Research Papers on All Literature

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

  • Poetic Analysis of William Butler Yeats' 'Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites'

    A 5 page analysis of the wording and underlying meaning of this Irish pub song. The author asserts that Yeats’ poem encapsulates the idealism and the bitterness of the Irish Civil War and that it also encapsulates the societal stature in which the Irish robed their heroes, a stature which was sufficient enough to resolve them of wrongdoing as well. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of John Keats' 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page review of this classic work of iterature. The author of this paper reviews some of the deeper connotations which the poem suggests. As in many of his poems, Keats’ emphasizes the specific beauty of an object or person in relation with the beauty of the setting in which that object or person existed. The most profound, and indeed heavily debated pronouncement of the poem, however, is the observation that beauty is truth. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Emily Dickinson and the Poems of Fascicle Twenty-Eight

    A 14 page research paper that examines the poems in fascicle 28, a division that refers to packets of poems that Dickinson grouped together herself. The writer offers a brief explication of each poem, emphasizing thematic content and how the individual poems fit with the overall pattern. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Eyes That Last I Saw in Tears' by T.S. Eliot

    A 6 page research paper/analysis of Eliot's poem "Eyes that Last I Saw in Tears." The writer argues that this poem conveys a haunting sense of regret, sorrow and, also, lingering guilt. The poem does not inform the reader as to why the memory of a look, the image of crying eyes, haunts the poet, yet an examination of this work clearly shows that this is what is taking place. Considering this fact, it seems logical to look at possible circumstances in Eliot's life that could have provided the impetus for this poem. By looking at both the poem and at certain known facts about Eliot's life, it is possible to find further illumination on the meaning of the poem from understanding the basis for Eliot's failed marriage. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Robert Lowell/Skunk Hour

    A 7 page explication of Robert Lowell's poem "Skunk Hour," which was written in 1959 and describes Lowell's impressions of a Maine sea town (Lowell 131). At the beginning of the poem, that is, the first four stanzas, Lowell describes a sterile, decaying setting, which he tries to lighten with a "tone of tolerance, humor and randomness at the sad prospect" (Lowell 131). However, even in this section of the poem, Lowell's perspective drifts as it "sinks out of sight into the causal, chancy arrangements of nature and decay" (Lowell 131). Then, in the later half of the poem, i.e., the last four stanzas, Lowell's tone dramatically changes as he describes the "dark night" of his soul, which is not "gracious, but secular, puritan and agnostical. An Existentialist night" (Lowell 132). A close reading of this poem demonstrates the accuracy of Lowell's personal assessment of his poem's meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Out Far Nor in Deep' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page research paper that analyzes this Frost poem. The writer first discusses the form of the poem and then takes the poem stanza by stanza to discuss the meaning of its images and metaphors, drawing on scholarly and personal interpretation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • 'Because I could not stop for Death' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Emily Dickinson's poem. The writer argues that in this poem, Dickinson presents a rather cordial view of death, which she personifies as a courtly gentleman. Her verse proposes that death entails an adjustment in perspective from the human state of awareness toward one that is universal. In other words, the poem describes a period of adjustment in which the speaker adjusts to a new state of awareness and being. No additional sources cited.

  • Linguistic Analysis of Thomas Hardy's Poem 'Darkling Thrush'

    A 10 page linguistically oriented analysis of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush." The writer offers an examination of this poem that explores syntax, phonology, morphology, and lexicon/cohesion. Analysis addresses the poem line-by-line, sometimes word-by-word. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Over There, World War II,' and 'I Sing, Too, America' by Langston Hughes

    An 8 page research paper/essay that analyzes two of Hughes poems, "I, too, Sing America" and "Over there, World War II." First, the writer gives a brief biography of the poet, then discusses critical opinion of his work, and then, critically analyzes these two poems. The writer demonstrates how the political content of these poems was aimed at both a black and white audience. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Estates Satire and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

    This 6 page paper discusses Estates Satire and how Chaucer uses it in his poem.

  • Lyrical Left Wing Greenwich Village Community

    This is a 9 page paper discussing the sexual politics within the lyric left from the Greenwich Village community. The New York Greenwich Village community in the late 19th and throughout the 20th century became the center for writers, journalists and artists all promoting ideas and lifestyle representing the political and sexual left including feminism, bohemianism, bisexuality, homosexuality and overall freedom of thought and action. Much of the writing which came from Greenwich was considered within the realm of the “lyric left” through the works of Jack Kerouac, Djuna Barnes, Sinclair Lewis, Willa Cather and especially Edna St. Vincent Millay among many others. Millay wrote a great many poems which not only revealed the bohemian and “radical sexual” conduct within the lifestyles of her and her colleagues but also commented on the fullest extent of feminism in which women can feel sexual desire and needs in addition to having control over their own lives and sexual fulfillment. At the same time, her poems also show the conflict which still existed between men and women and her own desire to overcome any restrictions carried over from the previous Victorian expectations. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Adultery in The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    5 pages in length. Intolerance towards acts of adultery was alive and well, historically, during the period of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. The sexual repression and hypocrisy that reigned during the seventeenth century -- as compared with the more relaxed attitudes of today -- was evident within the Puritan culture. The writer addresses such sexual imprisonment as it relates to the mentality of that time. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Three Plays by Federico Garcia Lorca

    6 pages in length. The sexual instinct that represents the creativity in Federico Garcia Lorca's trilogy of three plays depicting Spain's cultural identity clearly establishes the manner by which the playwright aspires to portray the intensity of his characters' existence. Interwoven amidst this underlying sexual instinct is the relationship of Spain's socioeconomic concerns at that time and how Lorca reinforces this subject with the use of theatrical and artistic methods. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Sandra Cisneros: Women Hollering Creek

    Sexual Warfare : A 4 page paper which examines the politics of sexual warfare in three stories from Sandra Cisneros’ work Women Hollering Creek. No additional sources cited.

  • 'The Waste Land' by T.S. Eliot

    T. S. Eliot – The Waste Land: This 6-page analytical essay examines the poem The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot. This poet believes that modern society lacks a vital sense of community and a spiritual center. In addition, Eliot asserts that human beings are isolated, and sexual relations have become sterile and meaningless. Bibliography lists 1 source. SNEliot1.doc

  • Psychological Theory and 'I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings' by Maya Angelou

    3 pages in length. Cultivating such intestinal fortitude after growing up surrounded by fear, self-loathing, sexual abuse and a sense of abandonment, Maya Angelou proved how one can rally back amidst what may otherwise be a lost and troublesome existence. Examining her remarkable path from an awkward and insecure childhood to a poised and self-assured adulthood, one may well attribute much of this progression to John Dewey's Progressivism Theory. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Religion and Sex Views of Walt Whitman

    A 6 page discussion of the manner in which this noted nineteenth century poet viewed religion and the subject of sex. The author of this paper presents several quotes from Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” These quotes reveal not only the graphic sexual content of Whitman’s work but also demonstrate the poet’s apparent belief that religion was only valid in a non-judgmental sense in that it reflected one’s own inner feelings. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Insanity and Sexual Hysteria in Turn of the Screw by Henry James

    A 6 page paper that provides an overview of the elements of James' story that culminate in the depiction of the governess as a women fundamentally driven by her sexual identification and actions, that ultimately end in her insanity. Bibliography lists 6 additional sources.

  • Women's Role in Dante Alighieri's 'Inferno'

    A 2 page paper looking at the fact that women's sins as depicted by Dante tend to be overwhelmingly of a sexual nature as compared to men's. The paper concludes that this may be because women in Dante's time were considered to have a limited sphere of influence, and their role was seen as primarily procreative. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Political Reflections in 'The Inferno' and Divine Comedy of Dante

    A 5 page overview of the primary structure and plot of this fourteenth century classic poem. Discusses the literary classification of the poem and the historical and political circumstances under which it was written. The author contends that while Dante’s work is influenced to some degree by the historical setting, it is not limited to a discourse on politics. “Inferno”, in particular, is considered the greatest medieval poem and holds many political as well as religious parallels. No additional sources are listed.

  • Poe/Annabel Lee

    A 3 page explication of Edgar Allan Poe's last poem, Annabel Lee, which was written in 1849. The writer argues that this poem is a haunting tribute by the still grieving Poe for his young wife Virginia who had passed away two years previously from tuberculosis. Examination of this poem's theme, mood and point-of-view demonstrates the depth of emotion that Poe had for his deceased child/bride, as well as how he viewed his own death with equanimity because he saw it as uniting him with his beloved. No additional sources cited.

  • Mixture of Christianity and Paganism in 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (circa 1375-1400). The writer argues that this poem is an amalgamation of Christian and pagan elements, which are discussed and substantiated with quotes from the poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Meaning of 'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the meaning behind Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy." The writer points out that throughout the poem, images of men jumble together, some of her father, some of her ex-husband, some that present attempts by Plath to understand her father through his Germanic background. Collectively, along with the intentionally schoolgirl-like rhymes, the poem conveys the black desperation of a lost little girl, which definitely was Plath's psychic state at that time. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Wood Pile' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page explication of Robert Frost's poem "The Wood-Pile." The writer summarizes the poem, and then examines it closely, line by line, as to Frost's use of poetic devices, as well as the poem's thematic meaning. No additional sources cited.

  • 'The Negro Speaks of Rivers' by Langston Hughes

    A 5 page essay that explicates the many layers of meaning in this poem by Hughes. The writer argues that this poem presents a vision of African American culture and life that was totally different from the one that existed at the time of the poem's publication (the 1920s). No additional sources cited.

  • Wordsworth & Hardy/Perspectives on Nature

    A 3 page essay that observes that both William Wordsworth, in 1838, and Thomas Hardy, in 1900, wrote poems that were inspired by the beautiful song of the thrush. But while these two poems share a common topic, the Romantic approach and exuberant optimism of Wordsworth is quite different from the dark skepticism that characterized the Victorian worldview exemplified by Hardy. Nevertheless, examination of the two poems shows that each poet took inspiration and encouragement from the thrush, each in his own way. No additional sources cited.

  • Gary Soto/”Oranges”

    A 3 page explications of “Oranges,” a poem by Gary Soto, which is evocative of innocence, as it tells of the narrator’s experience on his first “date” with a girl. This memory is obviously a profound one for the narrator and the reason for the memory’s significance in this man’s life is largely conveyed through the poem’s lyrical imagery and symbolism. A close reading of the poem and examination of this feature demonstrates this point. No additional sources cited.

  • Life and Works of Sylvia Plath

    An introduction to Plath's life and works, including a commentary on three of her poems, Daddy, Lady Lazarus and Morning Song.

  • Influences of Nature and Biography in the Works of Emily Dickinson

    This is a 5 page paper discussing Emily Dickinson and two poems from her Nature class. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) wrote well over 2,000 poems during her life in Amherst, Massachusetts but only seven were published while she was still alive. After her death, her poems were classified and published. Dickinson was heavily influenced by several factors in her life: the religion of her father, the impact of the Civil War, and nature. A look at two poems from her “Nature” class shows how Dickinson combines all of these symbolic elements to depict a time of loneliness, longing and false hope. Although the poems describe a time in nature when summer is just out of reach, the meanings run much deeper for Dickinson and her readers, as for her summer is a time of life, fruitfulness and happiness which has been lost. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • DOUBLE STANDARD BY ELLEN WATKINS HARPER

    This 3-page paper discusses how Ellen Watkins Harper's poem "The Double Standard" explores the relationship between the sexes during the 19th century.

  • Interpretation of 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot

    A 5 page essay that offer interpretation of Eliot's famous poem. The writer argues that Prufrock realizes that he has aged without ever really having lived and there is the suggestion at one point in the poem that he toys with the idea of asking a woman to marry him. He does not, however, do this because of his fear of rejection. As this suggests, Eliot's poem captures perfectly the psychic state of a shy, insecure person who feels trapped in a "hell" created by his social paralysis, which keeps him from ever doing anything, from ever really living, out of fear of looking foolish, as well as the fear of embarrassment that results from having tried and failed. As this suggests, examination of this poem shows how it is a psychological profile of a modern individual whose life is meaningless due to his internalization of what he feels is expected of him. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Human Isolation in The Country Doctor and Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

    A paper which looks at man's isolation from society and Kafka's use of surrealism, with particular reference to Metamorphosis and The Country Doctor.

  • Part One of Faust by Goethe

    A 3 page essay that examines Goethe's Faust, Part I and argues that while it is Faust who is the presumed genius, the man of letters and learning and Margaret, his love, is but a simple peasant girl, it is Margaret who has learned from her experiences at the end of Goethe's Faust, Part I, not the learned doctor. This is evidenced by Faust's continued association with the devil, Mephistopheles, while Margaret rejects them both, repents, and is, therefore, taken to heaven. No additional sources cited.

  • Portrayals of Good Science Gone Bad in Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, H.G. Wells, and Mary Shelley

    A 10 page overview of the factors which existed in the Victorian era to spawn such works as “The Island of Doctor Moreau” and “The Invisible Man”, “Frankenstein” and “Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde”. This paper describes the quest for understanding and scientific experimentation which captivated this era and speculates as to how this captivation extended to the literary world as well. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • The Creature as Frankenstein’s Victim

    This 5 page paper considers the classic novel Frankenstein and argues that the real victim of the doctor’s obsession is the Creature itself. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Death in Venice and Him with His Foot in His Mouth

    This 12 page paper discusses the characters of Gustav von Aschenbach in Death in Venice and Doctor Shawmut in Him with His Foot in His Mouth. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • "Dr. Glass-Case" by De Cervantes

    A 3 page essay on Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra's "Doctor Glass-Case." The writer argues that this sixteenth century protagonist can be viewed as the quintessential Renaissance man. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Story of Doctor Zhivago

    A 4 page paper which examines the story of “Doctor Zhivago” and illustrates how everyone, in some way, can relate to him and his struggles. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Stories by Adam Haslett

    A 6 page paper which examines and analyzes “Notes to my Biographer,” “The Good Doctor,” and “My Father’s Business” by Adam Haslett. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Concepts in Short Stories

    This 3 page paper discusses Kafka's short story "In a Penal Colony" and whether or not it represents procedural justice and argues that it does not. Then it discusses Willa Cather's work "Paul's Case," "The Country Doctor" by Balzac and "The Swimmer" by Cheever, and argues that only Neddy in the swimmer would be considered to have a life that Sisyphus would applaud. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Ahab and Faustus, Deals with the Devil Seen in Melville and Marlowe

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the characters of Faustus, in "Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe, and Ahab, in "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville, essentially sell their souls to the devil. No additional sources cited.

  • The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and its Themes

    This 8 page paper addresses gender themes of course, but also delves into other areas such as human inner strength and the role of the doctor in society. Symbolism is discussed in depth, particularly in respect to the meaning of the wallpaper, the fact that the author chose yellow as its color, and even the names utilized for several characters. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • A Review of The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down

    This 3 page paper discusses the book "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down" by Anne Fadiman; it deals with the consequences of a culture clash between a Hmong family with a very sick child and American doctors, and what happens when the two sides cannot understand each other. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Knowledge Theme in 'Paradise Lost' by John Milton and Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 5 page research paper that examines the use of the theme of knowledge in Christopher Marlowe's late sixteenth century play, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, and John Milton's mid-seventeenth century epic poem, Paradise Lost,. The writer argues that each author addresses the issue of predestination and free will in determining the relationship of knowledge to God's will. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Characters in 'The Cook,' 'The Shipman,' 'The Doctor' and 'The Guildsmen' in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales

    This 5 page paper looks at the characters of the guildsmen, the Cook, the shipman and the doctor in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and how they are portrayed as negative characters. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • Analyzing the Tragedy Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 5 page paper which examines what elements this work possesses which qualify it as a literary tragedy. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • "My Own Country: A Doctor's Story"

    This 5 page paper discusses the book "My Own Country" by Abraham Verghese, who worked with AIDS patients in rural Tennessee in the 1980s. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Aspects of Doctor Zhivago

    5 pages in length. Assessing the extent to which the Russian Revolution impacted Pasha Antipov requires one to establish an inherent association between an idealist "whose rage for order overwhelms his moral values" (Doctor Zhivago) and a war that was directly due to the czarist regime collapse from the insurmountable pressure of World War I and a backward economic situation that proved impossible to overcome in the face of Germany's industrialization. Antipov's visionary approach to the social and political world around him was not meant to sustain the weight of revolution; because of the immense internal suffering he endured, he felt life was no longer worth the effort and committed suicide – a painful and final gesture on his part to illustrate just how much he could not tolerate his own failure. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Hunter Thompson/Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    A 7 page analysis of Hunter S. Thompson's 1971 novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which is quasi-autobiographical, as Thompson gives himself and his lawyer, Oscar Acosta, the pseudonyms of Raoul Duke (a Doctor of Journalism) and Dr. Gonzo, who is described as being a 300-pound Samoan. A central premise of this trip to Las Vegas is that tourism can be used as a means for addressing the concept of the American Dream. A surface reading of Thompson's satirical novel tends to see it as celebratory of the 1960's drug culture; however, closer examination of this novel reveals it as a scathing critique of American culture and specifically the American dream, and also a denunciation of the drug culture of the 1960s. No additional sources cited.

  • Yellow Wallpaper & Female Marginalization

    A 5 page research paper/essay that discusses Charlotte Perkins Gilman's short story "The Yellow Wallpaper" (1899), which can be understood as indicative of women's role in late nineteenth century society. This narrative portrays the way in which Victorian patriarchal attitudes served to marginalize women. Male authority trivialized female voices and regarded women more as children in adult bodies than as adult themselves. In addition to this element, Gilman's short story also introduces the way in which the medical professional interacted with women, supporting the cultural paradigm that marginalized women and added the authority of the male doctor to the social boundaries that keep women from having any sense of adult autonomy. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson's Autobiographical Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    A 5 page essay that makes the point that on the surface, there is little to connect The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde to the events that make up the life of its author Robert Louis Stevenson. Jekyll was English; Stevenson was born in Scotland. Jekyll was a scientist, a doctor; Stevenson a lawyer by education and a writer by profession, and, of course, the fundamental premise of the novel, which is that Jekyll transforms into Hyde, is in the realm of science fiction. However, if one looks below the surface and consider this work for what it says about Stevenson's Victorian mindset, autobiographical aspects begin to emerge. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Fictional Literature, Determinism, and Free Will

    A 10 page exploration of the short stories encompassed by Miguel de Unamuno and Eric Bentley in their books “Abel Sanchez and Other Stories” (Unamuno) and “Life is a Dream: (Bentley). Unamuno’s book contains the short stories “Abel Sanchez”, “The Madness of Doctor Montarco”, and “San Manuel Bueno, Matyr” while Bentley’s “Life is a Dream” encompasses translations of Calderon's “La Vida es un Sueño” (Life is a Dream), Lope de Vega's “Fuente Ovejuna” (Fountain of Youth), and Tirso de Molina's “Don Juan”. Each of these stories add insight to our understanding of the free will verses determinism debate. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe and Hamlet by William Shakespeare

    In five pages this comparative analysis considers how both protagonists regard redemption and how they are conflicted by their moral concepts of good and evil in these respective plays. There are no additional sources in the bibliography.

  • Ethical Considerations in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    A 5 page comparison of Victor Frankenstein himself with the Creature he made. The paper characterizes Dr. Victor Frankenstein as a portrait of all those scientific over-achievers who give no heed to the ethics of their experimentations, and Victor's Creature as the representation all those victims who have to live with the effects. Bibliography lists three sources.

  • The 'Sir Patrick Spence Poem

    A 3 page essay that analyzes "Sir Patrick Spence," a medieval poem (author unknown) that was written in the twelfth century. The poet relates how Sir Patrick Spence set to see on the king's command and met with watery grave. The poem is a sea saga that is told in vivid images, which serve to connect the modern reader to the real human feeling of loss that is portrayed in the verse. No additional sources cited.

  • The Culture of the Beowulf Poem

    A 7 page essay that analyzes the Old English epic poem Beowulf in regards to what the poem tells the modern reader about this culture. The writer discusses what sort of traits were admired by this culture, what they disdained, and what they considered to be the traits of good leader. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight' and Setting

    A 4 page paper which discusses the use of setting in the epic poem, and considers what physical or geographical settings are important, in what ways the setting helps to set the mood of the poem, what it reveals about character, and how various settings compare and contrast with each other. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Wordsworth/Solitary Reaper

    A 4 page essay that offers summation and analysis of Williams Wordsworth's "The Solitary Reaper, a poem which offers a romantic view of what was undoubtedly a common sight during his lifetime for anyone traveling through the countryside--a person reaping the grain harvest on some rural farmstead. The context of the poem implies the everyday nature of this occurrence. However, Wordsworth's romantic vision teaches his reader to perceive this young woman, reaping and singing to herself, with new eyes and to consider how this ordinary scene was uniquely beautiful. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Move' by Lucille Clifton

    A 4 page explication of Clifton's poem "Move," which was written to commemorate the bombing of Philadelphia Afro-centric movement in Philadelphia in 1985. The writer argues that Clifton's poem is an indictment against the black mayor of Philadelphia at that time for authorizing the attack. No additional sources cited.

  • Langston Hughes/Critical Response to 2 Poems

    A 9 page research paper that discusses 2 poems by Langston Hughes (1902-1967), who has been termed the “Shakespeare of Harlem,” as he is credited with some of the finest poetry to emerge from that “great flowering of African-American literature known as the Harlem Renaissance” (Sundquist 55). Two of his poems, “Harlem,” which is also known under the title “Dream Deferred,” and “I, Too, Sing America” exemplify the radical protest spirit that characterizes a great deal of Hughes’ verse. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Christianity in Beowulf

    A 6 page research paper/essay that discusses Christian symbols in the epic poem Beowulf. This poem has its origins in pagan culture, but it was recorded by a Christian scribe (Saupe 97). Therefore there are “overlays” that color the narrative with Christian religious meaning (Saupe 97). This examination of the Christian overlay of meaning in Beowulf attempts to discern if this Christian influence changes in the descriptions of Beowulf’s three quests, or remains uniform throughout. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'And Death Shall Have No Dominion' by Dylan Thomas

    An 11 page research paper/essay that analyzes Thomas' poem "And death shall have no dominion." The writer argues that in this poem, it is not religion that Thomas honors, but the idea behind Christian dogma, which is that there is life from death-- an idea, which Thomas argues in his verse is self-evident in nature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Sonnet Uses of Hopkins

    A 9 page research paper/essay that analyzes four of Hopkins's poems in relation to how they demonstrate Hopkins' use of the sonnet form. The poems "God's Grandeur," "The Windhover," "As Kingfishers Catch Fire," and "Carrion Comfort" are explicated. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Infant Joy' and 'Infant Sorrow' Poems by William Blake

    A 4 page essay that discusses Blake's intentions with his poems Songs of Innocence and Experience. The writer explicates and contrasts "Infant Joy" and "Infant Sorrow" and also discusses both poems by Blake entitled "The Chimney Sweeper." No additional sources cited.

  • Mallarme, Baudelaire and Goethe

    This 4 page paper discusses the poem “Afternoon of a Faun” by Mallarme; and the poem “Correspondences” by Baudelaire; and how these two symbolic works compare to Goethe’s works. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Blake and Wordsworth

    A 6 page essay that offers 2 3-page essays: one on William Blake’s “Chimney Sweep” poems and one on William Wordsworth’s “The World is Too Much With Us Late and Soon.” The writer in each case uses the poems to discuss each poet’s poetic philosophy and style. No additional sources cited.

  • W.B. Yeats/An Irish Airman Foresees His Death

    A 3 page essay that analyzes this Yeats poem. During World War I, millions of young men lost their lives. In his poem “An Irish Airman foresees his Death,” Irish poet W.B. Yeats explores why one particular young man, a pilot, engages in that awful conflict and how he views his death, which he knows is sure to come. The words that Yeats selects and the pilot’s manner of speaking tells the reader a great deal about how Yeats imagined this man’s character. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Nineteen' by Elizabeth Alexander

    A 4 page explication of Alexander's poem "Nineteen, which captures the essence of her style, which is free flowing and lyrical. Explication of this poem shows that Alexander, like other experts of the free verse style such as Whitman, has the ability to capture the essence and spirit of a time, place and age through the voice of her youthful narrator/protagonist, which expresses the poet's impressions and memories in free verse. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'The Gift Outright' by Robert Frost

    This 6 page report discusses 1942 poem by Robert Frost titled “The Gift Outright.” He recited it at the inauguration ceremony for President John F. Kennedy in 1961. The poem opens by describing the fact that the early settlers in the North American colonies thought of the land they were cultivating as simply “their” land and continues in only 16 lines to show the connection between Americans and the land mass that is the United States. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Love and Marriage Disappointments

    A 5 page paper which examines “A Story of an Hour” by , “A Doll’s House” by Ibsen, and three poems as they present the reader with a look at the disappointments often found in love and marriage. The poems discussed are “Aunt Jennifer’s Tiger” and “Moving in Winter” by Adrienne Rich and “Ex-Husband” by Gabriel Spera. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Poems of William Blake and Theodicy

    An 8 page paper which examines how the theme of theodicy is interwoven into Blake’s poetic works, “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience” such that the reading of a single poem can be influenced or altered by its relationship to other poems in the collection. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • 'Sonnet 54' in Amoretti by Edmund Spenser

    A 7 page paper that explicates Spenser's Sonnet 54. This close reading of the poem offers a line-by-line interpretation of the poem, discussion of its meter and rhyme scheme, and also Spenser's use of poetic devices. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Blackberry Sweet' by Dudley Randall

    A 3 page essay that explicates this seduction poem by Dudley Randall. Also known as "Black Magic," this poem concerns Randall's description of a black girl's beauty and the effect that this has on the poet. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Cross' by Langston Hughes

    A 3 page essay that explicates Langston Hughes' poem "Cross," which refers to the "cross" that the narrator has to bear, which is his mixed-race heritage. Due to this heritage, the narrator of the poem feels that he has no cultural "home," as he does not fit with either white or black society. Unlike current society in which mixed-raced individuals, such as golfer Tiger Woods, are regarded simply as "people," in the first half of the twentieth century, which is when this poem was composed, this was not the case. No additional sources cited.

  • D.H. Lawrence/The Piano

    A 3 page research paper/essay that discusses this poem and D.H. Lawrence. It is something of a quandary for modern readers as to how to evaluate the poetry and fiction of D.H. Lawrence. Praised in previous eras, he has been castigated by many critics, particularly feminist theorists, who view his work through the lens of current sensibilities towards political correctness. The following discussion, first of all, reviews briefly how Lawrence has been viewed before evaluating his poem "Piano", which was completed in 1918. This analysis argues that when viewed as a product of Lawrence's time, i.e., this poem conveys the reality of male emotional experience rather than the Victorian preconceptions of his era. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'I HAD been hungry all these years' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page explication of Emily Dickinson's poignant poem "I HAD been hungry all the years." In this poem, Dickinson offers images of what life's banquet is liked when viewed by someone who feels like an outsider. Dickinson was a recluse most of her life and seldom ventured from her home. Examination of this poem suggests that, at some point in her life, she had the opportunity to experience more than her solitary existence and that the "plenty" of this occurrence was both painful and revealing to her. No additional sources cited.

