caught between conflicting social mores and her own desires, but he also shows the sociological complexity of the small Southern town in which she lived. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'War is Kind' and 'A Mystery of Heroism' by Stephen Crane

    A 4 page paper which examines Stephen Crane’s short story “A Mystery of Heroism” and his poem “War is Kind,” and discusses Crane’s apparent attitude towards war. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature, Naturalism, and the Works of Frank Norris and Rebecca Harding Davis

    This 7-page paper focuses on comparisons when it comes to Rebecca Harding Davis' "Life in the Iron Mills" and Frank Norris' "The Octopus," and how both authors use naturalism to get their points across.

  • Water Imagery in She's Come Undone

    This 5 page paper examines the book and the water imagery found in it. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Questions on Death of a Salesman Answered

    A 3 page paper that gives brief answers to 7 questions on Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. Topics covered include Willy's philosophy, Biff's motivation and Willy's death as compared to Dave Singleman's. No additional sources cited.

  • Three Popular American Novels

    This 12 page paper discusses three popular novels: The Street Lawyer by John Grisham; Daddy's Little Girl by Mary Higgins Clark; and The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd and the Power Concept

    A 5 page paper which examines the nature of power, considers the power structures that exist within the novel, how power is exercised, and how power can be abused, exploited, or corrupted, and the impact this has upon individuals and society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • John Keats and Ernest Hemingway

    A 3 page paper which compares and contrasts the love seen in John Keats’ poem “La Belle Dame sans Merci” and Ernest Hemingway’s short story “A Very Short Story.” No additional sources cited.

  • Science According to the Poems of Walt Whitman and Edgar Allan Poe

    A 4 page essay that compares and contrasts 2 poems by Poe and Whitman. Poe's "Sonnet--To Science" and Whitman's "When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer," address not only the same subject matter, but also they take an identical stand on the topic. While Poe's poem is the most overt in its message, Whitman also takes the stand that science, specifically astronomy, attempts to drain the beauty and mystery from life and turns the wondrous into the mundane. No additional sources cited.

  • Science According to the Poems of Walt Whitman and Edgar Allan Poe

    A 4 page essay that compares and contrasts 2 poems by Poe and Whitman. Poe's "Sonnet--To Science" and Whitman's "When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer," address not only the same subject matter, but also they take an identical stand on the topic. While Poe's poem is the most overt in its message, Whitman also takes the stand that science, specifically astronomy, attempts to drain the beauty and mystery from life and turns the wondrous into the mundane. No additional sources cited.

  • 'My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that discusses Emily Dickinson's poem number 754, "My Life has stood--a Loaded Gun," in which Dickinson represents herself and her life, metaphorically, as a loaded weapon, a phallic symbol that is associated with masculinity. The imagery, and the energy, that pervades the poem indicates Dickinson's deeply seated conflicted feelings concerning traditional concepts of masculinity and femininity and the symbolism she employs expresses her inner rage at the restricted nature of gender that was prevalent in Victorian society. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that discusses Emily Dickinson's poem number 754, "My Life has stood--a Loaded Gun," in which Dickinson represents herself and her life, metaphorically, as a loaded weapon, a phallic symbol that is associated with masculinity. The imagery, and the energy, that pervades the poem indicates Dickinson's deeply seated conflicted feelings concerning traditional concepts of masculinity and femininity and the symbolism she employs expresses her inner rage at the restricted nature of gender that was prevalent in Victorian society. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Warren Adler's The War of the Roses

    A 4 page review/summary of “The War of the Roses” by Warren Adler. No additional sources cited.

  • Writing Styles of Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson

    A 3 page research paper that discusses the writing styles of Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine and whether Paine's work can be considered as literature. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Guilt and Grief in The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

    A 4 page essay that discusses Alice Sebold's novel The Lovely Bones, which begins with the protagonist, a fourteen-year-old girl named Susie, stating that she was murdered on December 6, 1973 (Sebold 5). Each of the principle characters in the narrative react to Susie's death in their own particular way. With the omniscience of death, Susie describes this with crystal clarity from her perspective in heaven. Using this narrative device, Sebold is able to delineate the various ways that people react to grief, loss and the guilt that comes from remaining alive when someone dear to us has died. The writer discusses how each character reacts to Susie's death.

  • Poems of Emily Dickinson

    This is a 9 page paper that discusses three of Emily Dickinson's poems and her use of metaphors and irregular structure. The bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Dignity as a Universal Sociocultural Theme

    A 5 page affirmation that although we typically view our modern world from the perspective of our own sociocultural background we can experience the universality of human dignity first person simply by turning to the literature. This paper examines dignity as it is illustrated by Ernest J. Gains' book "A Lesson Before Dying", Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from a Birmingham Jail", and several other noteworthy writings. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Douglas Bond's Mr. Pipes Comes to America

    This 3 page paper discusses the book Mr. Pipes Comes to America by Douglas Bond. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Lance Armstrong and the notion 'Its Not About the Bike'

    A 5 page discussion about Lance Armstrong's account of his fight against cancer. This paper provides several quotes from Armstrong's book as well as a detailed review of the physiological changes that come about with cancer. Bibliography lists sources.