  • Contemporary Chinese Poetry's Thematic and Linguistic Structure

    An 11 page discussion of the linguistic and thematic structure of modern Chinese poetry. Analyzes the poem “Into the Mountains” by Yang Mu to present examples of metaphor, simile, comparison, and personification. This paper emphasizes that essentially modern Chinese poetry relies on the same use of semantics as do Western forms of poetry. Other considerations enter the picture, however, when these poems are translated into English. In this instance, the translator has essentially as much power as the poet in changing subtle components of a poem with the manipulation of the English words which he uses to convey the meaning. While it is useful to analyze the semantics of modern Chinese poetry from an operative structure standpoint therefore, it is perhaps even more useful to analyze this poetry from a thematic standpoint. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Love in Geoffrey Chaucer's 'Parliament of Fowles' and 'The Book of the Duchesse'

    A 14 page research paper that argues that love plays a pivotal thematic role in two of Geoffrey Chaucer's greatest poems, The Book of the Duchesse and The Parliament of Fowles. While Chaucer is acknowledged as one of the greatest and most eloquent advocates of love in English literature, in these poems, he qualified his endorsement and dedication to love by placing it within certain institutional and societal boundaries. In The Book of the Duchesse, his elegy of consolation over the death of the Black Knight's lady is couched within the parameters established by the conventions of courtly love. Likewise, while the Parliament of Fowles is a love poem, Chaucer pictures love as susceptible to certain natural laws that should be meticulously followed. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Forgiving My Father' by Lucille Clifton

    A 4 page essay that explicates Lucille Clifton's poem "forgiving my father." The writer argues that this poem concerns the legacy of a childhood made harsh by a father's inability to provide for his family. Clifton, as a woman, identifies most heavily with her mother's anger and disappointment at having married a man who could not provide for his family. However, within the context of this poem, Clifton comes to perceive that her mother's anger is not necessarily her own and that she can forgive them both and, in doing so, move on with her own life. No additional sources cited.

  • Explication of 'London' by Poet William Blake

    A 3 page essay that explicates William Blake's poem London. The writer argues that Blake was frequently critical of English society in his poetry, subtly attacking many of the established institutions and cultural ideas of his era. In his poem "London," Blake paints a portrait of the city that depicts it has having fallen into moral chaos. Appalled at the suffering, poverty, prostitution and mistreatment of children, Blake's poem is scathing social commentary that was intended to open the eyes of the upper classes to the degradation of their society as a whole. London is also briefly compared to Blake's The Chimney Sweeper. No additional sources cited.

  • 'A Prayer for My Son' by William Butler Yeats

    A 7 page essay that offers a detailed explication of W.B. Yeats' poem "A Prayer for My Son," which is one of most religious poems, yet it also has secular aspects. By combining these two tonal features, Yeats demonstrates how the divine is intrinsically connected to the cares of everyday life. In this poem, the speaker, by beginning with this relationship to his son, extrapolates from the microcosm of his family life to the macrocosm of the relationship between the divine and humanity, and, in so doing, offers reassurance on the protective quality of love, both human and divine. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • An Analysis of Virgil's Depiction of the Tragedy of Dido

    A 3 page essay that examines Book Four of Virgil's epic poem of Rome's founding, the Aeneid, which relates the tragic love of Dido for the epic's hero Aeneas. This section of the poem pictures the course of Dido's love in five stages, which range from her realization that she loves Aeneas to her suicide, as his ships sail away. Throughout this narrative, Virgil pictures love as the equivalent to disease, an external force that subverts attention from what it truly important in life, that is, one's responsibilities. The implication in the poem is that Aeneas, being male, is better able to keep a proper focus than is the hapless, lovelorn Dido. No additional sources cited.

  • t.s. eliot's 'The Waste Land' and Maud Ellmann's 'A Sphinx Without a Secret'

    A 3 page essay that summarizes and discusses Maud Ellmann's "A Sphinx Without a Secret: The Waste Land," a critique of the poem by T.S. Eliot. Ellmann begins her discussion of T.S. Eliot's poem The Waste Land by comparing it to a phrase from an Oscar Wild's story, saying that the work is an example of a "sphinx without a secret" (Ellmann 258). In so doing, Ellmann begins her detailed and insightful examination of Eliot, which looks at this poem from a psychoanalytical perspective, which favors a post-structuralist reading of the text. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Ode to a Grecian Urn' and 'To Autumn' by John Keats

    A 7 page essay that analyzes Keats' "To Autumn" and "Ode to a Grecian Urn," with a primary focus on "To Autumn." It is Keats' rich use of language that pays tribute to this season. As the poem progresses, Keats piles up sensory images in much the same way as a farmer piles up his harvest. An examination of this poem, in comparison with another poem that exemplifies Keats' style, the famous "Ode to a Grecian Urn" reveals Keats' optimistic outlook, a perspective that found meaning in the ordinary events of life, as well as in great art. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Modernist Approaches in 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot

    This is a 5 page paper discussing effective aspects of modernism used by T.S. Eliot in his poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”. T.S. Eliot (1888-1965) uses modernist writing methods to go beyond reality and realism within his poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”. One of his methods used is that of “objective correlative” in which strings of elements are connected throughout the poem in order to transmit the mixed emotions of the narrator; in this case ones of hope and hopelessness for the ongoing passing of time. Time within the poem is not measured in the traditional realistic elements of hours, days or weeks but instead by the thinness of his hair, the thinness of his arms and his life measured out by “coffee spoons”. While the narrator slips us through different dimensions of time, he also does so in regards to space when he refers to the realistic daily aspects of his life and then contemplates the universe and the endless questions which accompany it. Overall, while Eliot’s poem clearly takes place in a modern lonely city, the time and space components contemplated by the narrator take the reader beyond reality and leaves readers emotionally unsettled; emotions shared by the narrator. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Discussion of Christian Elements in the Epic Poem Beowulf, and in the Character of Beowulf Himself

    This is a 10 page paper discussing Beowulf as a Christian and Christian elements in the poem “Beowulf”. Beowulf, written by an unknown author in 8th century England, tells the tale of a young hero, Beowulf as he defeats evil monsters in order to defend his people. He arrives in the story as one who is already well known for his victories over monsters and in addition, he is virtuous and good and benefits his victories in battle to the grace of God. He relates tales of how God calmed the seas in order for him to be able to see the sea monsters and slay them. When he is fighting the evil Grendel, a descendent from Cain, and Grendel’s mother, he asks that God give victory to the one He believes is the most good and believes that his victories would not have been successful without God’s assistance. Many pagan elements appear in the poem, such as monsters, which no doubt reflects the overall situation and conflict between the pagan and Christian religions which existed in England at that time. The heavy Christian influence in the poem however, is reflected in the Christian Beowulf overcoming the powerful pagan monsters. Overall, Beowulf the hero, and Beowulf the poem can both be considered Christian in their faith, symbolism and the elements of strength seen as rewards for Christian goodness and virtue. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Hero and Leander/Marlowe

    A 4 page essay that discusses the homoerotic passages in Christopher Marlowe's sixteenth century poem Hero and Leander. No additional sources are cited.

  • Robert Browning's 'My Last Duchess'

    A 3 page essay that addresses Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess." This poem presents a dramatic monologue, in which a duke is discussing his art collection with the emissary of a family with whom the duke is negotiating the details of an arranged marriage. The duke stops before a portrait of his last duchess and begins to recount a story that is clearly intended to relay a message to the family concerning the duke's expectations for his next wife. In presenting the duke's diatribe against his previous duchess, Browning, in many ways, contrasts the restricted Classical worldview against the more humanistic Romantic worldview. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Review of Homer's 'The Iliad'

    A 6 page book review that summarizes and analyzes aspects of this classic epic poem. The Iliad, by the ancient Greek poet Homer, is one of the greatest poetic epics in history. This poem has held readers in thrall for millennia as there is it is a grand tale of heroic adventure. As time has past, its allure has increased due to the fact that Homer's storytelling prowess opens a window for the modern reader that reveals another time, an ancient era, with its mores, customs, traditions, beliefs and lifestyle illustrated in the lives of the Greek and Trojan heroes. In accomplishing this, the Iliad reveals a pagan world whose orientation is quite different from the Western world known to the reader. Thematic content is also discussed. No additional sources cited.

  • Poems for Children by Shel Silverstein and Robert Louis Stevenson

    A 3 page essay that contrasts and compares children's poems by these two poets. Being able to recreate the magic and joy of childhood and to do it from the child's perspective is a rare gift that few poets have exhibited. Two poets who manage to accomplish this feat are Shel Silverstein and nineteenth century author Robert Louis Stevenson. Examination of a representative poem demonstrates not only the technical virtuosity of each poet, but also the fact that each man managed to capture a child's narrative voice without talking down to their young readers, but rather showing empathy and understanding of a child's world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Mourning and Separaton in the Poems of John Donne and W.H. Auden

    A 3 page essay that contrasts and compares poems by these two poets. Separation from a loved one, either through death or prolonged absence, engenders the natural response of mourning. In his poem "Funeral Blues," W.H. Auden captures in metaphors the heart-wrenching experience of losing a loved one. John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning" also uses metaphor in order to offer solace to his beloved concerning a prolonged separation. In both cases, the poets capture the experience of mourning the creative use of metaphor. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparing Achilles and Odysseus

    In 5 pages the author compares the heroes in the 'Odyssey' and the 'Iliad.' Homer's 'Iliad' and his 'Odyssey' are both epic Greek poems. The hero in Homer's 'Odyssey' was Odysseus, and the hero in Homer's 'Iliad' was Achilles. Both poems were written by Homer, and many similarities as well as differences are seen between the two heroes. Although similar, those men were not carbon copies of each other, for they did have different characters. They were heroes first and foremost.

  • Analysis of Robert Frost's Poem 'The Road Less Traveled'

    This 5 page report discusses the short and apparently simple poem “The Road Less Traveled” written by Robert Frost that describes a traveler who chooses between two paths that diverge in the woods. it is clear throughout his writing that Frost also understood that the “order” of nature was such that it defined the very existence of a human being. The poem, “The Road Not Taken,” is an example of how he constantly frames the actions and thinking of a person against the backdrop of the natural world. It also suggests that one’s choices in life can be dependent upon what one sees before them in the natural world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Poem (As the Cat)' by William Carlos Williams

    A 5 page essay that discusses the imagery in this poem. The poetry of William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) uses imagery that typically refers to everyday experiences and concrete images that describe material objects. Goodblatt and Glicksohn propose that comprehending a metaphor is akin to problem solving, "in its more creative form," and that this involves "an act of perceptual and semantic restructuring. Considering this perspective, this analysis focuses on the imagery that Williams employs in his verse entitled "Poem (As the cat," which offers a typical example of Williams utilization of metaphor and imagery within a short lyric form. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Cultural Influences Exerted by the Life and Art of Robert Frost

    A 3 page essay that discusses the life of Robert Frost in connection with his poetry. Three poems are briefly analyzed and the writer relates what has been learned by this assignment. One of twentieth century America's greatest poets, Robert Frost (1874-1963), wrote verse that was not initially popular with the American public. For the first several decades of his adult life, Frost worked at a variety of jobs, and his family existed on the edge of poverty. He did not obtain financial stability and success as a poet until he was forty years old (Baym, et al 1762). Frost was a conservative poet who adhered to traditional forms and continued to write in the twentieth century the "kind of traditional poetry that modernists thought could no longer be written" (Baym, et al 1762). Through his remarkable use of imagery and also through his use of rhythm, which mirrors that of colloquial speech, Frost's poems often draw on the natural world to express complex meanings and nuances of understanding concerning life's major issues. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Dante's 9th Circle/A Contemporary Vision

    A 5 page research paper that discusses Dante Alighieri's medieval masterpiece The Divine Comedy. The writer states that this poem is a profound statement on medieval theology, but is also a commentary by Dante on medieval society. These verses picture Dante, being led by the pagan poet Virgil, through Hell, Purgatory and Heaven. In Hell, i.e., The Inferno, Dante pictures meeting notorious sinners: some contemporary with his era; some from the past. This inspires the question of how the present day's most notorious compare to those whom Dante included in his epic poem. The writer discusses John Walker Lindh, Timothy McVeigh, Jeffrey Dahmer and the Unabomber in relation to where they would go in the Ninth Circle of Dante's vision of Hell. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Dante’s Inferno & Humanism

    A 3 page essay that discusses “The Inferno” from Dante’s medieval epic poem The Divine Comedy. This poem describes the experience of the author, led by the specter of the ancient Roman poet Virgil, through a journey of spiritual enlightenment that takes him through Hell, Purgatory and finally to Heaven. The punishments that are inflicted on the souls in Hell strike Dante, as a character in the poem, as inhumane, but Dante, the poet, makes it clear that each punishment is ideally suited as retribution for the sins committed by these souls while the individuals were alive on earth. Therefore, as the poem’s narrator moves through Hell, he receives progressive lessons pertaining to what it means to be fully human and fully in accord with the expectations of God. No additional sources cited.

  • 2 Carpe Diem Poems

    A 4 page essay that explicates 2 carpe diem poems. Carpe diem, a Latin phrase meaning “cease the day,” is a favorite theme found in seventeenth century poetry. Two of the most famous carpe diem poems from this era are Robert Herrick’s “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” and Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress.” An examination of these poems indicates that while Herrick makes effective use of imagery in order to argue his carpe diem seduction theme, Marvell’s poem is the most effective. No additional sources cited.

  • A Poetic Analysis of 'Homecoming' by Lenrie Peters

    This is 4 page paper meant as an explication of Lenrie Peters’ poem “Homecoming”. Gambian poet and novelist Lenrie Peters was born in 1932 in Bathurst, the capital of Gambia during the time when Gambia was still a British colony. The background of Peters and that of his country is important when analyzing his poem “Homecoming” as readers can better understand the climate in which he left Gambia to become educated and that to which he returned many years later. The poem “Homecoming” is among his collection which shows the corruptive greed of the tribal leaders while at the same time is balanced by “nostalgia for a pastoral past with cautious assertion of hope for a future built on that past”. Peters’ “Homecoming” writes of the sadness and strange shadows and skeletons which awaited him when he returned to Gambia to which he had “longed for returning”. The poem can be analyzed through several meanings including literal, connoted, figurative, imagery, allusions and tone among others. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • War's Realities and Poetry

    This 4 page paper considers the similarities between two different poems; Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen and Patterns by Amy Lowell. Both of these poems depict the horror and haut caused by war, but are written form different –perspectives. The paper examines the meaning of the poems and the ways in which they present the impact that war can have at a personal level. Quotes from the poems are used to illustrate points raised. The bibliography cites 2 sources.

  • Advancing Age in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats

    A 5 page essay that summarizes and analyzes 3 poems by Yeats. In three of his best poems, William Butler Yeats addresses the age-old topic of mortality and the bitterness of advancing age. These poems are "Among School Children," "Sailing to Byzantium," and "Byzantium." These three poems thematically share and develop Yeats' thoughts relative to the loss of youth and the decline and decay of the human body contrasted against what is eternal in human experience, which is the medium of art and the striving of the soul toward perfection. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Sexual Imagery/Depression in 3 Poems By Robert Frost

    A 5 page essay that analyzes 3 poems by Frost. Robert Frost is one of America's best-loved poets. His use of evocative and lyrical natural imagery speaks to a broad audience. However, in addition to the folksy wisdom, there is tension in many of Frost's poems that subtly intimates both his battles with lifelong depression, as well as conflicted feelings toward sex. The following examination of 3 of Frost's poems, "Acquainted wit the Night," "The Road Not Taken," and "Birches," demonstrates that below the literal surface meaning of these poems, Frost invites the reader to look deeper into his perception. No additional sources cited.

  • Nature and Poetic Views Contrasted

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares four poems, --"A Sick Rose" by William Blake; "Apparently with no surprise" by Emily Dickinson; "Digging" by Seamus Heaney; and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" by Robert Frost. The writer argues that in these poems the reader encounters brilliant imagery that perfectly invokes scenes of nature in the reader's imagination. However, examination of these four poems shows that the poets intend their verse to send very different messages. Blake and Dickinson picture nature as beautiful, but unfeeling. Their poems see nature as evidence of a divine power that can be capricious in its cruelty. Frost and Heaney, on the other hand, picture nature as soothing, positive and more benign. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • 'Smile' in the Poetry of Robert Browning and Dorothy Parker

    A 3 page essay on the use of the world "smile" in 2 poems. Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess" and Dorothy Parker in "A Certain Lady" create poems that employ the word "smile." "Smile" in each poem refers to the standard meaning of the word, that is, a facial expression in which the corners of the mouth turn upward, indicating pleasure or amusement; however, this word is employed quite differently within the context of each poem. Browning's Duke Ferrara condemns his "last duchess" because she smiled too freely and too genuinely and did not keep her smiles as something belonging solely to him. Dorothy Parker's "certain lady" convinces her lover that her special smiles are only for him, but admits that they hide a duplicitous heart. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparison of the Poems by Christina Rossetti and John Milton

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares works by Milton and Rossetti. John Milton (1608-1674), in his epic poem Paradise Lost, and Christina Rossetti (1830-1894), in her poem The Goblin Market, each present narratives in which women are tempted by sin that is represented allegorically by fruit. In each poem, there are also depictions of acts of love. But while these features indicate that the poems bear similarities, they also have fundamental differences that deal mainly with the poet's depiction of women. Eve is depicted as shallow, easily deceived and not capable of thinking as rationally as Adam. Rossetti's heroine, Lizzie, on the other hand, is clever, self-sacrificing, and saves her sister from sin through her actions. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and Imagery

    A 5 page essay that discusses Andrew Marvell's seduction poem "To His Coy Mistress." In this poem, Marvell (1621-1678) employs striking use of imagery delineates both the pleasure involved in "ceasing the day" (carpe diem) and the shortness of time, which is the philosophy's rationale. The first half of the poem employs imagery to establish a sense of intimacy between Marvell and his lover. The second half employs time imagery to focus on the point that life is short. Collectively, this argument makes this one of English literature's most persuasive seduction poems. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Dialogue between the Soul and the Body' by Andrew Marvell

    A 3 page essay that explicates Marvell's poem "A Dialogue between the Soul and the Body." In this poem, Marvell addresses the duality of human nature. Examination of Marvell's thought on this topic shows that he considers the perspective of the soul and the body to be contradictory. No additional sources cited.

  • Analysis of the Poem 'The Elixir' by George Herbert

    A 3 page explication of the poem featured in the 1633 collection of religious poetry, “The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations.” No additional sources are used.

  • Maya Angelou/Phenomenal Woman

    A 4 page essay that offers an explication and analysis of this poem. Throughout the course of human history, men haven been primarily admired for their accomplishments, but the focus of admiration for women has been on whether or not their appearance fit with what a particular society considered beautiful. In her poem "Phenomenal Woman," Maya Angelou challenges this pervasive cultural feature and asserts that she is extraordinary and immensely attractive, without fitting within any of society's preconceived notions of how female beauty and attractiveness should be defined and conceptualized. No additional sources cited.

  • Lord Byron, We'll Go No More A-Roving

    A 5 page research paper/essay that analyzes this poem by George Gordon, Lord Byron. A close examination of this poem and where it fits in Byron's life suggests a negative view of Bryon, both as a poet and as an individual. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Explication of George Herbert's "Virtue"

    A 4 page explication that describes George Herbert's early seventeenth century poem "Vertue" (Virtue). The writer explains how the main point of the poem is the immortality of the virtuous soul. No additional sources cited.

  • The Warrior Culture of Beowulf

    This 5 page research paper examines the Old English epic poem of Beowulf in terms of what the poem conveys about the warrior culture of the Germanic tribes that were the forebears of the English. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Parliament of Fowles' by Geoffrey Chaucer

    A 5 page paper that discusses the structure and thematic content of Geoffrey Chaucer's poem "Parliament of Fowles," which is one of the first Valentine's poems. The writer argues that Chaucer upholds love, but stresses that love should promote the "common profit," i.e. the common good. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Langston Hughes, An Overview

    A 5 page essay that offers background on the biography of Langston Hughes and then discussion of five of his poems: "Bad Man," "Cross," "Let American be America Again," "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" and "Silhouette." Bibliography lists these poems and 2 additional sources.

  • Imagery in Ulysses by James Joyce

    A 5 page essay on James Joyce's use of language and imagery in his novel Ulysses. This novel loosely (very loosely) follows the episodes created by Homer in his epic poem The Odyssey. The writer analyzes three chapters from Joyce's Ulysses and argues that, as far as language use is considered, it is similar to a prose poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Emily Dickinson's Views of Self and Society

    A 5 page essay that examines three of Dickinson's poems that deal with the self, how Dickinson saw herself and her society, "I'm Nobody! Who are You?," "Much Madness is divinest Sense," "The Soul selects her own Society." The writer argues that these poems give the reader insight into the remarkable personality of this nineteenth century poet. No additional sources cited.

  • Christian Allegory and 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

    A 5 page research paper, in which the writer argues that the traditional interpretation of "Mariner," which sees the poem as Christian allegory, comes closest to capturing its meaning. The writer also explores how the poem has been interpreted by various critics. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • A Reading of Emily Dickinson's 'After Great Pain…'

    A 5 page essay that offers an explication of Dickinson's poem "After Great Pain a Formal Feeling Comes." The writer argues that, in this poem, Dickinson indicates the various stages of recovery from traumatic pain. Her verse delineates the various stages that an individual goes through after experiencing great pain: the philosophical questions that one asks; the mechanical feeling of detachment; and, also, that the pain eventually ceases, if one survives it. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Coole Park and Ballylee, 1931' by William Butler Yeats

    A 5 page essay that examines Yeats' assertion in this poem that 'We were the last romantics…' (line 41). The writer argues that this is a fair assessment and that examining the context of the poem demonstrates Yeat's version of romanticism, which is embedded in his love of the Irish country. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Homer's 'The Iliad' and 'The Odyssey'

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Homer's famous epic poems. The themes of the poems are discussed as well as what type of audience Homer might have written each piece for. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Comparison of Poems by Keats and Blake

    A 3 page essay that compares "La Belle Dame sans Merci" by John Keats with William Blake's "The Divine Image." The writer first addresses their similarities by showing how both poems reflect the characteristics of Romantic poetry, but then differences are addressed by outlining the themes of each poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • 'The Children's Hour' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    A 5 page research paper that critically analyzes Longfellow's poem "The Children's Hour." The writer argues that this poem speaks directly to feelings that are basic to all humanity and this is why his verse, although no longer critically acclaimed, is so well loved and read throughout the world. The writer also discusses Longfellow's reputation and how his work is regarded. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Science According to the Poems of Walt Whitman and Edgar Allan Poe

    A 4 page essay that compares and contrasts 2 poems by Poe and Whitman. Poe's "Sonnet--To Science" and Whitman's "When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer," address not only the same subject matter, but also they take an identical stand on the topic. While Poe's poem is the most overt in its message, Whitman also takes the stand that science, specifically astronomy, attempts to drain the beauty and mystery from life and turns the wondrous into the mundane. No additional sources cited.

  • 'My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that discusses Emily Dickinson's poem number 754, "My Life has stood--a Loaded Gun," in which Dickinson represents herself and her life, metaphorically, as a loaded weapon, a phallic symbol that is associated with masculinity. The imagery, and the energy, that pervades the poem indicates Dickinson's deeply seated conflicted feelings concerning traditional concepts of masculinity and femininity and the symbolism she employs expresses her inner rage at the restricted nature of gender that was prevalent in Victorian society. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Poetic Portrayals of Icarus's Fall

    A 4 page review of the poems “Musee des Beaux” by W.H. Auden, “Landscape With the Fall of Icarus” by W. C. Williams, and “Waiting for Icarus” by Muriel Rukeyser. Interestingly the first two of these poems were inspired by the painting “Fall of Icarus” by Peter Breughel. The author of this paper describes the details of this painting and contrasts the styles of these three poets. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Richard Wilbur's Poem 'Love Calls Us to the Things of This World'

    An Explanation of the Poem by Richard Wilbur A 3 page discussion of Wilbur’s poem. The author of this paper provides a detailed discussion of the poet’s choice of words and discusses how this choice serves as a contrast between the spiritual and the earthly aspects of human existence. No additional sources are listed.

  • 'Ovid's Banquet of Sence' by George Chapman

    A 3 page essay that examines Chapman's sixteenth century poem "Ovid's Banquet of Sence." The writer discusses how Chapman assumed that his readers would be cognizant of numerous literary references and focuses on how Chapman's poem reflects Platonic ideals expressed by Diotima in Plato's Symposium. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • A Summary of The Song of Roland (Chanson de Roland)

    This 5 page report discusses the medieval poem 'The Song of Roland' or Chanson de Roland and summarizes the plot, describes the poem's characters and their roles, and briefly discusses the 'ideal' behavior of a knight, as well as chivalry in the middle ages of Europe. No additional sources cited.

  • History and 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page analytical essay that examines Homer's Iliad in terms of how the details of the poem reflect the culture and beliefs of Homer's era. The writer argues that the works of Homer, regardless of whether or not Homer actually existed or if his account of the Trojan War is historical accurate, definitely reflect the cultural concepts, beliefs, and worldview of the time in which these epic poems were composed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Placing a Historical Value on 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page paper which analyzes the epic poem from a historical context, considering if the events depicted are real, if the information can be verified, and examines the author’s intentions for writing the poem. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Dido's Character in 'The Aeneid' by Virgil

    A 5 page paper that reviews book four of Virgil's Aenead. This paper discusses Aeneas' duty, Dido's romantic passion, and the reason why this couple suffers such a tragic end. Also considered in this poem is the affect of Catullus' poem 64, and a comparison is made between the story of Ariadne and Theseus and Dido and Aeneas. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Beauty and Friendship in 3 of Sappho's Poems

    A 5 page research paper/essay that offer analysis of three of Sappho's poems. The writer argues that while her verse is notorious for its connection with Lesbianism, there is much more to Sappho's poetry than mere eroticism. An examination of her poems reveals a deep and passionate connection with nature and appreciation for beauty, which are sentiments that reach across time and space and speak to the modern reader, establishing a feeling of connection and friendship. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Poetic Analysis of William Butler Yeats' 'Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites'

    A 5 page analysis of the wording and underlying meaning of this Irish pub song. The author asserts that Yeats’ poem encapsulates the idealism and the bitterness of the Irish Civil War and that it also encapsulates the societal stature in which the Irish robed their heroes, a stature which was sufficient enough to resolve them of wrongdoing as well. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of John Keats' 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page review of this classic work of iterature. The author of this paper reviews some of the deeper connotations which the poem suggests. As in many of his poems, Keats’ emphasizes the specific beauty of an object or person in relation with the beauty of the setting in which that object or person existed. The most profound, and indeed heavily debated pronouncement of the poem, however, is the observation that beauty is truth. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Emily Dickinson and the Poems of Fascicle Twenty-Eight

    A 14 page research paper that examines the poems in fascicle 28, a division that refers to packets of poems that Dickinson grouped together herself. The writer offers a brief explication of each poem, emphasizing thematic content and how the individual poems fit with the overall pattern. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Eyes That Last I Saw in Tears' by T.S. Eliot

    A 6 page research paper/analysis of Eliot's poem "Eyes that Last I Saw in Tears." The writer argues that this poem conveys a haunting sense of regret, sorrow and, also, lingering guilt. The poem does not inform the reader as to why the memory of a look, the image of crying eyes, haunts the poet, yet an examination of this work clearly shows that this is what is taking place. Considering this fact, it seems logical to look at possible circumstances in Eliot's life that could have provided the impetus for this poem. By looking at both the poem and at certain known facts about Eliot's life, it is possible to find further illumination on the meaning of the poem from understanding the basis for Eliot's failed marriage. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Robert Lowell/Skunk Hour

    A 7 page explication of Robert Lowell's poem "Skunk Hour," which was written in 1959 and describes Lowell's impressions of a Maine sea town (Lowell 131). At the beginning of the poem, that is, the first four stanzas, Lowell describes a sterile, decaying setting, which he tries to lighten with a "tone of tolerance, humor and randomness at the sad prospect" (Lowell 131). However, even in this section of the poem, Lowell's perspective drifts as it "sinks out of sight into the causal, chancy arrangements of nature and decay" (Lowell 131). Then, in the later half of the poem, i.e., the last four stanzas, Lowell's tone dramatically changes as he describes the "dark night" of his soul, which is not "gracious, but secular, puritan and agnostical. An Existentialist night" (Lowell 132). A close reading of this poem demonstrates the accuracy of Lowell's personal assessment of his poem's meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Out Far Nor in Deep' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page research paper that analyzes this Frost poem. The writer first discusses the form of the poem and then takes the poem stanza by stanza to discuss the meaning of its images and metaphors, drawing on scholarly and personal interpretation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • 'Because I could not stop for Death' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Emily Dickinson's poem. The writer argues that in this poem, Dickinson presents a rather cordial view of death, which she personifies as a courtly gentleman. Her verse proposes that death entails an adjustment in perspective from the human state of awareness toward one that is universal. In other words, the poem describes a period of adjustment in which the speaker adjusts to a new state of awareness and being. No additional sources cited.

  • Linguistic Analysis of Thomas Hardy's Poem 'Darkling Thrush'

    A 10 page linguistically oriented analysis of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush." The writer offers an examination of this poem that explores syntax, phonology, morphology, and lexicon/cohesion. Analysis addresses the poem line-by-line, sometimes word-by-word. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Over There, World War II,' and 'I Sing, Too, America' by Langston Hughes

    An 8 page research paper/essay that analyzes two of Hughes poems, "I, too, Sing America" and "Over there, World War II." First, the writer gives a brief biography of the poet, then discusses critical opinion of his work, and then, critically analyzes these two poems. The writer demonstrates how the political content of these poems was aimed at both a black and white audience. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Estates Satire and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

    This 6 page paper discusses Estates Satire and how Chaucer uses it in his poem.

  • 'The Negro Speaks of Rivers' by Langston Hughes

    A 5 page essay that explicates the many layers of meaning in this poem by Hughes. The writer argues that this poem presents a vision of African American culture and life that was totally different from the one that existed at the time of the poem's publication (the 1920s). No additional sources cited.

  • Political Reflections in 'The Inferno' and Divine Comedy of Dante

    A 5 page overview of the primary structure and plot of this fourteenth century classic poem. Discusses the literary classification of the poem and the historical and political circumstances under which it was written. The author contends that while Dante’s work is influenced to some degree by the historical setting, it is not limited to a discourse on politics. “Inferno”, in particular, is considered the greatest medieval poem and holds many political as well as religious parallels. No additional sources are listed.

  • Poe/Annabel Lee

    A 3 page explication of Edgar Allan Poe's last poem, Annabel Lee, which was written in 1849. The writer argues that this poem is a haunting tribute by the still grieving Poe for his young wife Virginia who had passed away two years previously from tuberculosis. Examination of this poem's theme, mood and point-of-view demonstrates the depth of emotion that Poe had for his deceased child/bride, as well as how he viewed his own death with equanimity because he saw it as uniting him with his beloved. No additional sources cited.

  • Mixture of Christianity and Paganism in 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (circa 1375-1400). The writer argues that this poem is an amalgamation of Christian and pagan elements, which are discussed and substantiated with quotes from the poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Meaning of 'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the meaning behind Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy." The writer points out that throughout the poem, images of men jumble together, some of her father, some of her ex-husband, some that present attempts by Plath to understand her father through his Germanic background. Collectively, along with the intentionally schoolgirl-like rhymes, the poem conveys the black desperation of a lost little girl, which definitely was Plath's psychic state at that time. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Wood Pile' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page explication of Robert Frost's poem "The Wood-Pile." The writer summarizes the poem, and then examines it closely, line by line, as to Frost's use of poetic devices, as well as the poem's thematic meaning. No additional sources cited.

  • Wordsworth & Hardy/Perspectives on Nature

    A 3 page essay that observes that both William Wordsworth, in 1838, and Thomas Hardy, in 1900, wrote poems that were inspired by the beautiful song of the thrush. But while these two poems share a common topic, the Romantic approach and exuberant optimism of Wordsworth is quite different from the dark skepticism that characterized the Victorian worldview exemplified by Hardy. Nevertheless, examination of the two poems shows that each poet took inspiration and encouragement from the thrush, each in his own way. No additional sources cited.

  • Gary Soto/”Oranges”

    A 3 page explications of “Oranges,” a poem by Gary Soto, which is evocative of innocence, as it tells of the narrator’s experience on his first “date” with a girl. This memory is obviously a profound one for the narrator and the reason for the memory’s significance in this man’s life is largely conveyed through the poem’s lyrical imagery and symbolism. A close reading of the poem and examination of this feature demonstrates this point. No additional sources cited.

  • Life and Works of Sylvia Plath

    An introduction to Plath's life and works, including a commentary on three of her poems, Daddy, Lady Lazarus and Morning Song.

  • Influences of Nature and Biography in the Works of Emily Dickinson

    This is a 5 page paper discussing Emily Dickinson and two poems from her Nature class. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) wrote well over 2,000 poems during her life in Amherst, Massachusetts but only seven were published while she was still alive. After her death, her poems were classified and published. Dickinson was heavily influenced by several factors in her life: the religion of her father, the impact of the Civil War, and nature. A look at two poems from her “Nature” class shows how Dickinson combines all of these symbolic elements to depict a time of loneliness, longing and false hope. Although the poems describe a time in nature when summer is just out of reach, the meanings run much deeper for Dickinson and her readers, as for her summer is a time of life, fruitfulness and happiness which has been lost. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • DOUBLE STANDARD BY ELLEN WATKINS HARPER

    This 3-page paper discusses how Ellen Watkins Harper's poem "The Double Standard" explores the relationship between the sexes during the 19th century.

  • Interpretation of 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot

    A 5 page essay that offer interpretation of Eliot's famous poem. The writer argues that Prufrock realizes that he has aged without ever really having lived and there is the suggestion at one point in the poem that he toys with the idea of asking a woman to marry him. He does not, however, do this because of his fear of rejection. As this suggests, Eliot's poem captures perfectly the psychic state of a shy, insecure person who feels trapped in a "hell" created by his social paralysis, which keeps him from ever doing anything, from ever really living, out of fear of looking foolish, as well as the fear of embarrassment that results from having tried and failed. As this suggests, examination of this poem shows how it is a psychological profile of a modern individual whose life is meaningless due to his internalization of what he feels is expected of him. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Dante’s Inferno & Humanism

    A 3 page essay that discusses “The Inferno” from Dante’s medieval epic poem The Divine Comedy. This poem describes the experience of the author, led by the specter of the ancient Roman poet Virgil, through a journey of spiritual enlightenment that takes him through Hell, Purgatory and finally to Heaven. The punishments that are inflicted on the souls in Hell strike Dante, as a character in the poem, as inhumane, but Dante, the poet, makes it clear that each punishment is ideally suited as retribution for the sins committed by these souls while the individuals were alive on earth. Therefore, as the poem’s narrator moves through Hell, he receives progressive lessons pertaining to what it means to be fully human and fully in accord with the expectations of God. No additional sources cited.

  • 2 Carpe Diem Poems

    A 4 page essay that explicates 2 carpe diem poems. Carpe diem, a Latin phrase meaning “cease the day,” is a favorite theme found in seventeenth century poetry. Two of the most famous carpe diem poems from this era are Robert Herrick’s “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” and Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress.” An examination of these poems indicates that while Herrick makes effective use of imagery in order to argue his carpe diem seduction theme, Marvell’s poem is the most effective. No additional sources cited.

  • A Poetic Analysis of 'Homecoming' by Lenrie Peters

    This is 4 page paper meant as an explication of Lenrie Peters’ poem “Homecoming”. Gambian poet and novelist Lenrie Peters was born in 1932 in Bathurst, the capital of Gambia during the time when Gambia was still a British colony. The background of Peters and that of his country is important when analyzing his poem “Homecoming” as readers can better understand the climate in which he left Gambia to become educated and that to which he returned many years later. The poem “Homecoming” is among his collection which shows the corruptive greed of the tribal leaders while at the same time is balanced by “nostalgia for a pastoral past with cautious assertion of hope for a future built on that past”. Peters’ “Homecoming” writes of the sadness and strange shadows and skeletons which awaited him when he returned to Gambia to which he had “longed for returning”. The poem can be analyzed through several meanings including literal, connoted, figurative, imagery, allusions and tone among others. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • War's Realities and Poetry

    This 4 page paper considers the similarities between two different poems; Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen and Patterns by Amy Lowell. Both of these poems depict the horror and haut caused by war, but are written form different –perspectives. The paper examines the meaning of the poems and the ways in which they present the impact that war can have at a personal level. Quotes from the poems are used to illustrate points raised. The bibliography cites 2 sources.

  • Advancing Age in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats

    A 5 page essay that summarizes and analyzes 3 poems by Yeats. In three of his best poems, William Butler Yeats addresses the age-old topic of mortality and the bitterness of advancing age. These poems are "Among School Children," "Sailing to Byzantium," and "Byzantium." These three poems thematically share and develop Yeats' thoughts relative to the loss of youth and the decline and decay of the human body contrasted against what is eternal in human experience, which is the medium of art and the striving of the soul toward perfection. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Sexual Imagery/Depression in 3 Poems By Robert Frost

    A 5 page essay that analyzes 3 poems by Frost. Robert Frost is one of America's best-loved poets. His use of evocative and lyrical natural imagery speaks to a broad audience. However, in addition to the folksy wisdom, there is tension in many of Frost's poems that subtly intimates both his battles with lifelong depression, as well as conflicted feelings toward sex. The following examination of 3 of Frost's poems, "Acquainted wit the Night," "The Road Not Taken," and "Birches," demonstrates that below the literal surface meaning of these poems, Frost invites the reader to look deeper into his perception. No additional sources cited.

  • Nature and Poetic Views Contrasted

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares four poems, --"A Sick Rose" by William Blake; "Apparently with no surprise" by Emily Dickinson; "Digging" by Seamus Heaney; and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" by Robert Frost. The writer argues that in these poems the reader encounters brilliant imagery that perfectly invokes scenes of nature in the reader's imagination. However, examination of these four poems shows that the poets intend their verse to send very different messages. Blake and Dickinson picture nature as beautiful, but unfeeling. Their poems see nature as evidence of a divine power that can be capricious in its cruelty. Frost and Heaney, on the other hand, picture nature as soothing, positive and more benign. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • 'Smile' in the Poetry of Robert Browning and Dorothy Parker

    A 3 page essay on the use of the world "smile" in 2 poems. Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess" and Dorothy Parker in "A Certain Lady" create poems that employ the word "smile." "Smile" in each poem refers to the standard meaning of the word, that is, a facial expression in which the corners of the mouth turn upward, indicating pleasure or amusement; however, this word is employed quite differently within the context of each poem. Browning's Duke Ferrara condemns his "last duchess" because she smiled too freely and too genuinely and did not keep her smiles as something belonging solely to him. Dorothy Parker's "certain lady" convinces her lover that her special smiles are only for him, but admits that they hide a duplicitous heart. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparison of the Poems by Christina Rossetti and John Milton

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares works by Milton and Rossetti. John Milton (1608-1674), in his epic poem Paradise Lost, and Christina Rossetti (1830-1894), in her poem The Goblin Market, each present narratives in which women are tempted by sin that is represented allegorically by fruit. In each poem, there are also depictions of acts of love. But while these features indicate that the poems bear similarities, they also have fundamental differences that deal mainly with the poet's depiction of women. Eve is depicted as shallow, easily deceived and not capable of thinking as rationally as Adam. Rossetti's heroine, Lizzie, on the other hand, is clever, self-sacrificing, and saves her sister from sin through her actions. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and Imagery

    A 5 page essay that discusses Andrew Marvell's seduction poem "To His Coy Mistress." In this poem, Marvell (1621-1678) employs striking use of imagery delineates both the pleasure involved in "ceasing the day" (carpe diem) and the shortness of time, which is the philosophy's rationale. The first half of the poem employs imagery to establish a sense of intimacy between Marvell and his lover. The second half employs time imagery to focus on the point that life is short. Collectively, this argument makes this one of English literature's most persuasive seduction poems. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Dialogue between the Soul and the Body' by Andrew Marvell

    A 3 page essay that explicates Marvell's poem "A Dialogue between the Soul and the Body." In this poem, Marvell addresses the duality of human nature. Examination of Marvell's thought on this topic shows that he considers the perspective of the soul and the body to be contradictory. No additional sources cited.

  • Analysis of the Poem 'The Elixir' by George Herbert

    A 3 page explication of the poem featured in the 1633 collection of religious poetry, “The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations.” No additional sources are used.

  • Maya Angelou/Phenomenal Woman

    A 4 page essay that offers an explication and analysis of this poem. Throughout the course of human history, men haven been primarily admired for their accomplishments, but the focus of admiration for women has been on whether or not their appearance fit with what a particular society considered beautiful. In her poem "Phenomenal Woman," Maya Angelou challenges this pervasive cultural feature and asserts that she is extraordinary and immensely attractive, without fitting within any of society's preconceived notions of how female beauty and attractiveness should be defined and conceptualized. No additional sources cited.

  • Lord Byron, We'll Go No More A-Roving

    A 5 page research paper/essay that analyzes this poem by George Gordon, Lord Byron. A close examination of this poem and where it fits in Byron's life suggests a negative view of Bryon, both as a poet and as an individual. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Explication of George Herbert's "Virtue"

    A 4 page explication that describes George Herbert's early seventeenth century poem "Vertue" (Virtue). The writer explains how the main point of the poem is the immortality of the virtuous soul. No additional sources cited.

  • The Warrior Culture of Beowulf

    This 5 page research paper examines the Old English epic poem of Beowulf in terms of what the poem conveys about the warrior culture of the Germanic tribes that were the forebears of the English. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Parliament of Fowles' by Geoffrey Chaucer

    A 5 page paper that discusses the structure and thematic content of Geoffrey Chaucer's poem "Parliament of Fowles," which is one of the first Valentine's poems. The writer argues that Chaucer upholds love, but stresses that love should promote the "common profit," i.e. the common good. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Langston Hughes, An Overview

    A 5 page essay that offers background on the biography of Langston Hughes and then discussion of five of his poems: "Bad Man," "Cross," "Let American be America Again," "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" and "Silhouette." Bibliography lists these poems and 2 additional sources.

  • Imagery in Ulysses by James Joyce

    A 5 page essay on James Joyce's use of language and imagery in his novel Ulysses. This novel loosely (very loosely) follows the episodes created by Homer in his epic poem The Odyssey. The writer analyzes three chapters from Joyce's Ulysses and argues that, as far as language use is considered, it is similar to a prose poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Emily Dickinson's Views of Self and Society

    A 5 page essay that examines three of Dickinson's poems that deal with the self, how Dickinson saw herself and her society, "I'm Nobody! Who are You?," "Much Madness is divinest Sense," "The Soul selects her own Society." The writer argues that these poems give the reader insight into the remarkable personality of this nineteenth century poet. No additional sources cited.

  • Christian Allegory and 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

    A 5 page research paper, in which the writer argues that the traditional interpretation of "Mariner," which sees the poem as Christian allegory, comes closest to capturing its meaning. The writer also explores how the poem has been interpreted by various critics. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • A Reading of Emily Dickinson's 'After Great Pain…'

    A 5 page essay that offers an explication of Dickinson's poem "After Great Pain a Formal Feeling Comes." The writer argues that, in this poem, Dickinson indicates the various stages of recovery from traumatic pain. Her verse delineates the various stages that an individual goes through after experiencing great pain: the philosophical questions that one asks; the mechanical feeling of detachment; and, also, that the pain eventually ceases, if one survives it. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Coole Park and Ballylee, 1931' by William Butler Yeats

    A 5 page essay that examines Yeats' assertion in this poem that 'We were the last romantics…' (line 41). The writer argues that this is a fair assessment and that examining the context of the poem demonstrates Yeat's version of romanticism, which is embedded in his love of the Irish country. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Homer's 'The Iliad' and 'The Odyssey'

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Homer's famous epic poems. The themes of the poems are discussed as well as what type of audience Homer might have written each piece for. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Comparison of Poems by Keats and Blake

    A 3 page essay that compares "La Belle Dame sans Merci" by John Keats with William Blake's "The Divine Image." The writer first addresses their similarities by showing how both poems reflect the characteristics of Romantic poetry, but then differences are addressed by outlining the themes of each poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • 'The Children's Hour' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    A 5 page research paper that critically analyzes Longfellow's poem "The Children's Hour." The writer argues that this poem speaks directly to feelings that are basic to all humanity and this is why his verse, although no longer critically acclaimed, is so well loved and read throughout the world. The writer also discusses Longfellow's reputation and how his work is regarded. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Science According to the Poems of Walt Whitman and Edgar Allan Poe

    A 4 page essay that compares and contrasts 2 poems by Poe and Whitman. Poe's "Sonnet--To Science" and Whitman's "When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer," address not only the same subject matter, but also they take an identical stand on the topic. While Poe's poem is the most overt in its message, Whitman also takes the stand that science, specifically astronomy, attempts to drain the beauty and mystery from life and turns the wondrous into the mundane. No additional sources cited.

  • 'My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that discusses Emily Dickinson's poem number 754, "My Life has stood--a Loaded Gun," in which Dickinson represents herself and her life, metaphorically, as a loaded weapon, a phallic symbol that is associated with masculinity. The imagery, and the energy, that pervades the poem indicates Dickinson's deeply seated conflicted feelings concerning traditional concepts of masculinity and femininity and the symbolism she employs expresses her inner rage at the restricted nature of gender that was prevalent in Victorian society. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Poetic Portrayals of Icarus's Fall

    A 4 page review of the poems “Musee des Beaux” by W.H. Auden, “Landscape With the Fall of Icarus” by W. C. Williams, and “Waiting for Icarus” by Muriel Rukeyser. Interestingly the first two of these poems were inspired by the painting “Fall of Icarus” by Peter Breughel. The author of this paper describes the details of this painting and contrasts the styles of these three poets. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Richard Wilbur's Poem 'Love Calls Us to the Things of This World'

    An Explanation of the Poem by Richard Wilbur A 3 page discussion of Wilbur’s poem. The author of this paper provides a detailed discussion of the poet’s choice of words and discusses how this choice serves as a contrast between the spiritual and the earthly aspects of human existence. No additional sources are listed.

  • 'Ovid's Banquet of Sence' by George Chapman

    A 3 page essay that examines Chapman's sixteenth century poem "Ovid's Banquet of Sence." The writer discusses how Chapman assumed that his readers would be cognizant of numerous literary references and focuses on how Chapman's poem reflects Platonic ideals expressed by Diotima in Plato's Symposium. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • A Summary of The Song of Roland (Chanson de Roland)

    This 5 page report discusses the medieval poem 'The Song of Roland' or Chanson de Roland and summarizes the plot, describes the poem's characters and their roles, and briefly discusses the 'ideal' behavior of a knight, as well as chivalry in the middle ages of Europe. No additional sources cited.

  • History and 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page analytical essay that examines Homer's Iliad in terms of how the details of the poem reflect the culture and beliefs of Homer's era. The writer argues that the works of Homer, regardless of whether or not Homer actually existed or if his account of the Trojan War is historical accurate, definitely reflect the cultural concepts, beliefs, and worldview of the time in which these epic poems were composed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Placing a Historical Value on 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page paper which analyzes the epic poem from a historical context, considering if the events depicted are real, if the information can be verified, and examines the author’s intentions for writing the poem. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Dido's Character in 'The Aeneid' by Virgil

    A 5 page paper that reviews book four of Virgil's Aenead. This paper discusses Aeneas' duty, Dido's romantic passion, and the reason why this couple suffers such a tragic end. Also considered in this poem is the affect of Catullus' poem 64, and a comparison is made between the story of Ariadne and Theseus and Dido and Aeneas. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Beauty and Friendship in 3 of Sappho's Poems

    A 5 page research paper/essay that offer analysis of three of Sappho's poems. The writer argues that while her verse is notorious for its connection with Lesbianism, there is much more to Sappho's poetry than mere eroticism. An examination of her poems reveals a deep and passionate connection with nature and appreciation for beauty, which are sentiments that reach across time and space and speak to the modern reader, establishing a feeling of connection and friendship. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Epic 'Beowulf' and Anglo Saxon Culture

    This 5 page paper discusses aspects of the Anglo-Saxon culture as evidenced by the classic poem, Beowulf. Discussion includes aspects of culture, government, family ties, and religion. Citations given from text and quoted. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Human Nature and the Poetry of Walt Whitman

    This 5 page paper examines the life of Walt Whitman and how he perceive human nature and the meaning of life. Excerpts from his poems, "O Captain! My Captain!" and "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" are examined as supporting evidence. Bilbiography lists 3 sources.

  • Truth in Poetry

    A 5 page paper which examines three different things. The paper discusses the phrase “The truth shall set you free” as it relates to specific literature. The paper then discusses the meaning of William Blake’s comment “Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks of Religion,” and lastly the paper discusses a particular poem whose title and author is unknown. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • American Society in Three Literary Views

    A 7 page essay that contrasts and compares three works: Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall," Mark Twain's "Corn-Pone Opinions," and Countee Cullen's poem "Incident." The writer argues that in each case, the author endeavors to reflect to the American people certain aspects of society that are contradictory to the prejudices that were evident during the time when these works were created. In other words, these works reflect aspects of the society in which they were created and, in doing so, provide a critique of that society. No additional sources cited.

  • Augustus' Rule and the Pessimism of 'The Aeneid'

    A 5 page contention that despite the fact that Virgil manages to maintain a facade of patriotism in "The Aeneid", the poem is in reality an underhandedly pessimistic account of Augustus' regime. This is true despite the fact that Virgil was writing under the close supervision of Augustus and was obligated to portray him and his regime in a positive light. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Gwen Harwood's 'Suburban Sonnet'

    A 5 page paper that examines the language and meaning of Australian lyric poet Gwen Harwood's Suburban Sonnet. Discussed is the poem's use of imagery and metaphor as well as the dual meanings expressed by these literary devices. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Beowulf & Odysseus/Ancient Heroes

    A 6 page essay that contrasts and compares Beowulf and Odysseus. The sagas of these two heroes seem similar at first glance because the ancient epic poems that record their exploits both deal with heroic action, battles against monsters and similar feats of daring-do. However, a closer look at both the Beowulf poem and Homer's Odyssey shows that these tales are each products of the culture that produced them. Therefore, they reflect different cultures, different eras, and different beliefs about what it means to be a hero. No additional sources cited.

  • Anne Bradsreet/In Reference to Her Children, 23 June 1659

    A 3 page explication of this poem by Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), America's first published poet, who wrote her verse while raising eight children, and performing all of the wifely duties expected of Puritan wife in colonial New England (Anne Bradstreet). While Bradstreet stepped somewhat outside the societal sphere of hearth and home, which was the accepted realm of women, by writing verse, her verse underscored her understanding of the domestic role, and therefore, did not offend Puritan society. Her poem "In Reference to her Children, 23 June 1659" expresses a mother's pride at the accomplishments of her children, as well as mother's fears at having her little ones leave the "nest" and fly away on their own. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Old Age Poetic Portrayals in the Works of Jenny Joseph and Ursula Fanthorpe

    A 5 page contrast of the realities of old age and the plans we often make for our golden years in the throws of the optimism of youth. The author reviews the basic premises of these two poems, one planning outrageous behavior and excesses for her old age and the other bound by his worn out body and mind, to conclude that these two poems are as different as reality and fantasy. As disturbing as it may be to authors like Jenny Joseph, old age is not always a thing which we can plan for. In comparison, “Old Man, Old Man” by Ursula Fanthorpe is a more realistic portrayal of the way that the circumstances of old age, despite all your plans to the contrary, can catch up with you. No additional sources are listed.