  • Storytelling and the Film Adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates' 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'

    A 4 page essay. The writing of Joyce Carol Oates frequently addresses the predicament of being female within a patriarchal culture (Wesley 75). In her short story, "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" Oates again addresses this subject in a way that focuses on the cruel initiation into the sexual realities of male domination for the story's fifteen-year-old heroine, Connie. The film Smooth Talk (directed by Joyce Chopra, 1985) dramatizes this work. In many ways, the film remains faithful to the critically acclaimed short story, however, the director chose to alter the ending and some critics found this inappropriate. However, examination of this feature of the film shows that it fits with Oates' intentions in her storytelling and is, therefore, an appropriate ending to a superb film adaptation. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • The Environmental Writer Alice Walker

    15 pages in length. When one thinks of an environmental writer, the first thing that comes to mind is one whose prose sing the praises of trees, animals, the ocean along with the rest of the natural world. While that is the case in many instances of environmental writing, there is also another facet of this particular literary approach that addresses the environmental capacity of social issues, not the least of which includes racial and gender injustice. Alice Walker, considered to be one of the most identifiable of all environmental writers, gleans her environmental prose from a combination of personal experience and historical circumstances that have served to compromise the very nature of equitable existence between and among the races. Moreover, the way in which she employs a certain type of character to compensate for this gross lack of environmental equity speaks to the author's intrinsic desire to revise the entire premise of racial relations much the same way a writer submits revisions to a literary work-in-progress. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • 'The Poisonwood Bible' by Barbara Kingsolver and a Responsibility Letter

    A 6 page creative essay in letter form which examines what responsibility (if any) do individuals have to reach out to cultures and other individuals that are foreign to them and what responsibility does the United States and its citizens have to the world community, citing passages from “The Poisonwood Bible” to support the argued thesis. No additional sources are used.

  • 'The Poisonwood Bible' by Barbara Kingsolver and a Responsibility Letter

    A 6 page creative essay in letter form which examines what responsibility (if any) do individuals have to reach out to cultures and other individuals that are foreign to them and what responsibility does the United States and its citizens have to the world community, citing passages from “The Poisonwood Bible” to support the argued thesis. No additional sources are used.

  • Freedom Losing Out to Democracy in 2014 America

    This 3 page paper considers the novel America 2014 written in the style of George Orwell’s 1984 written shortly after the Second World War, is a criticism of the way in which power may take away freedom and liberty as a result of the manipulation of free in the post 9/11 society where the war on terrorism reaches an extreme level. The bibliography cites 3 sources.

  • 2 Versions of 'To Build a Fire' by Jack London

    A 12 page essay that discusses both versions of London's most famous short story. The earliest version, published in 1902, appeared in Youth's Companion and was written for a juvenile audience. London produced a second version of the story in 1908 and it was published in The Century Magazine. The second version of the story is famous as London's best work and is clearly for an adult audience. While the stories are different in both style and content, due to their intended audiences, both delve heavily into the psychological makeup of their protagonists and, in each, London describes the protagonist's perception in relating each man's fate. In so doing, London offers clear and perceptive insight into the psychology of risk-taking behavior for a young and older man, showing both the similarities and the differences in their perception of a dire situation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Simple Eloquence of 'I Wandered Lonely As a Cloud' by William Wordsworth

    A 3 page explication of Wordsworth's poem "I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud," which is a simple, but eloquent, depiction of nature that emphasizes how a moment of natural beauty can bring solace and pleasure when remembered. Wordsworth describes a rather ordinary occurrence, which is seeing a field of daffodils blowing in the wind. Yet, his artistry serves to use the very commonality of this experience to help the reader see a connection between humanity and the natural world. No additional sources cited.

  • Story Significance of Joyce Carol Oates's 'Black Water'

    A 3 page paper which examines the significance of the story “Black Water” by Joyce Carol Oates. No additional sources cited.

  • Change Reflected in Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines how social, historical, political, and religious events from 1900 to 1940 are reflected in literature during the time. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Paula G. Allen's Spider Woman's Granddaughters and Gordon Henry Jr.'s Light People

    A 7 page book review that addresses Gordon Henry Jr.'s Light People and Paula G. Allen's short story collection Spider Woman's Granddaughters. These works represent literature written in the traditions of Native America. While distinctly different, examination of these two texts reveals that they share commonality that speaks eloquently of the richness and diversity of Native American culture. No additional sources cited.