  • Robert Frost/The Road Not Taken

    A 4 page essay that analyzes Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken.” There are crucial decisions in life that influence the nature that the person’s life takes from that moment onward. For a Christian, one such decision is when the individual decides to accept the gift of Salvation and follow Christ. This crucial decision sets the path or course for the person’s life. Robert Frost beautifully dramatizes the significance of this type of momentous decision in his poem “The Road Not Taken.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Assisi' by Norman MacCaig Analyzed

    This 7 page report discusses one poem by the Scottish poet, Norman MacCaig (1910-1996). MacCaig has been hailed as one of Scotland’s greatest poets. Balance is always a key point in MacCaig’s poetry, whether it is the balance between light and dark, man and nature, or man with other men. His skills of observation were also often directed toward the nature of identity and how one individual perceives him/herself and others. Such is the case with MacCaig’s poem “Assisi” that was published in his collection titled “Surroundings” in 1966. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Gender in Beowulf

    A 3 page essay that discusses the role of women and gender in Beowulf, the Old English epic, is reflective the culture of Germanic tribes that invaded England during the early middle ages. A close examination of this poem shows that gender and women play a distinctive role in this tale of heroism. While Beowulf's focus is on the warrior ethos and what this entails, there is also the fact that the poem implies fear of female power, along with an overarching societal need to keep women in a properly subjugated role. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'This World is not Conclusion' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page paper analyzing Emily Dickinson’s Poem 501. Dickinson makes her point in the first line of the poem, and provides the remainder of it in support of her opening statement. Her message is that despite the efforts of people to explain God, ignore God, “serve” God or define God, He operates in a manner that defies human logic and focuses on the individual. If the individual is able to avoid awareness of God, He is at work nonetheless, nibbling away at the soul, making His presence sensed, at least, if not fully known without first gaining commitment of belief. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Browning's Last Duchess & Her Fatal Misstep

    A 3 page essay that discusses Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess" and how this applies to the concept of "hamarita." The literary term "hamarita" has been defined simply as a "tragic flaw," however, it does not necessarily refer to flaw in character, as it can also be an "unwitting, even a necessary, misstep in doing rather than an error in character" (Literary Vocabulary). In Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess," it is made clear that the duke's last duchess did, indeed, take a fatal misstep that brought about her demise and that action consisted, not in a character defect, but in the fact that she was too good, too caring, too human, to be a proper aristocrat in the eyes of her husband. Her hamarita lay in her love of life and individuality, which prevented her from existing solely as just one more beautiful possession belong to the duke. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Dante’s Inferno/Canto XX

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Canto XX from Dante Alighieri’s epic poem “The Divine Comedy,” which begins with the book entitled “Inferno” and records how Dante journeys through Hell led by the specter of the ancient Roman poet Virgil. In Canto XX, Dante, the poet as opposed to the character in the poem, reasons that piety lives but that pity is dead. This may seem hard-hearted to the modern-day reader, but it fits with the theological reasoning of Dante’s era, which believed that God’s justice should be accepted unequivocally and with complete faith, that is, with piety. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Early Snow' by Mary Oliver

    A 3 page essay that discusses the imagery in Mary Oliver's poem "Early Snow." The writer states that this is a lyrical description of an early snow fall. Examination of this poem shows that, first of all, the poet concentrates on how the snow looks as it covers familiar objects in the landscape. Then, the poet goes on to internally explore the sense of awe and amazement that she feels watching the snow. These musings lead her to consider humanity's place in the scheme of things, as represented by the natural world. No additional sources cited.

  • Time Perceptions in Poetry

    A 4 page explication of four poems dealing with the passage of time: "Sonnet 18"/Shakespare, "Sonnet 75"/Spencer, "The Soote Season"/Howard, and "My Galley"/Wyatt, the Elder. The writer argues that human beings are the only creatures aware of their morality and that this has influenced artistic expression since the dawn of history. This examination of four sixteenth and seventeenth century poets demonstrates that while the topic is universal, the artistic slant of individuals can vary considerably, as the tone of these poems ranges from the morose to the hopeful. No additional sources cited.

  • Federico Garcia Lorca/Play Trilogy

    A 3 page research paper/essay that discusses the Federico Garcia Lorca’s play trilogy. The editors of the New England Review add a biographical note to their publication of Federico Garcia Lorca’s poem “Siguiriya’s Way,” which identifies Lorca as one of the greatest poets and dramatists of modern Spain (Lorca, 2005, p. 96). This poem mixes sensuality with the ever-present threat of violence, which is as theme that is prominent in Lorca’s work. Three of Lorca’s best-known plays are his trilogy: “Blood Wedding,” “Yerma,” and “The House of Bernarda Alba.” Examination of these plays demonstrates how Lorca uses the elements of melodrama to represent the presence of overwhelming sexual desire within the context of the negotiated power. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Sylvia Plath, Mirror & Metaphors

    A 5 page research paper/essay that discusses 2 poems by Sylvia Plath, who was born in 1932 to Aurelia and Otto Plath in Boston, Massachusetts and died in 1963 by her own hand, committing suicide just a few months after her thirtieth birthday (Inness 10-13). Talented, young, beautiful, with two small children—despite the depression caused a separation from her husband--Plath’s suicide remains an enigma that critics draw upon when facing the task of deciphering the meaning of her poetry and her life. Looking specifically at two of her poems, “Metaphors,” which is dated March 20, 1959 and “Mirror,” which is dated October 23, 1961, it is possible to discern something of the disintegration of Plath’s mindset between writing these two works. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Greek Values in Homer's 'The Iliad'

    A 4 page essay that examines Greek values in the Iliad. In his epic poems, the Iliad and the Odyssey, the ancient Greek poet Homer praised numerous qualities and values. "Patriotism, heroism, loyalty, resistance to temptations, truthfulness, generosity, honesty and hospitality" are just a few of the virtues that "Homer praised and exalted" (Christian and Greek philosophy, 2003, p. 15). This examination of Homer's Iliad focuses on what this epic poem tells the modern reader concerning the importance of Greek values, specifically heroism, honor and solidarity, in Greek society. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift' by Jonathan Swift

    A 4 page essay that analyzes Jonathan Swift's poetic commentary on his own death. Swift (1667-1745) is one of the greatest satirists of all time. His wit and critical viewpoint of society did not exclude himself as a topic. In his poem "Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift," he addresses how he imagines his own decline, death and the response of his so-called friends and public. The underlying theme in this poem is that profuse shows of concern and compassion serve to cover the basic self-interest of the individual, who is enormously glad that the sufferer is not himself. Likewise, Swift lampoons his own reactions to the success of others. Examination of this work shows how Swift uses the symbol of pride to point out the follies inherent in human behavior. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Canto 3 of 'Inferno' by Dante

    An 8 page research paper that analyzes Canto III from Dante's Inferno (which is a part of his epic masterpiece the Divine Comedy). This examination uses a representative portion of the Inferno, namely Canto III, to illustrate how Dante used the framework of the poem to convey his ideas concerning religion and morality. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Depictions of Nature in the Poetry of Dickinson and Frost

    A 3 page essay that contrasts and compares 2 poems. Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost are both evocative poets whose verse shows each poet's gift for reflecting natural scenes with photographic accuracy, conveying to the reader not only how the scene looked, but also what it made the poet feel and the thoughts it conjured. Two representative poems, "The Wind begun to knead the Grass" by Dickinson and "Design" by Frost, demonstrate the marked similarities between the ways in which these two great American poets utilized diction and poetic imagery in their work and also how they differed. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Julia's Petticoat by Herrick

    A 3 page explication of "Julia's Petticoat," by seventeenth century poet Robert Herrick. The writer argues that Herrick creates a seduction poem that uses the extended metaphor of his love's petticoat as an elaborate and poetically lyrical way of referring to the sexual allure of the woman who wears it. Examination of the poem shows that Herrick focuses on the effect that this undergarment has on the poet as he finds it suggestive of the woman's beauty and allure, so much so that the occasional glimpse of petticoat seems to excite him as much as the woman herself. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Weary Blues' by Langston Hughes

    A 5 page research paper that examines Hughes' poem "The Weary Blues. The writer argues that Hughes attempted to convey an understanding of blues values through his verse to the wider modern world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Interpreting 'Sailing to Byzantium' by William Butler Yeats

    A 6 page review of one of Yeats’ most spiritually moving poem. The author analyzes the symbolism employed by Yeats to present the contention that Yeats’ intent was to impart a sense of spiritual awareness, of the fragility of life in our worldly form, of the power of the many mystical forces of our universe, and the concepts of reincarnation and life in the afterworld. Bibliography lists 4 sources. PPyeats2.rtf

  • Ancient Writings Like Epic of Gilgamesh and Ideology

    This 6 page paper looks at the Epic of Gilgamesh along with four ancient poems. These are compared and contrasted and similar themes are highlighted. There is a great deal of attention to religion and philosophy. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'The Odyssey' by Homer Content Analysis

    A 5 page paper which examines the Robert Fagles’ translation of the classic Greek poem to consider why Odysseus did not immediately return to Ithaca, the reasons behind his lengthy hiatus, contemplates what he is searching for and determines whether or not the text can be read as a metaphor for the Ionian exile. No additional sources are used.

  • 'Black Magic' by Dudley Randall

    A 3 page essay that explicates "Black Magic" by Dudley Randall, which is also known by the title "Blackberry Sweet." The writer argues that this homage to the beauty of a young black woman is in the tradition of English seduction poems. No additional source cited.

  • "Political, Philosophical, Religious, Cultural, Social, Literary and Artistic Value of 'Poem of The Cid"

    4 pages in length. The philosophical, political, social, religious, cultural, literary and artistic values present in Poem of the Cid reflect the comprehensive nature medieval literature sought to project; that this tale is replete with detailed implications of each value speaks to the manner by which medieval literature served as a definitive – if not embellished – form of social statement. No additional sources cited.

  • 3 Women in Odysseus's Life in 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 4 page paper which examines the roles of these women in Odysseus’s life and how they affect the protagonist as well as the epic poem, “The Odyssey.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Symbols Used in Poetry and in the Bible

    A 6 page essay that explores the meaning of symbol in 4 works: Matthew 13:24-30; "The Boston Evening Transcript" by T.S. Eliot; "The Lightning is a Yellow Fork" by Emily Dickinson and "The Road Less Traveled" by Robert Frost. The writer offers some biographical facts on each author; then discusses the meaning of the poem and then how it uses symbols to convey that meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Homer's 'The Iliad' and Achilles' Shield

    A 3 page essay that discusses the moving images on the shield of Achilles, which is wrought before the final battle with Hector. The writer contrasts the story told by these images with the plot of the poem and speculates about their purposes within the overall structure of Homer's epic. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'War is Kind' and 'A Mystery of Heroism' by Stephen Crane

    A 4 page paper which examines Stephen Crane’s short story “A Mystery of Heroism” and his poem “War is Kind,” and discusses Crane’s apparent attitude towards war. No additional sources cited.

  • How Baumer and Kantorek in All Quiet On The Western FrontWould Respond to the poem The Next War by Robert Graves

    4 pages in length. The writer briefly discusses how Baumer and Kantorek would respond to Robert Graves' poem "The Next War." Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Edgar Allan Poe's Poetry and Death

    A 6 page paper which examines how the deaths of people close to him influenced Poe’s poems. Specifically considered are “Alone,” Annabel Lee,” “The Raven,” “To My Mother,” and “Ulalume.” Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Nature Imagery in the Works of Zora Neale Hurston and William Wordsworth

    A 3 page paper which discusses the nature imagery as presented in Wordsworth's poem "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" and Nora Zeale Hurston's novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God." Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Analyzing Poet Elizabeth Bishop’s “One Art”

    In six pages this paper presents an analysis and criticism of Elizabeth Bishop’s famous poem, “One Art.” Four sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Epic Hero Status of Odysseus in Homer’s “The Odyssey”

    In seven pages this paper analyzes Odysseus’ status as an epic hero as depicted by Homer in his classical poem, “The Odyssey.” A comparison is also made with the epic hero status of King Gilgamesh in the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. There are no additional sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Fame, Fate and Destiny in “Beowulf”

    In four pages this paper examines the roles that fame, fate, and destiny play in the anonymous Germanic epic poem “Beowulf.” Three sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • John Keats and Ernest Hemingway

    A 3 page paper which compares and contrasts the love seen in John Keats’ poem “La Belle Dame sans Merci” and Ernest Hemingway’s short story “A Very Short Story.” No additional sources cited.

  • Children’s Perceptions of Adults

    A 3 page paper which examines Robert Hayden’s poem Those Winter Sundays and Constance Squires’ short story Running Out of Music as they relate to children’s perceptions of adults. No additional sources cited.

  • Analysis of Beowulf

    In six pages this paper examines the anonymously written Medieval epic in an analysis that includes the poem’s meaning; its prevalent themes; how these themes relate to the characters, to the writer, and to society; the association (or lack thereof) to Christianity and Paganism; and considers what Beowulf, Odysseus, and Jesus Christ might have in common in anything. There are no other sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Poetic Explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose”

    In three pages, this poetic explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose” includes basic information on the poet and the poem, identifies the speaker, subject, and ideal, and also considers the poetic devices of imagery, simile, and metaphor. Two sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Ezra Pound, "A Virginal"

    A 3 page explication of Ezra Pound's poem "A Virginal" that begins with roughly a page covering the poet's biography and background. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Epic “Beowulf”

    The Epic “Beowulf”: In three pages this paper discusses the major epic characteristics featured in the classic anonymously written Medieval classic poem “Beowulf.” Three sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Marvell/To His Coy Mistress

    A 3 page essay that explicates this poem by Andrew Marvell, the seventeenth century British poet, in which Marvell makes a carpe diem argument that his mistress should throw caution to the wind and surrender her virginity because life is short and they will grow old and die within a heart beat. No additional sources cited.

  • European Difficulties to Transform from Pagan to Christian in the Poems "Song of Roland" and "Beowulf"

    In four pages this paper examines these anonymously written German and French poems to analyze the struggles Europe underwent to transform itself from a pagan to a Christian culture during the Middle Ages. Three sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • 'Patterns' of Life and in the Poem by Amy Lowell

    In three pages this paper analyzes the poem’s language, rhyme, meaning, images, and symbolism. There are no additional sources listed in the bibliography.

  • The Happy Fault in Paradise Lost

    This 3 page paper discusses the “happy fault” in Paradise Lost, and how it relates to Milton’s purpose in writing the poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Female Characters and Ancient Texts

    In four pages (and subdivided into Parts I and II, an analysis of ancient text passages (Plato’s Symposium and Phaedo, The Life of St. Pelagia the Harlot, Selected Poems by Constantine Cafavy, Daniel 12:1, and Virgil’s Georgics), and of female characters Diotima, Judith, and St. Mary the Harlot, and an examination of narrative similarities between Virgil’s Georgics (Book IV) and Book IV of Homer’s “The Odyssey” are presented. Five sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • The Aeneid: An Examination of Books 1, 4, and 6

    In three pages this paper examines how negatively Aeneas’ abandonment of Dido reflects on his character and whether “The Aeneid” is a political poem or an example of propaganda. No other sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Eighteenth Century Analysis of Poems "Little Black Boy" by William Blake, "Holy Willie's Prayer" by Robert Burns, and "We Are Seven" by William Wordsworth

    In four pages this paper contrasts and compares the style and poetry of each of these eighteenth century British poems. Three sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Lacking Conviction in Sexual Intimacy in "Sex without Love" by Sharon Olds and "Lust" by Susan Minot

    In three pages this explication examines the theme of intimacy without conviction in Susan Minot’s short story and in Sharon Olds’ poem. There are no additional sources listed in the bibliography.

  • This 6-page paper examines an element of literature by using two poems and short story by John Milton (When I Consider How my Light is Spent), Robert Frost (The Road not Taken) and Sherman Alexie (Indian Education). There are 3 sources cited.

  • Dante, the Inferno, and the Question of Gender

    This 4 page paper discusses the way Dante treats gender in his poem, The Divine Comedy. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Poem by Frost

    This 3 page paper provides an overview of one poem by Robert Frost, with a particular look at form, language, content, and other dimensions found to be engaging. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • "Lanval" - Subversion of Gender Norms in Arthurian Legend

    This is a 4 page paper that provides an overview of Marie de France's "Lanval". The poem is analyzed in terms of Lanval's foreignness being representative of his subversive masculinity. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Countee Cullen's 'Heritage' and African American Ancestry Perceptions

    A 5 page paper that examines early twentieth-century poet Countee Cullen's perception of his African-American ancestry as expressed in his poem "Heritage". Discussed are the conflicts and contradictions Cullen found in this perception and the factors and emotions that contributed to these conflicts. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Mending Wall by Robert Frost

    A 4 page essay that explicates "Mending Wall," a poem by Robert Frost. The writer argues that Frost envisions the task of mending the wall between himself and his neighbor as an extended metaphor that protests the blind acceptance of ideas. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock/Eliot

    A 3 page essay that offers explication of T.S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock." The writer discusses how love and romance are envisioned in the poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Langston Hughes' Blues Poetry

    In five pages this paper examines the interplay between rhythm, metaphor, and imagery in five of Langston’s blues poems: “The Weary Blues,” “Young Gal’s Blues,” “Dream Boogie,” “Listen Here Blues,” and “Ballad of the Landlord.” Six sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • The World is Too Much with Us/William Wordsworth

    A 3 page explication of William Wordsworth's poem "The World is Too Much With Us," which focuses on Wordsworth's use of imagery and metaphor. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • "The last Night that She Lived:" An Analysis of Comprehending Death According to Emily Dickinson

    In three pages this paper summarizes and analyzes Emily Dickinson’s poem, “The last Night that She lived.” The bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Philosophy of Negative Capability in the Poems of John Keats

    In four pages this paper examines how Keats used technique to employ his philosophy of negative capability in some of his most famous poems. Two sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge by Rainer Maria Rilke

    (5 pp) Author Rainer Maria Rile claims that the "degeneration of things leads to the martyrdom of the individual." This statement will be examined, in the context of his prose worth The Notebooks of Malte Laaruids Brigge (1910), and the poem Grodek by Georg Trakl.

  • Analyzing 'We Wear the Mask' and 'Accountability' by Paul Laurence Dunbar

    A 5 page paper analysis of the tone, style and subject matter of two seemingly dissimilar poems. No additional sources are used.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Battle of Frogs and Mice'

    This 5 page paper discusses the poem "The Battle of Frogs and Mice" and what it might mean for our age. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Simple Eloquence of 'I Wandered Lonely As a Cloud' by William Wordsworth

    A 3 page explication of Wordsworth's poem "I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud," which is a simple, but eloquent, depiction of nature that emphasizes how a moment of natural beauty can bring solace and pleasure when remembered. Wordsworth describes a rather ordinary occurrence, which is seeing a field of daffodils blowing in the wind. Yet, his artistry serves to use the very commonality of this experience to help the reader see a connection between humanity and the natural world. No additional sources cited.

  • 'The Odyssey' by Homer and Characters Penelope and Athena

    A 5 page paper which examines how the wife and the goddess influenced Odysseus, thus assuring their importance in the epic poem. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • E.M. Forster's Novel A Passage to India and Walt Whitman's Poem 'Passage to India' Analyzed

    A 5 page paper which examines how Forster’s novel reacts to the assertions in Whitman’s poem. No additional sources are used.

  • Comparing Wordsworth's 'Ode Intimations of Mortality' to Keats' 'Ode to a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page comparison of the literary genre of odes using the poems of two of the most noted poets of the romantic genre. Discusses the ode genre, distinguishing between irregular odes and regular odes. Emphasizes that while certain aspects such as structure differ in many respects between Wordsworth’s “Ode” and Keats’ “The Grecian Urn”, there are a number of commonalties between these presentations as well. No additional sources are listed.

  • Carpe Diem Poems by Herrick and Donne

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares Herrick's poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" and Donne's "The Flea." The writer argues that both poets make use of the carpe diem them to create seduction arguments. No additional sources cited.

  • 'In Memoriam' by Alfred Lord Tennyson and its 'Spring Songs'

    This 4 page report discusses the “spring songs” of the poem’s sections 38, 83, 91 and 115. In each, Tennyson discusses the return of spring, the possibility of rebirth, and a measure of hope and reassurance. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • 'Song' by Allen Ginsberg, 'Story of an Hour' by Kate Chopin, and Love

    A 5 page paper which examines love in the short story “Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin. The idea of love is discussed in relationship to the poem “Song” by Allen Ginsberg. No additional sources cited.

  • Geoffrey Chaucer's 'The House of Fame' and its Dream Sequence

    This 5 page report discusses Geoffrey Chaucer’s poem “The House of Fame” and its dream sequence. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Literary and Poetic Examples of True Love

    A 5 page paper which examines what true love is as described by literature and poetry. The paper discusses Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116,” Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “How Do I Love Thee?,” Bernard Malamud’s “The Magic Barrel,” Judith Viorst’s “True Love,” and Linda Pastan’s “Love Poem.” No additional sources cited.

  • Analyzing Sylvia Plath's Poetic Voice

    This 5 page paper discusses the importance of voice in the poetry of Sylvia Plath and draws on examples from three notable works: "Daddy", "Lady Lazarus", and "Metaphors". This paper gives many quotes as examples and offers in-depth insight into why voice is so important in these poems. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five and Yon Yonson's Cyclic Poem

    A 6 page paper which examines how the Yon Yonson poem in Kurt Vonnegut’s novel “Slaughterhouse Five” essentially reflects the narrative and structural form of the story. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • The Theme of Identity in Derek Walcott's Omeros

    This 8 page paper discusses the theme of identity in the epic poem by Derek Walcott, called Omeros. The characters of Achille and Plunkett are analyzed to show a search and discovery of self identity in the wake of two disparate cultures on St. Lucia. Many quotes and examples included and cited from text. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Omeros by Derek Walcott and Character Identity

    A 9 page paper which examines the characters of Achille, Hector, Helen, Ma Kilman, and Plunkett as symbolic figures who represent Walcott’s search for identity in his novel/epic poem “Omeros.” No additional sources cited.

  • 'Yvain' by Chretien de Troyes and Relationship Reciprocity

    A 5 page essay that analyzes the reciprocity of relationships in Chretien de Troyes' twelfth century epic poem Yvain, the Knight of the Lion. The writer argues that the message that these relationships transmit to the reader is that that give and take is necessary to the maintenance of society in general. No additional sources cited.

  • 'First Follow Nature and 'An Essay on Criticism' by Alexander Pope

    This 4 page report discusses a section of Pope’s An Essay on Criticism (published in 1711) that is often thought of as a poem in itself and referred to as “First Follow Nature” (lines 68 through 87). Also addressed is the importance and meaning of nature in 18th century English poetry and thinking. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • First World War and its Psychological Impact

    This 4 page paper examines two works. One is a book entitled Regeneration and the other is a poem entitled How to Die. Each examines the difficulties to emanate from World War One. No additional sources cited.

  • Culture in Alberto Rios's Nani and Marilyn Chin's Turtle Soup

    This is a 4 page paper which examines how cultural heritage is depicted in the poems Turtle Soup by Marilyn Chin and Nani by Alberto Rios. The bibliography has 2 sources.

  • Epic Poem Beowulf Contemporary Retelling

    A 7 page paper which retells the epic poem in order to be more easily understood by contemporary readers. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Life and Works of Emma Lazarus

    A 5 page essay on the poetry of Emma Lazarus (1849-1887) who is the most prominent Jewish American poet of the nineteenth century. Through her eloquent poetry and other literary work, she endeavored to express what it meant to be outside the mainstream of American society, to give a voice to the thousands of immigrants who were trying to integrate themselves into American society during the nineteenth century. The writer discusses 3 of Lazarus' poems. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Love Poetically Approached by John Donne

    A 10 page paper which examines how Donne represents love in his poems, divine works and sonnets. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Analysis of Poems by Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and Carl Sandburg

    This is a 3 page paper which answers specific questions concerning three poems - Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening by Robert Frost, They Will Say by Carl Sandburg, Life by Emily Dickinson and Time and Eternity by Emily Dickson. There is no bibliography.

  • 'The Odyssey' by Homer and Sports

    A 6 page paper which examines why sports is important to the poem, and the role it played in defining the characters and their actions. No additional sources are used.

  • Journeys and Their Philosophical Meaning in 'Inferno' by Dante Alighieri and 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 5 page paper which examines the role of philosophy in the similar journeys taken in each of these epic poems. No additional sources are used.

  • Status and Role of Women in 'The Iliad' and 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 9 page paper which examines the role and status of women in these classic epic poems of ancient Greece. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'Fragment 93' by Sappho

    A 3 page research paper that examines Sappho's poem fragment 93. Sappho was innovative in directing the "new wave" of Greek lyrists to move from writing poetry that from the perspective of the gods and muses toward using the personal perspective of the individual. The writer argues that fragment 93 exemplifies her style. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Friendship in Three Poems by Sappho

    A 5 page research paper/essay that analyzes three poems by the ancient Greek poet Sappho. The writer argues that Sappho's love of beauty comes across to the reader, establishing a bond of friendship -- a feeling of connection -- between the reader and the poet that transcends the millennia. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'The Bait' by John Donne

    A 3 page analysis of this English poem. “The Bait” is a love story, a tale of two wayward souls which are briefly pulled together by a man’s infatuation with a woman. Interwoven in “The Bait”, however is a unique blend of tangible reality and metaphysical abstraction. This paper examines the metaphysics and symbology employed by the poet. No additional sources are listed.

  • Robert Lowell and Bob Dylan

    An 8 page research paper that contrasts and compares Bob Dylan's song "Like a Rolling Stone" and Robert Lowell's poem "Memories of West Street and Lepke." The writer argues that Dylan and Lowell, having established themselves in a particular genre of their craft, changed the course of their careers by taking a different artistic path, much to the surprise of their critics and audiences. Lowell moved from the modernist camp to the postmodern and Dylan moved from folk music to rock n roll. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • William Wordsworth and Geoffrey Chaucer

    An 8 page paper which discusses Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” and William Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Christian Dogma in Beowulf

    A 5 page essay that draws on the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf to argue that a close examination of the poem suggests that the Christian poet that set the tale of Beowulf to paper for the first time saw in this Germanic folklore the outlines of Christian dogma, with the consequent result that Beowulf fits the broadest parameters of a Christ-like figure, yet with undeniable pagan elements. No additional sources cited.

  • 'The Battle of Frogs and Mice' An Ancient Greek Poetic Analysis

    A 3 page paper which examines the society and situation at the time as it is symbolically represented in the story, and specifically considers why the poem was written, who was meant to read it, the moral, and if it can be compared to any aspects of modern life. No additional sources are used.

  • Maya Angelou/Caged Bird

    A 4 page essay that discusses aspects of Angelou's autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. The first section of this report discusses the significance of this title, which is taken from a poem by Paul Dunbar. The second half offers a detailed description of Angelou's family tree, drawing description of each member of her family from the text. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Suicide and the Symbolism in William Shakespeare's Hamlet

    This 5 page paper gives a brief synopsis of the play Hamlet by Shakespeare. Analyzed is the role of Ophelia and the symbolism of her character. Examples, citations and quotes offered. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Secret History by Donna Tartt and Henry's Suicide

    This 5 page paper examins whether or not Henry's suicide was a noble gesture, or not. This paper excerpts from the text as support for the thesis. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literary Analysis of Jeffrey Eugenides' The Virgin Suicides and Timothy Findley's Not Wanted on the Voyage

    A 6 page paper which compares and contrasts the authors, their writing styles, they ways in which they convey themes, symbols, storylines, settings and characterizations and, in particular, considers the role of women in their respective novels. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • A Review of the Eighteenth Century Play The Love Suicides At Sonezaki

    A 4 page discussion of the early eighteenth century play by Japanese dramatist Chikamatsu Monzaemon. This paper discusses the sexual and religious intonations of the play and discusses it from Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, Roman Catholic, and modern American perspectives. No additional sources are listed.

  • The Virgin Suicides Aspects

    A 5 page essay that consists of 5 one-page short essays that each address some aspect of the novel. Topics covered include social and psychological aspects a narrative that describes the suicides of five sisters. What the boys think of the Lisbon sisters; why Trip leaves Lux on the football field; Dr. Hornicker's opinion; the symbolism of the debutante party are discussed. No additional sources cited.

  • Suicide in 'The Awakening' by Kate Chopin

    An 8 page paper which examines why Edna, in Kate Chopin’s “The Awakening,” committed suicide. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Chopin/The Awakening/Suicide as Closure

    A 4 page reaction essay to Kate Chopin's nineteenth century novel The Awakening. In this essay, the writer argues that Edna Pontellier commits suicide not because she cannot escape the yoke of patriarchy, but because she cannot escape her own scarred psyche and the biological destiny of being female. No additional sources cited.

  • William Gibson's Johnny Mnemonic

    A 5 page research paper that examines cyberfiction via the example provided by William Gibson's "Johnny Mnemonic." The writer argues that an examination of this narrative demonstrates that cyberfiction writers, such as Gibson, are very aware of social issues and the implications of the rapidly increasing complexity of technology. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Cyberpunk Lit: “Neuromancer”

    This 4 page paper discusses the science fiction/cyberpunk novel “Neuromancer.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Phaedra and Jocasta

    A 5 page comparison of character and suicide between Queen Jocasta (Oedipus the King) and Queen Phaedra (Hippolytus). The writer argues that in both instances, the Queen was a lovelorn woman; deeply frustrated and in the end, completely desperate. Jocasta's death, however, was more sudden and rash when compared with the suicide of Phaedra who had accumulated such tendencies throughout the progression of her story. No Bibliography.

  • Palestinians as Victims of War in Paradise Now, Making Of, and Palestine

    In four pages this paper examines the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the perspective of the Palestinians, which is rarely glimpsed in the media. Specifically considered in a discussion of Hany Abu-Assad’s film Paradise Now, Nouri Bouzid’s film Making Of, and Joe Sacco’s documentary comic graphics text Palestine are the Palestinians’ continued victimization because of the Israeli occupation and the motivation for young men to become suicide bombers, with the quest for truth also considered. Four sources are listed in the bibliography. TGparmakpal.rtf

  • Women's Self Determination in The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A five page paper showing how this nineteenth-century feminist author structured her novel in order to explicate her theme of the importance of a woman's self-determination. The paper asserts that far from being a "shock" ending, the protagonist's suicide is the predictable result of her inability to achieve her potential. Bibliography lists seven sources.

  • Flaubert/Emma Bovary

    A 4 page essay that discusses the causes for Emma Bovary’s unhappy life and eventually suicide. These causes include Emma’s convent education and her passion for Romance novels, which is a habit she continued into adulthood. Also in childhood, the death of her mother and the occupation of her father influenced her environment, as did the double standards of the nineteenth century in regards to the social opportunities and expectations of women and men. No additional sources cited.

  • Pericles' Funeral Oration as Reported by Thucydides

    A 3 page essay that proposes a hypothetical speech as it might have been given by a member of the Athenian leadership council in reaction to Pericles' funeral oration. The writer argues that due to the fact that Pericles largely devotes his speech to praising the virtues of the Athenian city, painting their culture as the epitome of freedom and individuality, it would have been political suicide for any Athenian leader to dispute this magnificent example of patriotic rhetoric. No additional sources cited.

  • Shange/For Colored Girls…

    A 4 page essay that consists of 4 short answers to specific questions on Ntozake Shange’s “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide when the Rainbow is Enuf.” No additional sources cited.

  • Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin

    A 6 page essay that first of all describes to the student researching this subject (in one paragraph) why the student's proposed thesis that Louise Mallard in Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour" committed suicide and why the writer chose the alternate thesis that she was murdered. The writer then offers an argument that explains and supports this thesis, which relies on the idea that while the murder was inadvertent, it nevertheless was the sight of her husband alive that shocked Louse into a fatal heart attack. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Frank Wedekind's Spring's Awakening

    A 5 page review of Frank Wedekind's play on teen sexuality, teen pregnancy and teen suicide. The writer posits that, as Wedekind so aptly points out, reliance on religious and other overtures in a society that is bourgeois in nature can only lead to destruction.

  • Analyzing Canto XIII of 'Inferno' by Dante Alighieri

    A 4 page paper which examines the suitability of the penalty of suicide, evaluates whether or not the punishment fits the crime, and considers Dante’s thoughts on the punishment. No additional sources are used.

  • Summary and Analysis of The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    This 5 page paper gives a brief summary of Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening. The ending is analyzed for content and intent of the author. Critical analysis is given to the suicide and its meaning. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'A Family Supper' by Kazuo Ishiguro

    A 5 page analysis of Kazuo Ishiguro's short story that deals with a "family supper" that highlights the differences between the generation that fought World War II and their children, who have come under Western influences. The writer argue that this "generation gap" is particularly evident in regards to how the characters view suicide. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Interpretation of a Specific Passage

    A 3 page essay that analyzes a passage from Tolstoy's novel and discusses it in relation to the rest of the book. Tolstoy's epic novel Anna Karenina, after dealing with adultery, disillusionment, being social ostracized and finally with suicide, concludes with a life-affirming declaration by one of the novel's principal characters, Konstantin Dmitrich Levin. Examination of this passage shows that it successfully enforces one of the themes that Tolstoy has stressed throughout the course of the novel, namely the importance of family to happiness and a sense of meaning in life. No additional sources cited.

  • Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller and its Tragic Hero Willy Loman

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the concept of Willy Loman as a tragic hero. Arthur Miller’s character Willy Loman in his play “The Death of a Salesman” comes across as a tragic hero. As the tragic hero, Loman is both the bane yet the central axis of his family with whom he is unable to connect and form significant relationships. Loman’s own delusions lead to much of the tragic perception of him as it appears only Willy is unable to see how unrealistic his perceptions of his life and success really are. While Loman eventually commits suicide in a last attempt to provide money which will lead to his son Biff’s success, Loman again becomes the tragic hero as his death does not live up to his original delusions but instead favors his family with “freedom”; something they had all wished for while Loman was alive. Tutorial language is inserted throughout in square brackets to assist in writing. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Feminism and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 6 page essay that analyzes Kate Chopin's masterpiece The Awakening. The writer proposes that the ultimate question in interpreting this novel to discern why Edna commits suicide. Scholarship has explored this question, and this body of literature suggests that Chopin's evaluation of patriarchy and its effects goes beyond a surface reading that defines Victorian marriage as restrictive and Edna's "awakening" as purely sexual. Close examination of this novel suggests that Chopin intended the reader to see Edna as being psychically scarred by her strict Presbyterian background and cold, patriarchal father. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Chopin's Awakening/Edna & Adele & Mme. Reisz

    A 3 page essay that discussing the roles of Adele and Mme. Reisz in Kate Chopin's nineteenth century masterpiece The Awakening, which tells the story of Edna Pontellier, a Victorian era wife and mother who rejects that era's strict interpretation of gender roles as she attempts to fashion a life as an autonomous, sexual individual and as an artist. Ultimately, however, Edna rejects even this alternative lifestyle and commits suicide. To aid the reader in understanding Edna and the motivations for her actions throughout the novel, Chopin contrasts Edna with two very different women, Adele Ratignolle and Mademoiselle Reisz. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Bram Stoker's Dracula and Kate Chpin's The Awakening Compared

    A 10 page research paper/essay that examines Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening (1899) and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). The writer argues that these works provide readers with vastly different conceptualizations of fantasy, sexuality and race. Chopin addresses the negative consequences of a woman's sexual awakening and her eventual suicide to escape the restrictions of Victorian society on female life. Stoker creates a fantasy in which an Eastern European monster preys on innocent English women and children. Examination of these two works shows that while these two authors each address common themes, they do so from diametrically opposed positions. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Nonfiction and Fiction's Portrayal of History

    This 5 page paper discusses the work of James Welch in his novel, The Heartsong of Charging Elk and the documentary with Paul Stekler called, Killing Custer. The use of various literary vehicles are explored. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • How Eighteenth Century London Society Was Shaped by the Role of Women in 'The Rambler,' 'Evelina' and 'Moll Flanders'

    14 pages in length. There has rarely been a time in the history of mankind that women have not had to struggle in order to assert their worth as a gender. From the time when males first declared patriarchal authority over their female counterparts, women have fought – in various ways and with various results – to be treated both equitably and respectfully. Literature has long reflected this perpetual struggle between the genders, most often taking the side that support patriarchal control; however, a slow but steady change began occurring in eighteenth century London society that helped nurture a growing metamorphosis, which included Samuel Johnson 'Rambler' (Misella), Daniel Defoe's 'Moll Flanders' and Frances Burney's 'Evelina: Or, the History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World.' Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • Tartt's The Secret History and the 'Fatal Flaw' Concept

    A five page paper which considers the concept of the 'fatal flaw' in Tartt's "The Secret History" and the way that their fascination with the darker side of the picturesque affects the lives of Richard and the others. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Virgin and the Gipsy by D.H. Lawrence

    This 4 page report discusses the theme of desire in the 1930 novella 'The Virgin and the Gipsy.' No additional sources cited.

  • Comparative Analysis of the Short Stories 'A Christmas Memory' by Truman Capote, 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence and 'The Child by Tiger' by Thomas Wolfe

    A 5 page comparison of themes between three short stories--—'A Christmas Memory' by Truman Capote; 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D. H. Lawrence; and 'The Child by Tiger' by Thomas Wolfe. The writer explores similarities and differences between these three. No additional sources cited.

  • Spiritual Emptiness in The Rocking Horse Winner, by D.H. Lawrence and A Good Man is Hard to Find, by Flannery O'Connor

    A 6 page paper which examines how each story explores the theme of spiritual emptiness. Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • Past and its Importance in Black Culture and Black Consciousness Afro American Folk Thought From Slavery to Freedom by Lawrence W. Levine

    An 8 page paper which examines how the African-American present culture is influenced by the past, with particular emphasis on the chapters “The Rise of Secular Song” and “A Pantheon of Heroes.” No additional sources are used.

  • Short Story Comparisons of 'Tickets, Please' by D.H. Lawrence and 'Regret' by Kate Chopin

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of loneliness as presented in both stories. No additional sources are used.

  • Literary Comparison of Graham Greene's 'The Destructors' and D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner'

    A 5 page paper (4-1/2 pp. + ½ pg. outline) which compares and contrasts each story’s plot, characters’ emotions and feelings, setting and mood, authors’ purposes (whether to entertain, satirize, realistically portray a life problem, analysis of emotions and responses, communicate a moralistic message), and the authors’ styles. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner' and the Character of Paul

    A 5 page paper which examines the short story’s ill-fated young protagonist. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • 'The Horse Dealer's Daughter' by D.H. Lawrence and the Theme of Control

    A 5 page paper which takes a particular scene in D.H. Lawrence's "The Horse Dealer's Daughter" and examines how it compares to relationships in the story. The scene involves the narrator's examination of horses, and how they may have little personality of their own and are driven and controlled by the individual with the reins. The paper examines this perspective and relates it to various characters, examining whether they have control or not. No additional sources cited.

  • Law Cannot Alter Social Injustices in Harper Lee's 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

    A 5 page paper which discusses the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, illustrating how it indicates that no law can truly change the social injustices experienced by those who are the victim of racism. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Flawed Characters in Death of a Salesman, Antigone, and Oedipus

    A 7 page paper which examines the character flaws possessed by characters in the plays Antigone, Oedipus, and Death of a Salesman. bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Oedipus Rex by Sophocles and Unwritten Law's Power

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of the power of unwritten law in Sophocles' play "Oedipus Rex." No additional sources cited.

  • Flawed Hero Victor Frankenstein

    This essay tries to answer the question of whether Victor Frankenstein, in the Mary Shelley classic novel, acted heroically or was a flawed human being; a question that literary critics and analysists have attempted to answer for decades. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Review of Eight Million Ways to Die

    A 5 page book report on Lawrence Block's "Eight Million Ways to Die." No additional sources cited.

  • 'Odour of Chrysanthemums' by D.H. Lawrence and 'Chrysanthemums' by John Steinbeck

    A 5 page essay that analyzes John Steinbeck's short story "The Chrysanthemums" and D. H. Lawrence's "Odour of Chrysanthemums." The writer argues that the female protagonists in the stories are similar, comparing similarities and differences in characterization. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Sexual Politics in Women in Love, The Rainbow, and Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence

    An 8 page paper which examines the male-centered aspects of the controversial novelist’s sexual politics, which was defined by feminist Simone de Beauvoir as “phallic pride.” Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Depiction of Women in D.H. Lawrence's Women in Love and James Joyce's Ulysses

    This is an 11 page paper discussing the portrayals of women through the characters of Molly in “Ulysses” by James Joyce and Ursula in “Women in Love” by D.H. Lawrence. Both Joyce and Lawrence intended to disrupt the current restrictive roles held by women in society. Joyce’s Molly provided a complete reversal of womanhood and took on a manlike perspective in her actions, words and infidelity. Lawrence’s Ursula however, maintained her independent thoughts and actions as a woman while attaining equality within her relationship and marriage. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence, 'Everyday Use' by Alice Walker and Families

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts the families in Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” and D.H. Lawrence’s “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” No additional sources cited.

  • Money in 'The Lame Shall Enter First' by Flannery O'Connor and 'The Rocking Horse Winner by D.H. Lawrence

    5 pages in length. Money's presence in D. H. Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse Winner" and Flannery O'Connor's "The Lame Shall Enter First" illustrates how people become far too dependent upon its purported ability to ease life's problems. While both stories provide perfect examples of the way in which contemporary culture has turned into a money-dependent society, Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse Winner" badgers the point home with such force that the reader suspects from the very start how significant a role money will play in the characters' ultimate conflict. Similarly, O'Connor's "The Lame Shall Enter First" captures the essence of depravation, as well, when Rufus refuses to accept the valuable telescope Sheppard gives him so that he might become "enlightened." No additional sources cited.

  • D.H. Lawrence's 'Horse Dealer's Daughter' and the Character of Mabel

    A 5 page paper which examines the character of Mabel in “Horse Dealer’s Daughter.” The paper focuses on three elements of her character which help to define the character’s role. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • Social Transgressions in D.H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers

    A 9 page discussion of the odd circumstances portrayed in this early twentieth century novel depicting the life of young Paul Morel. Lawrence treads on societal prohibitions when he presents the graphical account of the odd relationship which existed between his protagonist and his mother. He does so not because he wants to harness the “shock factor” in order to captivate a reading audience but because he wants to explore the most primal aspects of mankind’s nature.

  • Human Nature and Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

    This 5 page report discusses Conrad’s best-known work and its many layers which ultimately presents a variety of shades of darkness. Not only are there the human conflicts and measures of darkness but there are also social implications presented in terms of the conflict that takes place between what is lawful and what is against the law (morally, logically, and legally), self-restraint compared to personal and uncontrolled self-indulgence and at the core of all that, the conflict between order and chaos. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence

    A 6 page paper which examines elements of the supernatural, irony, and symbolism seen in D.H. Lawrence’s short story “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” No additional sources cited.

  • Values According to William Faulkner, Willa Cather, and D.H. Lawrence

    A 9 page research paper that examines D.H. Lawrence's "Rocking-Horse Winner," Willa Cather's "Paul's Case," and William Faulkner's "Barn Burning" as examples of short fiction in which a young protagonist is challenged by materialism, either their own or their parent's. In each story, the point is made that values influence not only how life is lived, but also how it is perceived. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • James P. Gray's Why Our Drug Laws Have Failed and What We Can Do About It ”: A Discussion of the Premises of Author James P Gray in Comparison to the Philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Machiavelli, Locke, Hobbes, and Ro

    A 5 page exploration of the question of whether drug laws are serving a positive societal function. Gray contends that not only are drug laws ineffective, they are counterproductive and potentially devastating. This contention is evaluated in light of the contentions of numerous other philosophers. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver and Applicatioins of Erik Erikson and Lawrence Kohlberg's Theories

    This is a 7 page paper discussing Kohlberg and Erikson’s developmental stages as reflected in Rachel from “The Poisonwood Bible”. In Barbara Kingsolver’s 1999 novel “The Poisonwood Bible” the fifteen year old daughter, Rachel, reflects primarily Lawrence Kohlberg’s “conventional” level of moral reasoning and the progression from Erik Erikson’s “identity versus role confusion” (stage 5) to “intimacy versus isolation” (stage 6) levels of personality development. Rachel is considered the most self-absorbed of the characters within the novel and because of this her perspective remains primarily a selfish one and how her family’s environment and values impact her life and development. However, from Rachel, readers can also see a development in her awareness of her surroundings and although she remains still fairly self-absorbed she at least realizes how little impact her and her family and their Christian intentions have on the social and physical environment of the Congo showing a maturity of her moral and personal development. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Importance of the Mother to D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner'

    A 4 page paper which examines the significance of the mother in D.H. Lawrence’s “The Rocking Horse Winner.” No additional sources cited.

  • Comparing and Contrasting Graham Greene's The Destructors and D.H. Lawrence's The Rocking Horse Winner

    This 3 page paper offers an outline, thesis statement and contrast/comparison of characters, themes and plotlines of D.H. Lawrence's The Rocking Horse Winner and G.Greene's story, The Destructors. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'You Touched Me' and 'The Horse Dealer's Daughter' by D.H. Lawrence

    A 3 page paper which compares and contrasts elements from D.H. Lawrence’s short stories “The Horse Dealer’s Daughter” and “You Touched Me.” No additional sources cited.

  • Antigone and the Tragic Flaw of Antigone and Creon

    A 3 page paper which examines the tragic flaw which led to the downfall of Antigone and Creon in “Antigone.” No additional sources cited.

  • 'The Man Who Died' by D.H. Lawrence

    This 4 page paper examines this early Lawrence story that was originally entitled The Escaped Cock. The significance of the original title as well as the repetitive nature of the phrase "the man who died" are each discussed. The story is also analyzed in a more general sense. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Battle of Gettysburg and Geography's Importance

    This 5 page paper provides a discussion on Killer Angels by Michael Shaara in reference to geographic considerations. Killer Angels intricately portrays events that occurred during the Battle of Gettysburg. No additional sources cited.

  • Themes in the Works of Alexei and Ivan, the Brothers Karamazov

    This 4 page paper provides an overview of the central themes of The Brothers Karamazov. This is a story of two brothers, Ivan and Alexei, and their trials in the midst of changes in late 19th century Russia. While these two brothers share common elements including geography and social development, they are significantly different in a number of important ways.

  • National Geography Standards and Jules Verne's Around the World in Eighty Days

    This is an 11 page paper discussing “Around the World in Eighty Days” in regards to the National Geography Standards. When Jules Verne wrote “Around the World in Eighty Days” (1873), the world seemed a much larger place and was just beginning to become more easily circumnavigated in a relatively short time because of the technological advances. Using the National Geography Standards comprised of six essential elements which make up the eighteen standards, it is useful to note that the elements can be identified within Verne’s work. Verne wrote an adventure fantasy story well over a century ago but was able to convey many of the essential elements used in the geographical standards and descriptions still used today. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Dakota A Spiritual Geography by Kathleen Norris

    This is a 5 page analysis of Kathleen Norris’ “Dakota: A Spiritual Geography”. Tutorial language appears throughout the text in square brackets as an aid for writers in their analysis. Kathleen Norris’ 1993 book “Dakota: A Spiritual Geography” relates the spiritual journey and shift Norris and her husband have experienced since moving to South Dakota twenty years ago to tend the family farm. Although a Protestant, she has become an oblate to the local Benedictine monastery and has come to appreciate their isolated and peaceful existence. Norris and the monks’ spirituality are heavily connected to the landscape which is beautifully described by Norris’ poetic and artistic hand but it is a landscape and an existence which must be chosen by an individual in order to be appreciated according to Norris. In a time when materialism and wealth seem to have become prevalent motivators in the world, Norris reveals to readers how spiritually satisfying her life has become as she has been able to center herself in relation to her landscape and the community she has adopted. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Chinese Literary Examples The Fox Fairy and The World Inside a Pillow

    A 6 page examination of these two examples of Chinese literature. This paper presents a brief outline of the key points of each of these stories and discusses the interblending of actual historical events, geography, and time with fiction. An emphasis is placed on the unique role of intertextualization. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Los Angeles for Authors

    This 5 page paper looks at Los Angeles as a setting for The Day of the Locust but also touches on another work called Mildred Pierce. How L.A. is portrayed in literal geographic terms as well as its cultural geography are explored. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Playing in the Dark by Toni Morrison

    A 4 page book review that summarizes and analyzes the points made by Toni Morrison in her text Playing in the Dark, which deals with the traditions of American literature. Morrison begins her exploration of the literary imagination by voicing her intention to "draw a map...a critical geography" than what is typically presented in American literature (Morrison 3). This "map" is laid out in three sections that build upon each other, revealing a landscape in American literature that is largely unexplored and indicative of African Americans abiding influence on all things considered to be "American." No additional sources cited.

  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson and Films Inspired by This Novel

    A 5 page paper which examines how the films “Fight Club” and “Memento” have themes similar to those found in Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • William Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily' and Other Examples of Eccentricity

    A 5 page paper which examines William Faulkner’s character Emily, from “A Rose for Emily,” in terms of her eccentricity. Emily is discussed in relationship with other fictional characters who share some of her traits. The characters discussed are Carrie, from the film “Carrie,” Norman Bates from the film “Psycho,” Eleanor from the film “The Haunting,” and Annie from the film “Misery.” Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night/On Film

    A 7 page research paper/essay that discusses 2 film adaptations. While there are numerous film adaptations of Shakespeare’s tragedies, the Bard’s comedies have proven to be notoriously difficult to translate successfully to the screen (Crowl 69). However, Kenneth Branagh’s Much Ado About Nothing (1993) and Trevor Nunn’s Twelfth Night (1996) successfully overcome the challenges inherent in a film adaptation of a Shakespearean comedy, as both films were artistically and commercially successful. First of all, these films overcome the problems of translating the plays from the restrictive confines of the stage to the visual options available in film. They also combine aspects of Hollywood storytelling and cinematic technique that are familiar to modern audiences with Shakespeare text and, thereby, imbue the classic plays with fresh energy and postmodern aesthetic. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Analysis of Literary and Film Versions of The Color Purple

    A 5 page paper which examines how a literary work will manifest itself in a very different way when put into film. The novel/film discussed is “The Color Purple” by Alice Walker, film directed by Steven Spielberg. No additional sources cited.

  • Where the Heart Is

    A 5 page paper which discusses the film and the book Where the Heart Is. No additional sources cited.

  • The Chancellors A History Of The Leaders Of The British Exchequer, 1886-1947 by Roy Jenkins

    12 pages in length. Roy Jenkins' purpose for penning The Chancellors: A History of the Leaders of the British Exchequer, 1886-1947 was not so much to chronicle the political contributions of each of the nineteen men who held office during this particular period; rather, the author chose a more personal approach as a means by which to portray the psychological and political components of each protagonist. Unlike similar accounts on the subject, Jenkins employs a significant sense of humor, not-so-subtle irony and rather unflattering perspective of what he calls a disparate lot of British Chancellors who had no more in common with one another than somewhat more than average ability and substantially more than average ambition. Indeed, The Chancellors' essays do not represent the typical and stuffy account of history's British moneymen. No additional sources cited.

  • Storytelling and the Film Adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates' 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'

    A 4 page essay. The writing of Joyce Carol Oates frequently addresses the predicament of being female within a patriarchal culture (Wesley 75). In her short story, "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" Oates again addresses this subject in a way that focuses on the cruel initiation into the sexual realities of male domination for the story's fifteen-year-old heroine, Connie. The film Smooth Talk (directed by Joyce Chopra, 1985) dramatizes this work. In many ways, the film remains faithful to the critically acclaimed short story, however, the director chose to alter the ending and some critics found this inappropriate. However, examination of this feature of the film shows that it fits with Oates' intentions in her storytelling and is, therefore, an appropriate ending to a superb film adaptation. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Two Versions of Frankenstein

    This 7 page paper compares the novel with the 1931 film directed by James Whale. It argues that the novel is philosophical while the film is a horror classic; it also argues that the Monster can be seen as being symbolic of the status of women in society at that time. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Novel and Cinematic Comparisons of The Great Gatsby

    5 pages in length. When one compares the book version of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” to its movie counterpart, it is quite easy to point out the significant similarities, inasmuch as there was no way for the film director to stray too far from the author’s primary theme and still remain true to the story’s message; as such, the contrasts that one might experience between the two media forms appear to be nothing more than superficial differences that typically separate film from literature. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Joyce Chopra's Smooth Talk Film and Joyce Carol Oates' 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'

    A 6 page paper comparing Joyce Chopra’s film “Smooth Talk”, with Joyce Carol Oates’ “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”, the short story on which the film was based. The paper argues that in allowing the protagonist to live at the end instead of being murdered as Oates implies in her story, Chopra has changed the tale’s moral. No additional sources.

  • A Comparison of the Book and Film Versions of Alcott's Little Women

    This 28 page paper compares Alcott's LIttle women to the film version (1994) of Little Women by Gillian Armstrong. Quotes, citations, examples from various scholarly sources. Contextual support offered from both film and book versions. Bibliography lists 16 sources.

  • Holy Grail's History

    A 7 page paper discussing the sources from which the theme of the Holy Grail was gathered, and how the theme has changed over time. Sources discussed include the Mabinogion, Chrétien de Troyes, Robert de Boron, the Perlesvaus, the Queste del Saint Graal, and Thomas Malory. Bibliography lists six sources.

  • Perspective Comparisons of Western Civilization A Brief History by Marvin Perry and Ishmael by Daniel Quinn

    5 pages in length. Humankind's history has been filled with advancements; indeed, one can readily argue that since the very first time man realized he had the ability to formulate specific answers to problematic questions, he has been furthering the human race without so much as a reprieve. This unwavering progress has been recorded and taught in every classroom of every school all over the world. It would never occur to anyone who has spent his or her entire life believing such teachings that there could be something incredibly wrong with the manner by which humanity has furthered its own species. This is precisely the point of Daniel Quinn's Ishmael, which effectively characterizes the origins of civilization as nothing short of disastrous for both the planet and other species alike. When compared with the likes of Marvin Perry's Western Civilization: A Brief History, it becomes quite clear how mankind demonstrated the damaging characteristics of individualism from the beginning. No additional sources cited.

  • The Error of Reconstruction by Kenneth Stampp and Revisionist History

    Can you remember some phrase about education, which goes something like, "the more you learn, the more you discover how much you do not know." Such is the case in "revisionist history." Basically "revisionism" works from the premise of new information, or the use of additional information. Kenneth Stampp is a historic revisionist concerning the Civil War and the Reconstruction Period. In this 6 page discussion, we will examine the "new" data that he brings to light in his 1967 (and still being published) text, The Error of Reconstruction.