  • Italian American Authors and Three of Their Works

    A 9 page paper that is composed of 3 entirely separate shorter paper on specific Italian-American authors. These papers are 3 pages in length and have at least 2 sources in their bibliographies. The authors and works are: Giose Rimanelli's Benedetta in Guysterland; Richard Vetere's Gangster Apparel; and Anthony Valerio's Lefty and the Button Men (originally published as Conversation with Johnny). In all, the bibliographies list 7 sources.

  • Ishmael Reed's Flight to Canada and History

    A 9 page examination of history in Ishmael Reed’s “Flight to Canada.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Culture in Alberto Rios's Nani and Marilyn Chin's Turtle Soup

    This is a 4 page paper which examines how cultural heritage is depicted in the poems Turtle Soup by Marilyn Chin and Nani by Alberto Rios. The bibliography has 2 sources.

  • Fitzgerald's Literary Influences, and His Influence on Literature

    This 6 page paper examines the life and times of this prolific writer. How he influenced literature and how other authors such as Hemingway influenced him are issues discussed. Much information about his personal life is relayed . Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • The Life and Works of Emma Lazarus

    A 5 page essay on the poetry of Emma Lazarus (1849-1887) who is the most prominent Jewish American poet of the nineteenth century. Through her eloquent poetry and other literary work, she endeavored to express what it meant to be outside the mainstream of American society, to give a voice to the thousands of immigrants who were trying to integrate themselves into American society during the nineteenth century. The writer discusses 3 of Lazarus' poems. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald and Literature Influences

    A 3 page paper which examines the influence F. Scott Fitzgerald had in the world of literature and how literature influenced him. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Virgin Suicides Aspects

    A 5 page essay that consists of 5 one-page short essays that each address some aspect of the novel. Topics covered include social and psychological aspects a narrative that describes the suicides of five sisters. What the boys think of the Lisbon sisters; why Trip leaves Lux on the football field; Dr. Hornicker's opinion; the symbolism of the debutante party are discussed. No additional sources cited.

  • Excerpt from The Silent Partners by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

    This 5 page paper analyzes "Working Conditions," an excerpt from Elizabeth Stuart Phelps's book "The Silent Partner."

  • 'Out Far Nor in Deep' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page research paper that analyzes this Frost poem. The writer first discusses the form of the poem and then takes the poem stanza by stanza to discuss the meaning of its images and metaphors, drawing on scholarly and personal interpretation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • 'Out Far Nor in Deep' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page research paper that analyzes this Frost poem. The writer first discusses the form of the poem and then takes the poem stanza by stanza to discuss the meaning of its images and metaphors, drawing on scholarly and personal interpretation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Suicide in 'The Awakening' by Kate Chopin

    An 8 page paper which examines why Edna, in Kate Chopin’s “The Awakening,” committed suicide. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Feminism and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 6 page essay that analyzes Kate Chopin's masterpiece The Awakening. The writer proposes that the ultimate question in interpreting this novel to discern why Edna commits suicide. Scholarship has explored this question, and this body of literature suggests that Chopin's evaluation of patriarchy and its effects goes beyond a surface reading that defines Victorian marriage as restrictive and Edna's "awakening" as purely sexual. Close examination of this novel suggests that Chopin intended the reader to see Edna as being psychically scarred by her strict Presbyterian background and cold, patriarchal father. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Life and Works of William Faulkner

    This 7 page paper examines Faulkner's works to see if they are autobiographical; in addition, it considers his major themes, his contribution to literature and his style. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'Poem (As the Cat)' by William Carlos Williams

    A 5 page essay that discusses the imagery in this poem. The poetry of William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) uses imagery that typically refers to everyday experiences and concrete images that describe material objects. Goodblatt and Glicksohn propose that comprehending a metaphor is akin to problem solving, "in its more creative form," and that this involves "an act of perceptual and semantic restructuring. Considering this perspective, this analysis focuses on the imagery that Williams employs in his verse entitled "Poem (As the cat," which offers a typical example of Williams utilization of metaphor and imagery within a short lyric form. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried and the Vietnam Draft

    A paper which considers the moral and ethical issues surrounding conscription, with specific reference to the Vietnam draft, and the way that these issues are addressed in O'Brien's novel, The Things They Carried. Bibliography lists 7 sources

  • Poe/Annabel Lee

    A 3 page explication of Edgar Allan Poe's last poem, Annabel Lee, which was written in 1849. The writer argues that this poem is a haunting tribute by the still grieving Poe for his young wife Virginia who had passed away two years previously from tuberculosis. Examination of this poem's theme, mood and point-of-view demonstrates the depth of emotion that Poe had for his deceased child/bride, as well as how he viewed his own death with equanimity because he saw it as uniting him with his beloved. No additional sources cited.

 

Most Relevant Research Papers

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

 

Copyright © 2000-2021 The Paper Store Enterprises, Inc. & Fast Papers On-line.
All rights reserved. Search for your essay here.

U.S. based premium essay, research and
term papers service since 2000.