  • A Review of of Beloved by Toni Morrison

    A 5 page paper which discusses how Toni Morrison's "Beloved" presents us with the ghost of Beloved as a symbol of individual history and the collective history of a people. Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century British History and Authors

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the authors, as well as poets, of Britain during the 17th and 18th century not only reflected the time periods but also influenced them. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia by Samuel Johnson and Obsession

    This 5 page paper argues that this book, which is usually seen as a story about the choices of life, may be more accurately interpreted as illustrating the obsession of the main characters. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Writings and the Impact of History

    This 5 page paper discusses the relationship between the violent era in Columbia's history and the novels of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Novels examined and cited are One Hundred Years of Solitude and No One Writes the Colonel. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Analyzing 'The History Man' by Malcolm Bradbury

    This is a 10 page paper analyzing Malcolm Bradbury’s “The History Man”. “The History Man” (1975) by Malcolm Bradbury was considered by many an introduction to a new genre called “the campus novel”. The novel explored the academic and personal life of the main character, Howard Kirk, and his colleagues and students as the charismatic teacher taught his sociological perspectives on life and developed a certain scoundrel reputation as a manipulative and exploitive instructor in the satire fun-filled novel. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Apocalyptic Literature

    This 9 page paper compares and contrasts old and new apocalyptic literature. The bible is discussed along with Nostradamus . The New Age movement is highlighted. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Relationships Between Men and Women in Literature and Throughout History

    An 8 page research paper that examines how historical sources and literature have portrayed male/female relationships. The writer specifically examines this topic in regards to marriage in the nineteenth century. Literary sources discussed are A Doll's House, The Awakening and Jane Eyre. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Relationship Between Truth and History

    This 5 page paper examines two works of fiction: Coetzee's Disgrace and Churchill's Cloud Nine, and determines how fictional narrative works in relation do describing history and writing about truth. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Captivity of Women in A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson and The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper

    This is a 6 page paper on a comparison of Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” and Rowlandson’s “A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson” in regards to strength, sexuality and purity. James Fenimore Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” and Mary Rowlandson’s “A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson” both tell stories of female captives during the Indian colonial wars in the Eastern U.S. In Cooper’s work of fiction, he tells the story of Cora Munro and how she provides the strength needed to allow her pure sister to survive their captivity. Cora is of mixed blood but still finds the idea of marrying Magua the Huron “morally repugnant”. Cooper was also criticized after the publication of the work in his insinuation of doubting the purity of the colonists. Rowlandson’s true account of her own captivity stressed that she found her strength to survive her ordeal through the purity of the Psalms of the Puritan religion. Rowlandson’s strength came from her religion whereas Cora’s came from within herself and her use of her powerful sexuality: the colonist ideals remain intact however as Rowlandson survived and the impure Cora dies. These ideals of the importance of pure blood lines are still seen today in the rapes which are reported during wartime in Joanne Barkan’s article on the Serbian rape camps of Yugoslavia which were meant to bring impurity to the blood lines of the Muslims. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • An Idealistic Literary Vision of America

    A 6 page paper which examines the idealistic vision presented in characters seen in Amy Tan’s “Joy Luck Club,” F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby,” Anzia Yezierska’s “The Lost Beautifulness,” and Jhumpa Lahiri’s “The Interpreter of Maladies.” No additional sources cited.

  • Literary Time Periods

    This 3 page paper examines several literary works and explains how they reflect the times in which they were written. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Fantasy Literature and Science Fiction

    This 3 page paper considers the idea that fantasy appeals to that part of our minds that doesn't believe in fate, but insists that everything that happens to us must have a reason, and whether or not that statement makes sense. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Early Literature and Poetry of China and Japan and Women

    A 12 page research paper. Japanese and Chinese literature, both poetry and prose, have extensive roots that reach far into their histories. This is especially true of China, which is the only country in the world with a literature, written in one language, which goes back 3,000 consecutive years. Throughout their long histories, these cultures have influenced each other. The following examination of Chinese and Japanese literature looks specifically at the significance of female writers in these traditions. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Change Reflected in Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines how social, historical, political, and religious events from 1900 to 1940 are reflected in literature during the time. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature and Essay Writing

    A 3 page paper which argues that writing an essay is not very similar to writing a piece of literature. Bibliography provides student’s sources.

  • Fitzgerald's Literary Influences, and His Influence on Literature

    This 6 page paper examines the life and times of this prolific writer. How he influenced literature and how other authors such as Hemingway influenced him are issues discussed. Much information about his personal life is relayed . Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Modernism and Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines the literary movement of modernism. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Romanticism, Modernism, and Victorian Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines literature and the development of literature as seen through the work of Mary Shelley (Romancitsm), Thomas Hardy (Victorian) and Yeats (Modernism). Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Examples of Classicism And Romanticism in Literature

    3 pages in length. The writer briefly summarizes each period, as well as provides an author for each example. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Portrayals of Blacks in Works by Eldridge Cleaver, Amiri Baraka, and Zora Neale Hurston

    A 3 page paper which examines how Hurston’s concerns about the representation of blacks in literature in her essay, “What White Publishers Won’t Print” differs from the concerns of Black Arts Movement writers Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones) and Eldridge Cleaver. These African-American authors beliefs about black arts and literature should be are compared and contrasted. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Children's Literary Classic The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams

    A 3 page paper which examines if this classic literary work, first published in 1922, still appeals to contemporary children. No additional sources are used.

  • Children's Literature and Authentic Voices

    This 3 page paper discusses whether or not authors who write about their own culture do so with more authenticity than someone who does not share their ethnic background. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Influence of Ancient Literature on Dante's Writing

    This 5 page paper examines a variety of influences on Dante, such as The Old Testament and Aristotle's works. Several works by Dante are explored. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Black Boy by Richard Wright and History

    A 3 page paper which examines some of the key historical points made within Richard Wright’s novel “Black Boy.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Secret History by Donna Tartt, Alfred Hitchcock's Rope and Education

    A 6 page paper which examines the theme of education in Alfred Hitchcock’s film “Rope” and Donna Tartt’s novel “The Secret History.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime and History

    A 5 page paper which discusses some of the historical perspectives, regarding the Progressive Era, presented in E.L. Doctorow’s novel “Ragtime.” Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Samuel Johnson's The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia

    A 4 page paper which examines Samuel Johnson’s “The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia” as it relates to the society of his time, as well as the timeless theme of searching for happiness. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Upton Sinclair's The Jungle and the American Dream

    A 3 page paper which examines the historical realities in Upton Sinclair’s novel “The Jungle.” The paper then discusses whether or not the Jurgis family has lived the American Dream. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Fifty Grand,' 'The Natural History of the Dead,' and 'Hills Like White Elephants' by Ernest Hemingway

    This 3 page paper discusses three of Hemingway's short stories: Hills like White Elephants, The Natural History of the Dead, and Fifty Grand. Each are analyzed for summary, characters, and themes. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Abused Child and Historical Abuses of the Irish in The Butcher Boy by Patrick McCabe

    A 6 page paper which examines the film and novel, written by Patrick McCabe, “The Butcher Boy” as it uses the abused child as a metaphor for the abuse of the Irish in history. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie's HIstory Writing

    A 3 page paper that begins by commenting on the changes in writing history, specifically, the change to the Annales school and Braudel's total history schema. The essay then discusses Ladurie's Montaillou: The Promised Land of Error. The writer discusses how Ladurie uses the total history approach as well as the scientific approach supported by von Ranke. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Moral Attributes and History of Balzac's Colonel Chabert

    This 3-page paper discusses Balzac's Colonel Chabert, notes the story based on its times (post-Napoleonic France) and discusses whether virtue or evil survived the day. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Assassination of John F. Kennedy Portrayed in Libra by Don DeLillo

    7 pages in length. DeLillo, who represents the real in a way "many postmodernists argue is impossible" (Hutchinson 117), brings to the table an entirely unique interpretation of postmodernism; while his approach to the events surrounding the Kennedy assassination can be readily correlated with conventional postmodern thought, it nonetheless extends beyond such conventionality to the point where staunch postmodernists must stretch their own understanding of the concept to reach DeLillo's central theme. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • History of Rasselas by Samuel Johnson

    This 5 page paper examines this work and looks at it in light of Aristotle's ideas. The concept of happiness is explored. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • History Plays of William Shakespeare

    An 8 page research paper that discusses Shakespeare's ten history plays constitute a substantial portion of his canon. The main body of these plays cover the years 1398 to 1485, with two additional plays, King John and Henry VIII, forming, respectively, a prologue and an epilogue to this period (Sen Gupta 55). These eight plays offer a survey of English history that begins in the last years of the reign of Richard II and end with the death of Richard III. The following survey of Shakespeare's history plays looks at where they fit in the Shakespeare's conception of English history and their historical accuracy. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Ishmael Reed's Flight to Canada and History

    A 9 page examination of history in Ishmael Reed’s “Flight to Canada.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Medieval Italian History and Literature

    A 15 page research paper that offers brief (generally 1 page) synopses of essays that deal with Italian medieval society. Then the writer offers a more extended analysis of parts of Patricia Skinner's 2001 text Women in Medieval Italian Society; a brief essay on Dante's Inferno and Otto of Freising's Deeds of Frederick Barbarossa. The underlying theme to the entire paper is how these sources contribute to the study of history. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Literary Works and Socioeconomics

    This 5 page paper looks at several novels and short stories that demonstrate the idea that socioeconomic variables permeate modern works of literature. Although characters go through spiritual transitions, it is money and status that is the crux of their challenges. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Canadian Literature and Violence

    This 4 page report discusses violence in Canadian literature and how it is expressed by Margaret Atwood in her poetry, Sylvia Fraser in her story of surviving incest, and Marie-Claire Blais’s story of poverty in Quebec. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Women's Literature Contributions of Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street

    This 8 page paper explores the concepts of feminism, poverty, and social structure from the Mexican-American perspective. In it there are discussions of sexual power, double standards, discussions of the Mexican-American condition, and examples of feministic thought. Three sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Literature and Evolution Theory

    A 5 page research paper that examines the wide-spread effects of Darwinism on all forms of writing discourse beginning in the nineteenth century. The writer argues that Darwinism affected all branches of writing, from essayists to novelists, with each work reflecting the personal orientation of a particular author, writer or social philosopher. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • French Literature and Nationalism

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts two works in respect to its embrace of nationalism. Nationalism is defined. The thesis of this paper, provided by a student, is that nationalism is overtly expressed throughout both Baron de Marbot and The Storm of Steel through graphic bloody warfare and deep emotional despair. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature and Women of High Society

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts James's Daisy Miller with the woman in section 11 of Song of Myself. Social status and behavior are discussed along with a variety of thematic elements. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literature for Young Adults and Homosexuality

    This 6 page personal essay discusses homosexuality and the fact that it should be presented in young adult literature along with any other issue that will have an impact on a young person’s life. The author points out that there are people who think of it as a the most heinous of sins “against nature” and others who believe it is of no more relevance than the color of one’s eyes. And, of course, there are others who are convinced that they “aren’t bothered” by gays and lesbians but don’t understand why “they can’t just keep to themselves.” Each of these attitudes are attitudes which have evolved as the result of personal experience and belief systems, most of which were established before a person reached adulthood. What an adolescent or teen reads serves as an important component in shaping his or her beliefs. To deny that homosexuality exists r to declare it as a perversion or sin only serves to negate the existence of an entire group of people. No sources listed.

  • Ancient Literature on the Life's Meaning of Moral Order

    This 7 page report discusses three pieces of ancient literature -- Homer’s Iliad, Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, and Aeschylus’ Agamemnon -- as examples of the relationships that exist between humanity and the gods. Each of the stories demonstrate the fact that the gods are who will determine the outcomes of humans’ lives, regardless of what humans do. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Medieval Literature and Portrayal of Political Issues

    A 7 page paper which examines how two Medieval works offer us an examination of the political structure of the time period. Though the works do not directly discuss politics, they get a great deal of information across to the reader through such political examinations as gender, social class, and the issue of power. The stories examined are "Guigemar" by Marie de France and "Erec and Enide" by Chretien de Troyes. No additional sources cited.

  • Literary Analysis of Existentialism

    A 12 page overview of the literary classification of existentialism. Parallels the major components of this style with the existentialism approach in psychology, an approach which delves into our innermost characteristics to bring us to a comfortable relationship both internally and with those around us. Analyzes “The Innocents Abroad” by Mark Twain, “Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage” by Alfred Lansing, and “Cold Mountain” by Charles Frazier to identify existentialist components and provides a further comparison of the style to the Greek tragedy “The Odyssey” as a reiteration of the common elements which have been at play throughout history, not just in the nineteenth century. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Life as Seen Through the Classics

    5 pages in length. There exist a great many philosophies by which people live their lives, which ultimately help maintain order and a sense of direction that otherwise would merely drift in subconscious thought. Examining these varied philosophies as they relate to Benjamin Franklin's attitude toward achieving material wealth and rising in the world; Henry David Thoreau's argument for a more spiritual way of life; Ralph Waldo Emerson's insistence on the need for self reliance and thinking for one self even to the point of separation from others; and Nathaniel Hawthorne's sad portrait of Young Goodman Brown, one finds that the separation between and among these philosophies reflects the distinct separations that also divide society. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature Considerations of Global Issues

    The role of literature is to provide a mirror image of the world, its cultures and conflicts in a way that adds meaning and understanding to the processes of change and development. This 6 page paper examines Season of Migration to the North by Tayeb Salih; Survival At Auschwitz by Primo Levi; Wild Thorns by Sahar Khalifeh and Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad to explore the uses and devices of global literature. No additional sources are listed.

  • English Literature of the 17th Century

    A five page paper which looks at a variety of seventeenth century English writers and the way in which they use satire, irony and caricature to effect social and political comment. Bibliography lists 9 sources

  • Naturalism and Realism in the Literature of the Nineteenth Century

    A seven page paper which looks at the concepts of realism and naturalism in fiction, particularly in relation to Howells' 'The Rise of Silas Lapham' and Dreiser's 'Sister Carrie'. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • American Literature Trends

    A 5 page research paper that argues that the prevailing trend in American literature has been to question the concepts and assumptions that were prevalent in the past. The world view of past eras was predicated on the notion that some people, typically white males, were superior to others, such as, people of color or anyone female. American authors have consistently questioned previously accepted paradigms of exclusion and privilege. Furthermore, American literature has consistently focused on one of the major activities propagated by those who have power and privilege by questioning the age-old concept of war as something glorious and noble. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Realism and Social Problems

    5 pages in length. The writer discusses William Dean Howells' "Editha," Kate Chopin's "The Awakening," William Faulkner's "The Sound and the Fury" and Toni Morrison's "Beloved" as they relate to Realism. No additional sources cited.

  • Sixteenth Century Literature and Parody

    The sixteenth century was the beginning of the Renaissance, where the yoke of the Church was being thrown off and the possibilities of science were balanced with a humanitarian outlook toward the future. Under these conditions, it is easy to see why the writers of this era would resort to parody in order to ask, "do we need to continue believing this message?" This 6 page paper looks at a number of sixteenth century works in terms of the use of parody. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Literature and the Nature of Good vs. Evil

    A 10 page analysis that examines five classics from British literature and how these works characterize the struggle between good and evil. The works profiled are: Macbeth, Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde, Heart of Darkness, Fellowship of the Ring and A Christmas Carol. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Homosexuality

    A 21 page paper which examines E.M. Forster's "Maurice" and Radclyffe Hall's "The Well of Loneliness" as they involve conditions of homosexuality. Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Literature and How It Has Evolved

    This 5 1/2 page paper gives a chronological timeline of literature and its development. Reasons for the evolution of form, structure and use of literary devices are given. Representative authors are mentioned as well as their works. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • An Address of Four Specific Questions in Literature

    A 9 page research paper that addresses 4 questions on literature. The writer addresses point of view in Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart"; setting in Chopin's "The Storm"; critical writing (analysis) on Jackson's "The Lottery"; and tone/style in Tan's "A Pair of Tickets." No additional sources cited.

  • Feminists Sylvia Plath and Cary Churchill and Their Literary Messages

    An 8 page examination of Plath’s “The Bell Jar” and Churchill’s “Top Girl” and the underlying societal messages. The author of this paper contends that each of these women’s work is largely directed at the injustices of a patriarchal society. The manner in which these women deal with those injustices, however, vary considerably. Each utilizes their personal experiences to form the basis for political critique. While Plath does so from the individualist perspective, however, Churchill approaches said change from a societal standpoint. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature, Film, Identity, and Travel

    An 8 page research paper that examines the connection between travel and identity construction. The writer looks specifically at Shakespeare's The Tempest, Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and Coppola's Apocalypse Now. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Italian Literature and the Themes of Escape, Alienation, and Entrapment

    A 6 page paper which examines the themes of alienation, entrapment, and escape in two Italian pieces of literature. The literature examined is "The Garden of the Finzi-Contini" by Giorgio Bassani and "The Secret Diary" by Alba De Cespedes. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Edgar Allan Poe's 'Fall of the House of Usher,' Art and Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the poem "The Haunted Palace" and other literary and artistic works presented in the house in the story "The Fall of the House of Usher" by Edgar Allan Poe. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 4 Brief Literature Essays

    A 10 page research paper that is composed of 4 short essays (roughly 2.5 pages each) on works by J.D. Salinger, Kate Chopin, Thomas Hardy, Saul Bellow and Annie Proulx. Works discussed include: Chopin, The Awakening; J.D. Salinger, For Esme with Love and Squalor, De Daumier-Smith's Blue Period, A Perfect Day for Bananafish; Hardy's On the Western Circuit; Proulx's The Shipping News, and Bellow's Something to Remember Me By. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Freedom Themes

    This 5 page paper examines the theme of freedom, and looks at authenticity, in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass and Kate Chopin's The Awakening. Different types of freedom are explored. The works are compared and contrasted. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Mexican Literature Comparison Victor Valle's Recipe of Memory Five Generations of Mexican Cuisine and Ruben Martinez's Crossing Over A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail

    A 5 page overview of the content of these two books and the differences in presentational style elected by each author. The author of this paper emphasizes that Mexican literature offers a wide gamut of style and subject matter. Of particular interest is the way different writers chose to present their information. Some chose a discursive appropriation while others use formal appropriation. The approach elected by Valle falls into the latter category while that of Martinez falls into the former. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature and Characterization

    This 6 page paper takes Doris Lessing's short story, Through the Tunnel and applies the techniques of characterization to it. The elements discussed are the author's use of symbolism, speech patterns, appearence, name, behavior, images and action. A brief overview of the short story given, as well. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literary Image of Mulattos

    A 4 page paper which examines the Mulatto image presented in “Plum Bun” by Jessie Fauset and “Quicksand” by Nella Larsen. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • British Literature 18th vs. 19th Century

    A 9 page essay comparing 18th and 19th century literature. Writer describes themes, styles, and their relevance to the changing times. Most works discussed are by English authors including Chaucer, Defoe, and so forth. Bibliography lists 4 primary sources.

  • Music and Song in Latin American Literature

    In 5 pages the author discusses the trope of song/music in Latin American literature, addressing the work of various Latin American writers. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Comparative Literary Analysis of William Faulkner's Modernism and Toni Morrison's Postmodernism

    This 4 page research paper explores twentieth-century modernist and post-modernist literature, as reflected in the works of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison. Specifically discussed are the style and content with their works with the social, culture and philosophical context of their writings through examination of excerpts from two of their short stories, A Rose for Emily and Recitatif. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Bear Comes Home by Rafi Zabor and Jazz

    A six page paper on Rafi Zabor’s fascinating novel about a bear who plays alto sax. The paper shows how Zabor’s use of a performing bear as a protagonist is an allegory for the traditional position of the black person in the arts; it also describes the strong bond between the jazz and literature. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • Western Classical Literature and Women

    A five page look at the role women have played in Western literature from the Old Testament through the Greeks and Romans through the Middle Ages and early Renaissance to the Romantic era. Works discussed include the Bible: Homer's Iliad and Odyssey; Aeschylus' Agamemnon; Euripides' Medea; Virgil's Aeneid; Dante's Inferno; the works of Petrarch; Cervantes' Don Quixote; and Goethe's Faust. Bibliography lists two sources.

  • Literature, Society, and the Individual

    This 7 page paper explores this theme in light of the following five works: Antigone, Utopia, Brave New World, The War of the Worlds and Herald. Context is discussed as well as applicability in today’s society. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Literature and Free Will

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Stephen Crane's 'The Open Boat' with Jack London's 'To Build a Fire.' The concept of free will is explored in respect to the characters in these works. The short stories are compared and contrasted. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and the Influence of Sir Isaac Newton

    8 pages in length. Newton's influence upon the literary world maintains its foundation within the concepts of truth and reality. Instrumental in inspiring writers from all walks of life, Newtonian concepts have become an integral component for those writers who strive to incorporate a deeper, more meaningful existence to their literary experiences. The writer discusses that when one attempts to assess Newtonian influence upon literature, evidence can be found in virtually every genre. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Classical Greek Literature and Women's Tragic Marriages

    A 4 page paper that examines the recurrent theme of woman's tragic condition, especially in the matter of marriage, as presented in the Greek tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Works discussed are Agamemnon, Tereus, and Medea. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Frank Serpico and Willie Stark

    This 5 page paper compares the real life Frank Serpico and the fictional Willie Stark who appears in All the King's Men. Corruption is the theme as they are compared and contrasted to one another. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • European Enlightenment and Literature

    This 9 page paper explores literature in the eighteenth century in Europe, known as the Age of Enlightenment, an age in which reason and common sense, as demonstrated by the scientific method were put forth as the real remedies of society's ills and 'progress' was seen as a law of human development. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • American Literature and the Issue of Class

    This 10 page thesis paper explores the proletarian movement in the thirties. The paper supports the idea that literature highlighting class differences spans the entire twentieth century. The works which are a primary focus is Sinclair's The Jungle and Odets's Waiting for Lefty. The concept of class is viewed in terms of how it is portrayed in American literature as well as its relationship with political ideology. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literary Considerations of Greed

    This 5 page paper looks at Willy Loman of Miller's Death of a Salesman and Milkman in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon to explain how these characters are driven by greed. The characters are compared and contrasted. The subject of greed and the American Dream are explored as thematic elements of these works. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature's Classic Adventure

    This 5 page paper supports the thesis that adventure is included in many works because human beings thrive on conflict and would not be content with peace. Homer's Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid and Dante's Inferno are examined. The concept of adventure and justifications for inclusion are explored. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature of the Late Eighteenth Century and Humanism

    A 7 page research paper that examines the way the themes of nature and humanism in late 18th century and how this reflects a natural progression from earlier eras. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Propaganda and Literature Relating to British Imperialism

    The literature of Imperialist England included themes based on social Darwinism, the crisis of faith, imperialism, poverty and progress. This 7 page paper explores the issues in Milton's Paradise Lost; Behn's Oroonoko and Swift's Gulliver's Travels that pertain to the cultural context of the British Empire. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Literature and Human Relationships

    This 5 page paper takes The Birds by Aristophanes, four Woody Allen films, and Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra and finds common ground. Human relationships are the focus of this paper that highlights the use of comedy. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literature and Analysis of Character, Theme, Symbols, and Setting

    This 11 page report discusses a number of well-known literary works that offer a broad range of styles and concepts relating to the 19th and 20th century literary experience. Authors considered are Nathaniel Hawthorne, James Joyce, William Faulkner, Henrik Ibsen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, poet Elizabeth Bishop and brief references to William Shakespeare’s “Othello” and Robert Burns’ “Red, Red Rose.” Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature and Women's Social Status

    This 5 page paper examines Poe's 'The Fall of the House of Usher ' and Hawthorne's 'Rappaccini's Daughter' and discusses the portrayal of women as evil. General trends in society are duly noted. Common themes are explored. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Overview of Japanese Literature

    18 pages in length. Japanese literature exists for the lessons that can be learned via the authors' insight and experience. There are myriad themes presented in Asian literature, not the least of which includes family, patriarchy, gender, sex, death, heritage, tradition, ethnic identity, social conflict, change and celebration. However, the writer only needs to be of Asian persuasion – not specifically Japanese – in order to effectively address the complexity of these vast and varied themes. The writer discusses Yukio Mishima, Amy Tan, Pa Chin and Pyong Gap Min. Bibliography lists 13 sources.

  • James Joyce's Writings and the Concept of Paralysis

    A 5 page paper which discusses how various stories use the idea of paralysis. The stories presented for contrast and comparison are 'Araby' 'A Little Cloud' 'The Dead' and 'Eveline,' all of which were written by James Joyce. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • Feminist Literature's Portrayal of Prejudice and Oppression

    This 11 page paper looks at Zami: A New Spelling Of My Name" By Audre Lorde and the way in which we can see social criticism of different forms of prejudice include gender, race and sexuality. The way this is communicated in the book, and the underlying message are considered by looking at social norms and the way in which, as a reader, we may interpret the book. The bibliography cites 4 sources.

  • Classical Literature Compared

    A 5 page paper which examines these classical literary works converge, in terms of literature, philosophy and theology; their differences in viewpoints; and their central themes and highlights. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literary Naturalism

    This 5 page paper looks at the way naturalism is used as a literary style in the works of Sinclair Lewis, Jack London and Frank Norris. The paper starts by considering what we mean by naturalism and then goes on to look at these authors works and styles, noting similarities and differences. The bibliography cites 5 sources.

  • Literature and Male Cruelty

    This 9 page paper examines Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys and To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf and explores the gender relationships in each. Male cruelty, mental illness and isolation are discussed. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Irish Literary Themes in 1916 by Morgan Llywelyn

    A 5 page paper which how the fiction of Morgan Llywelyn examines the conflict between the soul and the body, the destruction wrought by time, and man’s need to find something permanent in the midst of change. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Little Girls and the Effects of Children's Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the significance of children’s literature on young girls, considers whether or not it matters if the work is written by a male or female author, and specifically considers examples from L. Frank Baum’s “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s “The Secret Garden.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Medieval Literature and Common Themes

    This 6 page paper examines three works: Beowulf, The Song of Roland and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Three common elements for the stories are highlighted. One is that each contain elements of fantasy, another is that they all contain a great degree of human suffering, and finally, each of the stories contain characters that exhibit loyalty. No additional sources cited.

  • Feminist Utopian Literature Represented by Women on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy

    A 6 page paper which the concept of utopia from a feminist context, providing insight into the author’s ideology, with a brief background to consider the times in which the novel was written, and a specific consideration of what makes the novel utopian, in terms of content, form and structure. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Historic British Literary Heroes

    This 5 page paper looks at how heroes are portrayed in literature, with an emphasis on British literary periods. Eras discussed include the Renaissance period and the Anglo-Saxon period. Several well-known works are mentioned such as Hamlet, Gulliver's Travels and Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Optimism in Literature for Children During the Second World War

    7 pages in length. The sole objective of children's literature during World War II was to put forth a sense of strength, hope and reassurance; despite the horrors of the Depression and World War II, children's literature written between the 1930s and 1950s witnessed an unfailing optimism. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • British Literature's Mainstream Tradition and Peripheral Culture

    A ten page paper which looks at the mainstream tradition in British literature and the way in which peripheral culture and literature is gradually being redefined, particularly with reference to the works of such writers as Chinua Achebe and Derek Walcott. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Masculine Identity in Literature Questions Answered

    A 6 page research paper that answers five questions pertaining to masculine identity in short stories by Garrison Keillor, Ernest Hemingway, Sherman Alexie, and Richard Wright. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature Portrayal of Extreme Experience

    A 12 page research paper that examines Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar; Flannery O'Connor's Good Country People; and Primo Levi's Survival in Auschwitz. By examining these works, the writer argues that one can readily see how extreme experiences present a challenge to identity that is difficult to overcome, as it affects all aspects of human existence. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Medieval Literature and Male Role Model Challenging

    This is a 7 page paper discussing the works of Chaucer and Malory and their challenges to the male role model presented in medieval society and traditional literature by writers such as Aquinas. Where Chaucer wrote new works from the perspectives of powerful women, Malory wrote on the weaknesses of the heroic male figures of Lancelot and Arthur. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature and Political Overtones

    This 5 page paper outlines the poltical overtones present in both the novels of Tolstoy and Kleist. Examples are given and cited from texts.Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • American Literature's Romantic Movement

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the Romantic movement in American literature. The While the Romantic movement throughout the world reflected the importance of nature and self-realization within man, the American Romantic movement was much more individualistic in its approach and its heroes were filled with risk which removed them from the norms of society. Probably the most popular and influential of the American Romantic writers was Ralph Waldo Emerson but other great writers of the time were Henry Thomas Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, William Ellery Channing, Hermann Melville, Mark Twain and Edgar Allan Poe. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Works of Literature and Race

    This 5 page paper discusses the issue of race in the books of Salman Rushdie and George Lamming (Midnight's Children, and In the Castle of My Skin). Examples and quotes, cited and listed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Modern Native American Literature and Cultural Conflict

    An 11 page discussion of cultural conflict as is evidenced in Thomas King’s “Green Grass, Running Water”, Leslie Marmon Silko’s “Ceremony”, Gerald Vizenor’s “The Heirs of Columbus”, and Sherman Alexie’s “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven”. The author notes the underlying theme of the differences in the way the environment is viewed by Native Americans verses Non-Natives and suggests that in pre-contact cultures the villain in Native American stories took the form of witchcraft while in contemporary literature it takes the form of non-Natives. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature Shifts During Medieval Times

    A 3 page paper which examines how the changes in society led to changes in literature in the Medieval times. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature and Class Division

    This 5 page paper provides an overview of two stories--Maupassant's The Necklace and Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground--and looks at how class plays out in each. The problem of class in society is also discussed in general. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Sex

    This 5 page paper discusses the function and use of the sexual encounter in three novels: Tender is the Night(Fitzgerald), Mourning Becomes Electra(O'Neill), and McNally's Love, Honor, Valour. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Child and Adult Voices in Literature for Children

    A nine page paper which looks at the significance of the adult and child voice in three works of children's literature: Alice in Wonderland, Little Women and The Secret Garden. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Eighteenth Century British Literature and Women

    This 8 page paper discusses the role of women in 18th century British literature. This paper refers to "Evelina" and "Roxana". Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature, Ceremony, and Ritual

    This seven page paper discusses the use of ceremony and ritual in the works of Hemingway (Sun Also Rises) and Leslie Silko (Ceremony). Examples are cited from text. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Twentieth Century Literature and Gender

    This 7 page paper looks at gender, but also at class and race, in two works that focus on strong women who lived in the United States during the early part of the twentieth century. Hurston's Their eyes were watching God and Wharton's House of Mirth are each discussed. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Greco Roman Literary Works and Heroism

    This 12 page paper discusses the evolution of the hero figure in the classical Greco-Roman literature of Homer and Sophocles. The plays/stories of Antigone, Oedipus Rex, The Odyssey, The Illiad, are given a brief overview as well as analyzed for the hero's characteristics. Also included are the heroic depictions of women heroes in the stories. Specific qualities of heroes discussed and exampled. All quotes pulled from text and cited. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Poetry, Literature, and Justice and Freedom Themes

    A 5 page paper which examines a common theme in two pieces of literature and two pieces of poetry. The theme discussed is that of freedom and the works are “The Conversion of the Jews” by Philip Roth, “A Room of One’s Own” by Virginia Woolf, “Ego Tripping (There May Be a Reason Why)” by Nikki Giovanni, and “How We Carry Ourselves” by Jimmy Santiago Baca. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Cultural Stereotypes

    A 6 page paper which examines how three different novels present the reader with different cultural stereotypes. The novels discussed are “Breadgivers” by Anzia Yezierska, “The Awakening” by Kate Chopin, and “Their Eyes were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Classical Literature and Common Theme of Perseverance in Overcoming Obstacles

    A 5 page essay that argues that common themes can be found in the classical literature of the past. The writer explores the theme of perseverance that can be found in Gilgamesh, The Book of Job, The Odyssey and The Aeneid. The writer argues that in each case, the hero perseveres against adversity by overcoming obstacles that stand between him and his goal. He goes on despite those who advice that his quest is foolhardy and eventually is rewarded for his pain by reaching and achieving his goal. No additional sources cited.

  • Ancient Literature and Cultural Characteristics

    A 5 page paper which examines “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” “Oedipus the King,” and “Lysistrata” in terms of the culture of the time and the culture of today. No additional sources cited.

  • Children and Young Adult Literature with an Annotated Bibliography

    This 11 page paper provides an annotated bibliography on a variety of books in many genres. Classic works are discussed as well as contemporary realistic literature, poetry and fantasy. Annotated bibliography lists 30 sources.

  • Women's and Men's Roles in American Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the roles that men and women played in the literature of Colonial America and the New Republic. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Postcolonial Literature and Displacement

    A six page paper which considers the concepts of sense of place and displacement in postcolonial literature, especally with reference to hybridisation and the reification of indigenous culture. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • French Romantic Literary Works and Their Similarities

    A 5 page paper which discusses the similarities in the novels “Madame Bovary,” “Pere Goriot,” and “Cheri” as the literature of the French Romanticism period. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Gender

    A 5 page paper which examines how gender is presented, in “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald and “The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway, as it relates to American identity. No additional sources cited.

  • ECE and Children's Literature

    This 5 page report discusses the title topic and briefly addresses the many areas in which a teacher’s use of children’s literature can make a significant impact in a young student’s learning processes. Aside from issues related to language acquisition and development, expansion of critical thinking skills, proficiency in reading and writing, there is one very simple and very fundamental reason for using children’s literature in early childhood education. Children love stories! Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Spirituality as a Concept in Black American Literature

    This 5 page paper discusses the issue of African American Literature and the evidence of spirituality in that medium. Furthermore, this paper cites many African-American writers and their works as examples. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Cultural Literature Issues

    A 9 page paper which examines several different stories and novels that deal with cultural realities. The novels or stories examined are “The God of Small Things” by Arundhati Roy, “Maru” by Bessie Head, “Jasmine” by Bharati Mukherjee, “Secrets” by Nuruddin Farah, “Moth Smoke” by Mohsin Hamid, “Grain of Wheat” by Ngugi wa Thiong'o, “The Guide” by R.K. Narayan, “Ambigious Adventures” by Cheikh Kane and “Death of a King’s Horseman” by Wole Soyinka.

  • Literary Social Criticism

    A 5 page essay that analyzes Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Henry David Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience," and Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" as examples of literature in which the author provides social criticism. The writer asserts that in each of these works, the author argues, not only that an individual can fight the system, but also that it is his or her duty to do so. No additional sources cited.

  • Zora Neale Hurston's 'The Gilded Six Bits' and Alice Walker's 'Everyday Use'

    This 5 page paper analyzes Walker's "Everyday Use" and Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits". Specifically, this paper highlights their portrayal of women, black-on-black issues and mother-child relationships. Bibliography lists 0 sources.

  • Literature and the Use of Newspapers

    A 10 page paper which examines the use of newspapers in literature. The texts discussed are “Sister Carrie” by Theodore Dreiser and “Manhattan Transfer” by John Dos Passos. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Postcolonial Literature in Morocco and Kenya

    A 7 page paper assessing the primary features of postcolonial literature, focusing on the Kenya and Morocco through the work of Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Fatima Mernissi. Both of these views of postcolonial literature provides readers with a basis for asking “what if” questions. Though the degrees to which each goes vary greatly, each maintains that foreign influence inexorably and irrevocably changed their cultures, providing the primary feature of postcolonial literature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf and its Literary Contribution

    A 5 page paper which examines Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse” as it contributed to literature. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature, Poetry, and Self Reliance

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of self reliance in the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Frost’s “Mending Wall,” Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery,” Chinua Achebe’s “Dead Man’s Path” and Sophocles’ “Antigone.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literature, Female Characters, and the Theme of Phenomenal Women

    A 5 page discussion of the theme of phenomenal women as reflected in the female characters of Andrienne Rich, Joyce Carol Oates, Marge Piercy, Maya Angelou, Linda Paston, and Susan Glaspell. This paper acknowledges each of these authors and their female characters as having a positive role not only in the personal development of the author but also in the development of the world as a whole. They are, indeed, phenomenal women. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • DeLillo, Baldwin, and Kushner Literature Examination

    A 2 1/2 page paper which breifly examines some issues in “The Fire Next Time” by James Baldwin, “Homebody/Kabul” by Tony Kushner, and “White Noise” by Don DeLillo. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature, Understanding, and the Lack Thereof

    A 4 page paper which discusses how some characters in literature understand and do not understand one another. The works discussed are “The Old Wives’ Tale” by Arnold Bennett, “The Secret Agent” by Joseph Conrad, and “The Wings of a Dove” by Henry James. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Psychoanalysis

    This 5 page paper discusses the use of psychoanalosis on characters in great works of literature. Works analyzed include: Metamorphosis, The Fox, and The Lover. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature about the Blues and Jazz

    This 8 page paper looks at blues and jazz literature. The paper starts by examining what is meant by blues literature and then uses examples from the poetry of Sterling Plumpp, short stories by John Clellon Holmes, Langston Hughes and Josef Skvorecky before looking at Alice Walkers book and film The Color Purple. The thesis of the paper is that blues may originate and be a part of black culture, it reflects the experiences of the oppressed, whatever race they may be. The bibliography cites 4 sources

  • Literature, Poetry, and Identity Themes

    This 3 page paper discusses the theme of racism and identity in representative works of Ellison, Morales, Johnson and Lakoff. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Self Discovery and French Literature's Evolution

    This 7 page paper discusses the common theme of the search for self in throughout the history of French Literature. Examples given. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Development of English Literature from 'Beowulf' to Alexander Pope

    An overview of the development of English literature, including Beowulf, Chaucer, Milton, Donne,Jonson and Pope. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Portrayal of Women in Griselda by Boccaccio, Brothers Menaechmus by Plautus, and 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 4 page overview of the one-dimensional treatment of women in the literature of these time periods. This paper features a discussion of the depiction of Penelope from the Odyssey, the shrewd wife in “Brothers Menaechmus” and patient Griselda. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature's Deeper Meaning

    This 4 page paper discusses the interplay between symbolism, foreshadowing, setting, characterization and plot in the creation of a great work of literature. Examples given from classical/modern literary works. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Literary Portrayal of the Aboriginal

    This 8 page paper discusses the view of the aboriginal from the viewpoint of the aboriginal and the viewpoint of the outsider. Examples given from Native Americans, Australian aboriginals, and Maori from New Zealand. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Twentieth Century Literary Icon Ernest Hemingway

    A 7 page paper which examines Ernest Hemingway as a 20th century writer. His life and works are discussed. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Classic Literature and Its Social Functions

    7 pages in length. The social function of literature reflects the very essence of humanity, eloquently chronicling the subtlest nuances of man's benevolent existence, while at the same time displaying human nature in all its sordid glory. The words interwoven within the context of literature carry with them such a great deal of power that a handful of books have achieved classic status by virtue of their insightful glance into mankind's oftentimes depraved world. The writer discusses Milton's "Paradise Lost," "The Epic of Gilgamesh" and "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • From Pages to Silver Screen with Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Blade Runner

    This 6 page report discusses Blade Runner, the 1982 Ridley Scott movie starring Harrison Ford and Philip Dick’s 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? which “inspired” the movie. Looking at the difficulties of translating literature into film, this report discusses the fact that Blade Runner actually enunciates the ideology of the text rather than simply telling the same story. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Twentieth Century Literature and Theological Themes

    This 8 page report discusses the theological themes in: Updike’s The Christian Roommates; Roth’s Eli , the Fanatic; Lewis’s The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe; Archibald MacLeish’s Pulitzer Prize-winning J.B.; Hesse’s Siddhartha, Shaffer’s Equus; and Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find and Artificial Nigger. No bibliography included.

  • An American Literature Study

    This 4 page paper provides a study in American Literature by analyzing the work of William Bradford with that of Cotton Mather. This paper highlights their similarities, differences, the culture and history of the times, etc. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Women and Men in American Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines how two authors of American literature portray men and women. The authors examined are Ernest Hemingway and Kate Chopin. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • English Literature and Love from the Romantic to Victorian Eras

    This 3 page paper examines the theme of love in English literature by specifically addressing the following works: Thomas Hardy's "Tess of the D'Ubervilles", John Keats "Ode to a Grecian Urn", and Robert Browning's "Porphyria's Lover". This paper provides quotes as evidence of analysis. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature, Identity and Character Revelations

    This 3 page paper discusses the technique of character revelation used by an author. Examples are given from the last books of The Odyssey as Odysseus reveals himself to Penelope. Quotes cited from the text. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature of Early Africa and Identity

    This 4 page paper explores corporate and national identity in Sundiata and The Kebra Nagast. Background information is presented to validate claims and the role of religion in the works is also discussed. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Greek Literature as Reflective of Greek Culture

    This 3 page paper discusses the Greek culture as referenced by Plato in his Allegory of the cave. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature and Society's Veils or Illusions

    A 7 page paper which examines the veils, or illusions, of society in literature. The essay discusses characters as they make choices concerning compromises with society in exchange for happiness. The novels examined are “Robinson Crusoe” by Defoe, “Emma” by Jane Austen, “Joseph Andrews” by Fielding, and “The House of the Seven Gables” by Hawthorne. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Nature

    A 4 page paper which examines the use of nature in Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants” and Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Text and Film Versions of 'A Rose for Emily'

    A 4 page paper which compares and contrasts Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” to the film version of the story. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature of the First World War, Dying, Mutilation, and Death

    A 7 page essay that examines the work of 5 WWI British poets and also Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises. The writer argues that this literature recounts the horrors of war through subtext, that is, not stating observations overtly. Subtext, expressed through metaphor, satire and allusion, provides the motivational engine that propels these works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature, Self, and Identity

    A 7 page paper which examines the theme of identity and sense of self in “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been” by Joyce Carol Oates, “Joe Turners Come and Gone” by August Wilson, and “Cathedral” by Raymond Carver. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Violence

    A 4 page essay that analyzes three literary works in regards to their use of violence. Throughout the history of Western literature, violence has been frequently used as an integral element of narrative. While unpleasant, often horrific, violence is nevertheless a commonality of human experience and often constitutes the defining element of individual lives. This factor is clearly evident in ancient literature as well as contemporary, as demonstrated in this examination of Sophocles' Oedipus the King, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Anne Tyler's Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • French Literary Relationships Between Males and Females

    This 7 page paper looks at the novel The Invisible Man at the Window, and other French literature to see how men and women are portrayed. Gender issues are discussed in addition to the love relationships that exist between them. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literary Fiction and Self Discovery

    A 5 page paper which examines how modern literature offers a different look at self discovery than does literature from previous times. The works discussed in the examination of self discovery are Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” and Kate Chopin’s “The Awakening.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Good Men' Literary Comparison

    This 6-page paper analyzes John Wiltshier in "The Beach of Falesa" and Robert Chiltern in "An Ideal Husband" to determine how these two men becomes conflicted throughout their story.

  • Literary Depiction of Africa

    This 4 page paper discusses the influence of Africa over the characters in Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Kingslover's The Poisonwood Bible. Quotes cited from texts. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literary Depiction of Cultures

    This 9 page paper contrasts and compares literature from the cultures of premodern Japan, Spain, and Africa. Things Fall Apart, One Hundred Years of Solitude, and premodern Japanese Fiction writers cited. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Black Literature and Violence

    A 15 page research paper/essay that examines the theme of violence in Frederick Douglass' Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and W.E.B. Du Bois' The Souls of Black Folk. The writer argues that the violence regularly perpetrated against people of African descent is a common thread connecting these works. While, naturally, these authors address other issues and complications of the institution of slavery, violence provides a background theme that serves to underscore all else. It is the coercive and pervasive element that white mainstream culture uses to keep blacks "in their place" during the antebellum era, and long after African Americans theoretically were free. In regards to the slave narratives of Douglass and Jacobs, the writer focuses on the differences between male and female slave experience. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Ecocriticism and the Literature of John McGahern

    An 8 page paper which examines the literature of John McGahern from an ecocrticial position. The paper examines the relationship between McGahern’s fiction and the physical environment and the relationship between the protagonists and the landscape. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature of the Medieval Period

    This 21 page paper addresses several different topics. The authors discussed are St. Paul (Romans and Galatians); Augustine (Confessions); Gospel of Mark; Boethius (Consolation); and Gregory of Tours (History of the Franks). The essay discusses: the education of each author; who may have rewritten their original document; defining evil; authors' perceptions of a heavenly kingdom; the authors' use of belief; why each of the authors considered himself a Roman; conflict. While most of the five authors are discussed under each topic heading, not all are. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Women in A Woman by Sibilla Aleramo and The Leopard by Giuseppe Di Lampedusa

    A 4 page acknowledgment of the variation which exist in literature in regard to the presentation of women’s roles. Regardless of the country of origin, literature expresses the author’s liberty to be either sympathetic to women's roles or cynical as to those roles. Their portrayals can be either detailed, shallow, or stereotypical. In most cases literature produced by female authors is more positive in terms of its depiction of women than is literature produced by males. A particularly interesting point of comparison as to how women’s roles are presented in Italian literature exists in Guiseppe Di Lampedusa’s “The Leopard” and Sibilla Aleramo’s “A Woman”. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Eighteenth Century Literary Satire in the Works of Daniel Defoe and Jonathan Swift

    A 6 page paper which examines the use of satire in literature during the 18th century. The authors examined are Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Eighteenth Century Literature and Religion

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of religion in 18th century literature. The paper examines the work of Jane Austen and John Milton. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literary Portrayals of Lost Innocence

    A 5 page contention that the theme of vanishing youthful innocence is treated by a number of writer. The author of this paper uses the specific works of Voltaire, Henry James, Lewis Carroll, and Alison Habens to support this contention. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Literature of Black America

    An 11 page research paper that begins with brief synopses of four African American novels: Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison; Native Son by Richard Wright; The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man by James W. Johnson; and Cane by Jean Toomer. These synopses are roughly 2 pages each. The remainder of the paper is an essay that compares the endings of Native Son and Song of Solomon. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature By and About Women

    A 6 page paper which examines what a reader could gain from reading three different pieces of literature written by, and about, women. The books are “Beloved” by Toni Morrison, “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen, and “Ghost Country” by Sara Paretsky. No additional sources cited.

  • Examples of Post-Colonial Strife In Literature

    This 4 page paper examines the following stories in regards to the issue of post-colonial strife: "The Heart of Redness", "Anil's Ghost", and "Sozaboy". Furthermore, this paper illustrates how the characters in these stories are confronted with strife and how they proceed to overcome the strife that occurs in their experience. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • What Defines Americanness in American Literature

    A 4 page essay that discusses works by Chopin, Emerson, Twain, James and Irving in regards to what qualities or characteristics make American literature "American." The writer argues that in the early days of the United States as a free and independent nation, its culture was still largely derivitive of European cultures, particularly that of England. However, throughout the nineteenth century, U.S. writers successfully established a body of literature that was distinctly American, owing little to outside sources and signifying that the US possesses a literary tradition that reflects the experience of a unique people, their history and orientation toward life. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Themes in French Literary Classics

    A 10 page paper which examines themes within French literature. The works discussed are Balzac's “Le Pere Goriot,” Flaubert's “Madame Bovary,” Proust's “Du Cote de Chez Swann,” Gide's “L'Immoralist,” and Camus’ “L'Etranger.” No additional sources cited.

  • Literature of Canada and Authors Atwood, O'Hagan, and Davies

    A 6 page essay that briefly summarizes three Canadian novels -- Tay John by Howard O'Hagan, fifth Business by Robertson Davies, and Surfacing by Margaret Atwood. The writer offers a brief plot synopsis and analysis of each novel. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and the Creature in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    A 3 page paper which examines the significance of the novels that the Creature reads in Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein.” No additional sources cited.

  • Cinematic and Text Versions of Literature A Comparative Analysis

    An 8 page paper which examines the qualities that differentiate text versions from cinematic versions of literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Irish Folklore in the Poetry of William Butler Yeats

    A 10 page emphasis that Yeats' work is important not just from an entertainment perspective but also from the perspective that it preserved a critical chapter in Irish history. Many of his poems capture the spirit of Ireland, the richness of the folklore and the old wives tales as well as the soul of the quest for Irish independence. The author of the paper uses "Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites" and "Sailing to Byzantium" to illustrate this point. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature and the Theme of Appearance versus Reality

    A 6 page paper which compares and contrasts “The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams and “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker as they touch on the theme of appearance vs reality. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Modern Society and Literature

    A 5 page paper which discusses and defines literature and examines the role of literature in contemporary society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Twentieth Century British Experimental Literature

    A paper which considers the move away from traditional literary forms and towards the experimental in British literature of the mid-twentieth century, with particular reference to Woolf's To The Lighthouse and Beckett's Happy Days.

  • Insanity in Comparative Literature

    This 4 page paper examines two works: The Awakening by Chopin and Poe's The Cask of Amontillado. Protagonists in each of these works are discussed in terms of their display of insanity. The characters Edna and Montresor are compared and contrasted Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Common Themes in Literature

    This 5 page paper examines two works--Toa Te Ching and the Age of Iron--and looks for common elements. The values to come from the works are viewed to be similar. No additional sources cited.

  • True Life Stories, Literature, and Issues of Gender, Sex, and Race

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of sex, race, and gender in Toni Morrison’s “The Bluest Eye,” Harriet Jacobs’ “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” Paule Marhsalls’ “Brown Girl Brownstone,” and Henry Roth’s “Call it Sleep.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literary Psychological Growth and Spiritual Transformation

    This 3 page paper examines many works of great literature and touches on their messages as it relates to certain characters. Whether or not they grow spiritually or psychologically is discussed. Some works included are Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper. Several other works are noted. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Postcolonial Literature and Symbols

    This 8 page paper examines two works--The Sand Child and The Multiple Child-- and examines them in the context of the time and place in which they were written. Gender themes are explored. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature and Issues of Gender and Race

    This 6 page paper analyzes and compares Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, to the elements found in Marquez's work, One Hundred Years of Solitude for ways each author addresses race and gender. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Impact of Nathaniel Hawthorne's Writings on Children

    5 pages in length. Nathaniel Hawthorne understood the inner workings of his fellow man, rising to the challenge on many occasions to point out flaws, vulnerabilities and shortcomings inherent to being human. While this approach comprised a significant portion of his writings, there was still enough room for the celebrated author to infuse a bit of literary cheer into the hearts of children through two publications: Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys and Tanglewood Tales. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Aspects of Literature Analysis

    A paper which looks at various aspects of literary analysis, including the interaction between audience and text and the socio-cultural insights which can be elicited from the written text. Bibliography lists 5 sources

  • The Indo Caribbean Experience as Found in A House For Mr. Biswas

    10 pages in length. Identity is a critical theme all throughout the story that borrows directly from the Indo-Caribbean experience and cultural experience. To not only understand but also accept one's place within the larger concept of society is something Mr. Biswas struggles with for his entire life; that he is unable to rectify what he deems wrong in his day to day existence – the death of his father, a controlling and uncaring mother, a wife with no backbone and an extended family by marriage that has little respect for him – he ultimately develops an inferior sense of himself while at the same time working hard to find his own place in the world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Chinese Literary Works

    This 5-page paper discusses five works of Chinese literature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Genres Modernism and Postmodernism

    A 6 page paper which examines the journey of the hero in modern and postmodern works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Content and Gender in Feminist Literature

    This 5 page paper examines the writings of four women and discusses the impact of their gender on the content of the works. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Los Angeles Literature

    This 12 page paper discusses eight books about Southern California, explicates passages from each of them, and explains how the eight relate to one another. It also "grades" and evaluates each novel with regard to how it adds to the literature about Los Angeles and what value (if any) the book has to understanding the culture of Southern California. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • 2 Questions on Great Literature and Its Practical Applications

    This 8 page paper answers two questions posed by a student. Within the answers, six pieces of literature are used: Sappho's The Moon, The Holy Bible, Shakespeare's As You Like It, Homer's Odyssey, Mahabharata and Gilgamesh. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • American Dream Represented in Literature by Homes and Houses

    A 3 page paper which examines how "Devil in a Blue Dress" by Walter Mosley and "The House on Mango Street" by Sandra Cisneros has a theme involving the house or home. This is examined against "The Tortilla Curtain" by T.C. Boyle and "The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck wherein the focus is transferred from a house, or home, to something else as it relates to the American Dream. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Jewish Literature and the Jewish Family's Decline

    A five page discussion of the insights into Jewish families that can be found in Michael Gold's "Jews Without Money" and Tony Kushner's "Angels in America". Both authors are Jewish but both present Jews in a slightly different light than might be expected. Both depict a move away from traditional Jewish morals and mores. No additional sources are listed.

  • Restoration to Victorian Age British Literature

    This 3 page paper is a brief overview of the development of British literature from the restoration starting in about 1660, to the end of the Victorian age in 1901. The paper looks at the development of styles, content and presentation and cites numerous authors to illustrate the points raised. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • Literature, Naturalism, and the Works of Frank Norris and Rebecca Harding Davis

    This 7-page paper focuses on comparisons when it comes to Rebecca Harding Davis' "Life in the Iron Mills" and Frank Norris' "The Octopus," and how both authors use naturalism to get their points across.

  • Children's Literature Censorship

    This 10 page paper provides an overview of the literature on censorship in children's literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Three Popular American Novels

    This 12 page paper discusses three popular novels: The Street Lawyer by John Grisham; Daddy's Little Girl by Mary Higgins Clark; and The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Questioning the Past in Literature of the Enlightenment

    A 4 page essay that discusses how Enlightenment literature was different from what had come before it. While the Enlightenment looked to the classical past for inspiration, its neoclassicism endeavored to find a balance with the desire to conserve against the desire to obtain independence and its own identity (Gay, 1969). This orientation can be seen clearly various works of Enlightenment writers, such as Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Voltaire's Candide and Literature of the Enlightenment

    A 4 page essay that discusses how Voltaire's Candide exemplifies the Enlightenment. Burns (1969) asserts that Voltaire "epitomized the eighteenth century period known as the Enlightenment in a manner similar to the way that "Luther epitomized the Reformation or Leonardo da Vinci did the Italian Renaissance" (Burns, 1969, p. 571). It was Voltaire who popularized the scientific and political theories of John Locke and Isaac Newton, as he promoted the Enlightenment perspective that the natural world can be understood via the use of reason. Voltaire's Candide (1759) is representative of his Enlightenment philosophy and shows the extent to which this philosophy differed radically from what came before it. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Children's Literature and Female Role Models

    This 30 page paper provides an overview of the roll that women play in children's literature. This paper produces some solid examples of female role models and their impact. Bibliography lists 20 sources.

  • Literary Religious Themes, Symbolism, and Imagery

    Religious imagery, symbols and thematic developments are common in the literature of a number of eras, including the literature of the early 20th century. This 5 page paper outlines these elements in E. M. Forster, in his novel Maurice, and Jeannette Winterson, in Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • British Literature of the Seventeenth Century Examined

    This 5 page paper examines the writings of Johnson, Marvell, Donne, Milton, Herrick and Herbert and describes an essential conflict that all six of them addressed. It then uses that conflict to describe the ways in which these writings depart from contemporary world views. Finally, the relationship between the essential conflict and various philosophical constructs is discussed. Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • Literature and the Figure of the Vampire

    A 3 page paper which examines the endurance of the vampire figure in literature. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature and Epiphany

    A 4 page paper which discusses epiphany in literature. The works examined are Emerson’s “Self Reliance,” Whitman’s “Song of Myself,” and Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues.” Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Greek Literature and Blindness Symbolism

    This 4 page paper examines two works: Electra and The Republic. The works are compared and contrasted in terms of how the concepts of sight and blindness are utilized. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Red and the Black by Stendhal and the Characters Mathilde and Julien

    A five page paper which looks at the relationship between Julien and Mathilde in Stendhal's novel, particularly with regard to the concepts of honesty and hypocrisy as evinced by both their association and the author's portrayal of French society as a whole. Bibliography lists 1 source

  • I am Legend/Matheson

    A 3 page essay that discusses the way in which Robert Neville perceives his identity over the course of the novel. No additional sources cited.

  • Revenge as a Theme in Literature

    This 6 page paper compares the way in which the revenge theme is handled by Shakespeare in Hamlet, Poe in "The Cask of Amontillado" and Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess." Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Literature and Life

    A 3 page paper which examines Arnold Weinstein’s thesis, in his book “A Scream Goes Through the House: What Literature Teaches Us About Life,” which indicates that literature provides us information regarding human conditions. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Vernacular Tradition and African-American Literature

    This 3 page paper explains what vernacular tradition is and why Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech is an example of that tradition. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Children's Literature: Borders between Worlds

    This 6 page paper discusses the way the characters in "Wind in the Willows" and "Peter Pan" move between the real world and the fantasy world of their stories. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Gothic Movement in Literature

    A 7 page paper which examines the Gothic movement in literature as seen in the works of Edgar Allan Poe and Mary Shelley. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Symbolism in Belle Epoch Literature

    A 4 page paper which examines the influence of symbolism in Belle Epoch literature. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Sutton Hoo and its Relationship to Literature

    This 7 page paper examines this famous burial ground and looks at its significance. Literature found at the site is duly noted but its inspiration on later literature and its confirmation of literature of the day are issues explored. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Medieval Literature/Marie de France & Chaucer

    A 3 page research paper/essay that addresses 3 topics from medieval literature. The first page is on Marie de France and her lai "Lanval." The second page is on Chaucer's motivation in writing The Canterbury Tales and uses the example of the Prioress to argue that he used this novel to comment on his society. The third page discusses Chaucer's structure and influences in writing his masterpiece. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Doyle & Gaskell/Victorian Literature

    A 10 page paper that consists of two 5-page papers. The first discusses Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Bakervilles in terms of he used the concept of mystery. The writer asserts that Doyle's creation of Holmes ushered in this genre into popular consciousness. Its bibliography lists 2 sources. The second 5-page paper is on Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton and the concept of industrialization, which the writer relates to class bias and the Victorian ideas on cleanliness. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Development of Literature: Medieval to Victorian

    A 3 page paper which examines the development of literature from Medieval times to the Victorian Age. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • American Ethnic Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines what American Ethnic Literature should do. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • New Orleans Literature: Race, Class and Gender

    A 5 page paper which examines the perspectives of race, class and gender in New Orleans literature. The paper examines the work of Walker Percy, Louis Armstrong, and Ellen Gilchrist. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Medieval Law and Literature

    This 5 page paper examines several medieval laws and argues that they resemble literature, not legal documents. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Medieval Law and Literature in ‘Beowulf’

    In ten pages this paper examines how Medieval law manifests itself in the anonymously written epic ‘Beowulf’ with the focuses being the patriarchy, legal and moral duty established through patrilineal custom, the complex matter of inheritance, and the transition from Germanic customs and community obligation to Anglo law and order. One source is cited in the bibliography.

  • The Female Influence on British Literature

    A 7 page discussion of several of the female British authors that have influenced literature and society. This paper includes Mary Shelly, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Agatha Christie, Virginia Woolf, Jane Austen, Margery Allingham, and Elizabeth Gaskell. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Satire and Irony in Political Literature

    This 3 page paper examines Past and Present, The Communist Manifesto and Erewhon. Some quotes are included. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Pariarchy and the Repression of Women: Reflections in Literature

    A 6 page review of some of the writings of Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Carolyn Kizer. Included are Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour” and “The Awakening”, Gilman’s “Yellow Wallpaper” and "Women and Economics: A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution", and Kizer’s “The Bitch”. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Japanese Literature: "Essays in Idleness" and "An Account of My Hut"

    This 8 page paper compares two Japanese works of Medieval literature, "Essays in Idleness" and "An Account of My Hut." Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Christian Influence in Medieval Literature

    This 4 page paper discusses the influence of Christianity on medieval literature by exploring "Beowulf," "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" and Dante. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Impact of the Great War on Western Literature

    A 4 page essay that discusses the impact of the “Great War,” that is, World War I on Western literature. World War I is known for its “mindless squandering of human life with negligible results” (Hull 17). During its era, it was known as the Great War, the war to end all wars, as well as the war that would make the world “safe” for democracy. The Great War accomplished none of these purposes and, when it was over, the survivors were gripped by grief, guilt, rage and, in the case of one German lance corporal, a young man named Adolf Hitler, by the desire for revenge (Hull 17). The Great War had another significant effect in that it had a tremendous impact on the course of modern Western literature. The collective consciousness of both Europe and America was forever changed by World War I and this change was reflected in the literature produced both during the Great War and in the decades afterward. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Development of Literature in the Romantic Era

    A 4 page paper which examines the development of era during the Romantic Era. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster

    A 3 page paper which examines the work How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • American Literature: Realism

    A 7 page paper which examines various authors and periods in American literature as they offer images of realism. The literature examined is Kate Chopin’s The Storm, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper, and Stephen Crane’s The Open Boat. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Women in Ancient Literature and Now

    This 6 page paper discusses women in “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” “The Iliad” and “Antigone” and how they differ from women today. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Shakespeare’s Influence in English Literature and Language

    This 10 page paper discusses Shakespeare’s influence on the English language and literature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Environment in Literature: Ecocriticism, Ecofeminism and the Concept of Dwelling

    This 15 page paper examines writings by Barbara Kingsolver and Greg Garrard to explore the ways in which authors use, or examine the use of nature in literary works. It pays specific attention to the ecofeminist nature of the heroine of Kingsolver’s book Prodigal Summer, and also considers the concept of dwelling and farming with regard to sustainability. Finally, it defines ecocriticism and illustrates its use.

  • Literature of the New American Republic

    A 9 page research paper that discusses the formation and evolution of American literature. The writer discusses the effect of the Revolution on literature, the factors that influenced, the nature of American identity and westward expansion and the first generation of significant American writers. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • The Character of Mordred in Literature

    This paper consists of five pages and discusses how the character of Mordred has appeared throughout literature with the emphasis being on how he is portrayed by T.H. White in The Once and Future King. Seven sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • Native American Oral Tradition: Parallels in the Literature

    A 5 page analysis of Gerald Vizenor's ““Word War in the Word Wards” (a chapter in “Bearheart the Heirship Chronicles”) and “An Insatiable Emptiness” by Evelyn Lau. No additional sources are listed.

  • Native Experience: Literature and Film

    A 4 page paper which examines, comparing and contrasting, native experiences as seen through fiction and film. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Everyday Life in Literature

    This 6 page paper discusses ordinary life as depicted in John Updike’s story “A&P,” and then expands on the example of Sammy to include other books, and why they are considered to be realistic literature. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • American Ethnic Literature

    This 7 page paper defines what American ethnic literature is, and what it means, and why it’s important. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Treatment of Women in Literature

    This 5 page paper looks at the way the representation of women has evolved throughout literature, from “Frankenstein” in 1818 to “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,” published in 2005. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Derrida, Literature and “Midsummer Night’s Dream”

    This 10 page paper examines Derrida’s theory of literature and whether or not it is useful in teaching the subject; it also touches on how it might be applied to Shakespeare’s wonderful comedy, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature of the Renaissance and the Works of Ben Jonson, Francis Bacon, and John Milton

    In six pages this paper examines Renaissance literature and discusses how these authors and their writings reflect this period and genre. Five sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Showalter, Culture and Literature

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Elaine Showalter's A Literature of Their Own, which offers a challenge to the narrowness of the traditional canon of what is considered to be valuable contributions by women to English literature. In so doing she directly addresses the way in which culture has had an influence on women's literature. Showalter's theoretical perspective presents women's writing in terms of being a subculture, which evolved in direct reaction to the elements in mainstream patriarchal culture that tended to trivialize women's experience and role in society. No additional sources cited.

  • Submissive Characters In Children's Literature: Influence Upon Self-Perception In Female Children

    6 pages in length. Children's literature is replete with visual imagery of worlds that exist beyond reality's realm; to equip a child with a story that takes her outside her established precepts is to fortify that young mind with additional learning tools for life. However, not every lesson learned within the pages of children's literature is of a positive nature, inasmuch as some messages drive home antiquated gender identity roles that impose significantly distorted perceptions upon naïve and vulnerable readers. When cast as submissive characters by virtue of their gender, children are taught that such famous "people" as Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty represent how women are expected to be in the real world; without benefit of truly understanding the fantasy component of children's literature, they take with them these skewed perceptions and unknowingly incorporate them into their own psychological development. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The “Journey Motif” in Literature

    This 6 page paper discusses various journeys, spiritual, psychological and physical, in several works of literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • History of Latin Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the history of Latin literature. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Women in African Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines the role of women in God’s Bits of Wood by Sembene Ousmane and Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. No additional sources cited.

  • Narrative in Literature and Film: Frankenstein vs. Frankenstein

    This 6 page paper discusses the differences in the novel and film versions of “Frankenstein” from the point of view of narrative structure. Bibliography lists 6 sources

  • Southern Literature and Themes of Communication Lacks and Self Absorption

    An eight page paper surveying seven works of fiction by six different authors. The paper argues that because Southern heritage is so concerned with maintaining traditions and external forms of behavior (such as claustrophobic family ties), the Southern way of life invites its citizenry to live inauthentic lives. Specific authors and works discussed include William Faulkner's 'The Sound and the Fury,' Robert Penn Warren's 'All the King's Men,' Eudora Welty's 'The Wide Net' and 'Why I Live at the P.O.', Carson McCullers' 'Member of the Wedding,' Walker Percy's 'The Moviegoer,' and Flannery O'Connor's 'The River.' Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • The 20s and 30s and Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines the characteristics of literature between the world wars. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Yellow Wallpaper and The White Heron

    This 4 page paper compares and contrasts The Yellow Wallpaper and The White Heron. The common elements are explored in this thesis paper. No additional sources cited.

  • What Literature Does

    This 3 page paper discusses why literature is important and what it does for readers. It argues that literature engages the imagination to a much greater extend that film or TV. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Controversial Literature: Huck Finn

    5 pages in length. Controversial may well be the first word used to describe Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn long before any summary is offered. Peppered with the words "racist" and "sympathizer," any synopsis of this book would be remiss without also mentioning the legacy of debate Twain - perhaps purposely - left behind. To look at either the character or story of Huck Finn as anything but a social mirror is to read more into Twain's meaning, however, public construal continues to be divided as to the author's true intent. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Alienation in Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines the alienation that the protagonists experience in Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, Hunter S. Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Kurt Vonnegut’s Breakfast of Champions, and J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. No sources cited.

  • Characterization as a Literary Technique

    This 5 page paper examines the way in which authors use characterization to intrigue readers. It uses “Hamlet,” “Othello” and “The Story of an Hour” as examples. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Protest Literature, Valdez And "Los Vendidos"

    3 pages in length. Playing the stereotype card is the most effective of all possible ways for Valdez to point out misconceptions people have about others; indeed, it is an appropriate tool for other ethnic groups to display their discontent as well. As minorities, Chicanos are not created equal in many numbers of ways based upon a protocol established by another race entirely, a distorted attribute of human existence that otherwise defines and limits their collective ability to seamlessly assimilate into white society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Romantic Literature with Fantastic Elements

    This 8 page paper explores the differences between fantastic and romantic literature, and how one can be found in the other without classifying the whole work as one of that genre. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Uncle Tom’s Cabin as Protest Literature

    This 4 page paper discusses Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel of slavery, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • British Literature Before the 19th Century

    This 5 page paper discusses pre-19th century British literature (Swift, Pope, More, Langland and Bunyan) and why their satirical and allegorical works are important in their society. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • The Metamorphosis and The Lesson

    This 3 page paper examines The Metamorphosis and The Lesson and explains how these stories related to the larger society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Conrad, Condorcet and Achebe

    A 4 page paper which examines Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Condorcet’s essay The Future of Human Progress and Chinua Achebe’s Image of Africa. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Violence - the Monster that Torments Society Examined in Literature

    This paper uses four literary works to argue that violence is endemic in society. Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, War Child and How to Tame a Wild Tongue are used to give various examples of violent behavior. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Considerations of Stereotypical Cultural Representations in the Literature

    This 5 page paper considers whether or not non-Indigenous writers should be prevented from writing about indigenous peoples. Bibliography list 1 source.

  • Kipling and Kincaid/Perspectives on Colonialism

    A 6 page essay that uses Kipling "The White Man's Burden" and Kincaid's A Small Place to discuss the different orientations on colonialism taken by Victorians and post-colonial writers. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature Sampler

    This 10 page paper discusses four different fictional works, including two plays, Macbeth and The Hairy Ape, and two short stories, The Necklace and The Cabuliwallah. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Human Experience In Literature

    This 4 page paper compares and contrasts three stories that best illustrate either representations of common human experience, or are least representative of it. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature in America

    A 3 page paper which examines the American experience through literature. The novels examined are To Kill a Mockingbird, The Grapes of Wrath, and Call of the Wild.. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature from Australia - The Paradigm of Hell

    This 3 page paper, written in note form, considers whether or not the concept of hell in Australian literature is still relevant, looking at Australian authors and work based within and outside of Australia. The bibliography cites 7 sources.

  • The Impact of Religion on Women in Post-Colonial Literature

    This is a 3 page paper that provides an overview of how colonial religious ideals impact indigenous treatment of women. Amadi's "The Concubine" and Conde's "Segu" are explored in this light. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literature and Film Related to Rural Life

    This 3 page paper looks at rural life through films such as Field of Dreams and books like Gone With the Wind. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Meaning and Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines a common theme, concerning the need for deeper meaning, in literature as seen through Katherine Mansfield’s Bliss, Anton Chekhov’s Lady with Lapdog, and Virginia Woolf’s Modern Fiction. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • African Literature and the Importance of Generational Values

    This is a 3 page paper that provides an overview of generational value in African literature. Examples include "The Purple Hibiscus" and "Things Fall Apart". Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Houses in Literature and their Symbolic Value

    This is a 5 page paper that provides an overview of houses in literature. Examples from "Brideshead Revisited", "Rebecca", and others are used to show the symbolic value of houses. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Greek Philosophy and Literature: A Review of Concepts

    This is a 5 page paper that provides an overview of concepts from Greek philosophy. Literary examples are used to explain arete, eros, hubris, paideia, and logos. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Syllabus Design: 19th Century Literature

    This is an 8 page paper that provides an overview of syllabus design. A sample syllabus is created for a 19th century literature course. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Does Studying Literature Improve Individual Writing Skills?

    This 9 page paper assesses the connection between the study of literature and the development of writing skills. Looking at the ideas of Orwell and Graves and considering the different ways in which writing may take place with differing motivations, the potential value and impact of studying literature is explored. The bibliography cites 10 sources.

  • Early Feminist Literature - An Examination of Themes

    This is a 6 page paper that provides an overview of early feminist literature. Stories included are "The Yellow Wallpaper", "The Interpreter of Maladies", "The Storm", and "The Chrysanthemums". Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Influence of the Romantic Period

    This is a 5 page paper which discusses the introduction of the Romantic Period in history and the influences literature of the day had in regards to its influence on society, music, drama and future literature. The revolutionary change in literature from rationalism in the 18th century to truth, self-identity, and humanitarianism in the 19th century had an enduring affect which still continues today. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Author Stephen Crane and the Naturalist Literary Genre

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the naturalism genre in literature and writer Stephen Crane. American writer Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was well known for his naturalist style during his time. Naturalism in literature was a philosophy used by writers to describe humans in regards to the influences and interactions within their own environments. The characters described in naturalist literature were usually in dire surroundings and often from the middle to lower classes. Despite their circumstances however, humans within naturalist literature were able to eventually overcome their situations by some form of courage or heroism which Crane found to be consistent in all of the cultures and setting he studied. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald and Literature Influences

    A 3 page paper which examines the influence F. Scott Fitzgerald had in the world of literature and how literature influenced him. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Novel Essays by George Lukacs and Virginia Woolf

    A 5 page essay that contrasts essays by Virginia Woolf ("Modern Fiction") and George Lukacs ("The Ideology of Modernism") and how these essays pertain to the statement that "works of literature are windows in the unconscious lives of authors and readers alike." The writer argues that this statement is particularly appropriate to the modern literature discussed by Woolf and Lukacs. No additional sources cited.

  • Life's Big Questions

    An 8 page paper which examines different literature, theories, dramas, and perspectives concerning the nature of life itself in many different ways. The works of Shakespeare and Ovid’s “Metamorphoses” are among the literature discussed. No bibliography provided.

  • Times Reflected in the Writings of John Keats, Moliere, and Niccolo Machiavelli

    This 5 page report discusses three great writers whose works give modern readers insight to the times in which they lived and wrote. Some of the world’s greatest literature is that which has been created using the truths of historical fact in which the work is created. Such literature can also serve as a means by which social theorists and historians are able to gain some measure of understanding into a culture’s ideals and belief systems. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Good and Bad of Human Nature as Portrayed in Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines literature from various time periods and illustrates that the nature of humans is both good and bad, though times change and the focus of mankind changes. The literature used in this discussion is "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift, "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley, and "Heart of Darkness" by William Conrad. No additional sources cited.

  • Tragic Themes in Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, Sophocles' Antigone and William Shakespeare's Macbeth

    This 5 page report discusses the common themes that exist in these three works of literature. Great tragic literature carries with it certain common themes that define it as tragedy and which then allows the reader to understand that there is a greater story being outlined than just the one of the characters presented in a single story. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Sociopolitical Classes of Plato and Their Parallels

    A 15 page research paper that examines Plato's sociopolitical classes as outlined in the Republic and also his Theory of the Soul. This literature review, first of all, discuss Plato's theory of the soul and show how he extrapolates on this idea in the Republic to describe his conception of an ideal state. Then, a separate literature review examines the topic of social class within American society to determine if there are parallels between Plato's conceptualization of social class and current day American reality. Bibliography lists 16 sources.

  • America from a Multicultural Perspective

    A 14 page contention that contemporary America has set the stage in terms of providing an example to the world of a multicultural country. The author of this paper provides observations on how the various fractions that compose our country interrelate. These observations are provided first from an academic approach, relying on the sociological and anthropological literature, then from a humanistic perspective relying on the popular literature. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Exercise in Dante's 'Inferno'

    This 3 page paper provides an example of how to approach a writing exercise that asks one to look at other literature and put characters into the different parts of hell designated by Dante. The literature used is Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Miller's Tale and Othello. No bibliography.

  • Southern Locations and Their Importance in the Works of William Faulkner

    ( 6 pp) Introduction Faulkner's main concern lies with depicting the historical development of the South, the degeneration of values, the effect of racism and the psychological state of mind of Southerners In apocryphal Yoknapatawpha County, setting for most of his fiction and patterned after his real-life home in Oxford and Lafayette County, Mississippi, Faulkner writes of regional characters who tell of economic and social frustrations. This famous address in American literature is a familiar location to literature students of all ages who encounter it in such stories as Barn Burning, A Rose for Emily, and That Evening Sun. ibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The Ramayana Version by R.K. Narayana

    A 4 page discussion of this abbreviated version of classic tale from Indian culture. This paper presents the thesis that while R.K. Narayana's rendition of "The Ramayana" is too abbreviated to offer much scholarly use, it occupies a critical place in world literature in that it introduces the world (particularly the West) to one of the most important tales of Indian literature, a tale that would be too long and too complex to capture the attention of most western readers without the type of abridgment that Narayana has elicited. Narayana was in fact writing for a specific audience within a specific societal framework. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Health and Illness Interpretations

    A 5 page research paper that review 5 stories of illness and healing. Insight into processes associated with both illness and healing do not necessarily have to come from medical texts or research on nursing. Literature abounds with works that provide perspective and understanding about how illness, even fatal illness, can promote psychic healing and the most healing elements are not always the ones that are the most obvious. The following examination of definitions of illness and healing looks at the lessons that can be learned from works of literature, each focusing on a different aspect of illness, death and learning to live. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Imaginative Style Developed by J.R.R. Tolkien

    6 pages in length. Ever since man began telling tales, incredible accounts of freakish, monster-like animals have captivated and horrified entire communities. The basis for these extraordinary fabrications was the inability of early writers to distinguish between truth and fantasy. As the stories were passed down through generations, they eventually became accepted as the legends we know today. The younger years of one of mythological literature's most beloved writers – J.R.R. Tolkien – served to greatly impact this imaginative style; however, the author did not fully grasp his unique talent until the 1930s when he worked and reworked The Hobbit and ultimately came up with new ideas of mythological literature in the essay "On Fairy Stories." By this time Tolkien had come to realize that fantasy stories were plainly not primarily concerned with possibility, but with desirability. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Beowulf, Tempest, Don Quixote/Their Lasting Appeal

    A 7 page essay that examines 3 works of great literature. “Beowulf,” the Anglo-Saxon epic poem by an unknown poet; Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”; and “The History of Don Quixote de la Mancha” by Miguel de Cervantes illustrate the characteristics of a great work of literature that cause it to endure. Examination of these three great literary works demonstrates that each one continues to resonant with modern readers because they accurately reflect human nature. Additionally, each work demonstrates expert use of such features as characterization and plot construction. Also, each author’s use of language is lyrically beautiful and expertly executed. No additional sources cited.

  • Six Stories and Lower and Upper Classes

    A 5 page essay that addresses six works by six authors: Orwell, Dostoevsky, Goldsmith, Goldstone, Huxley and Jackson. The writer argues that literature is, among other things, a reflection of an author's perception of society, its values and concepts of knowledge and truth. As this suggests, through the medium of literature, readers can gain insights about their society, and particularly its class structure, which they may not perceive in the course of their everyday lives. This examination of six works illustrates this principle, as each tale focuses on a different aspect of class structure, informing the reader, but, more importantly, causing the reader to reflect on the justice of taken for granted societal norms. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Paula G. Allen's Spider Woman's Granddaughters and Gordon Henry Jr.'s Light People

    A 7 page book review that addresses Gordon Henry Jr.'s Light People and Paula G. Allen's short story collection Spider Woman's Granddaughters. These works represent literature written in the traditions of Native America. While distinctly different, examination of these two texts reveals that they share commonality that speaks eloquently of the richness and diversity of Native American culture. No additional sources cited.

  • Dante's Hell and Characters

    A 5 page apper which examines where one would place various characters in classic/ancient literature in Dante’s Inferno. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Life and Works of William Faulkner

    This 7 page paper examines Faulkner's works to see if they are autobiographical; in addition, it considers his major themes, his contribution to literature and his style. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Writing Styles of Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson

    A 3 page research paper that discusses the writing styles of Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine and whether Paine's work can be considered as literature. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Reading as a Form of Resistance

    A 5 page essay that references James Scott's essay "Behind the Official Story" and Azar Nafisi's "Selections from Reading Lolita in Tehran." The writer uses the Scott text to explain how Nafisi creates a hidden transcript for her students through literature, which helps keep her female students preserve their sense of self identity in the face of patriarchal religious oppression. No additional source cited. The bibliographical references for the two essays is incomplete.

  • The World of Work

    This 3 page paper uses two works of literature to comment on the way in which work can destroy a person; in one ("Hazel tells LaVerne"), the lack of self-esteem leads a woman to miss a great opportunity; in the other ("A&P"), a manager's slavish devotion to "the rules" costs him a good employee. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Pushkin/Moor of Peter the Great

    A 10 page research paper/essay that examines an incomplete work by Alexandr Sergeyevitch Pushkin (1799-1837), a "founding father" of Russian literature. In 1827, Pushkin began, but never completed, a novel based on the life of his African ancestor and his relationship to Peter the Great entitled "The Moor of Peter the Great." The writer explores Pushkin's portrayal of both the Tsar and his ancestor and relates this to why Pushkin might not have finished this novel. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Bible, Koran, And Divine Comedy

    A 5 page paper. Each work is discussed separately in terms of their contribution to modern society. The influence and impact of the Bible itself can be found across life from culture to law to literature and so on. The contribution of the Koran itself is more difficult to determine although many individual Muslims contributed significantly to areas like medicine, math and architecture. Dante's Divine Comedy greatly influenced several different areas of life. The writer comments on which book contributed the most and why. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Avi's Don't You Know There is a War On?

    A 3 page review of the book by Avi recounting the experiences and impressions of a fifth grade protagonist (Howie Crispers) during a critical week in March 1943. World War II is raging in Europe and America has pitched herself full fervor into the war effort. From a fifth Grader’s perspective, however, the war has many personal implications as well. Not only must he juggle his failing math grades, a principal whom he believes to be a Nazi spy, and the emotional turmoil surrounding the death of his best friend’s father and the eventual loss of that friend when he moves away, Howie Crispers must learn to deal with his obsession with one of his teachers. The author of this paper unveils this fictional story upon the historical basis of how World War II affected our country on the home front. No additional sources are listed.

  • The Gods Will Have Blood by Anatole France

    5 pages in length. Evariste Gamelin, Parisian painter and student of Jacques Louis David, leads readers on a climb up the social ladder that begins with good intentions yet ends with overwhelming oppression and death. Gamelin's myopic idealism serves to crush the very purpose for which he lived his life prior to the Revolution; as soon as he realized the imminence of war, he was first to display his loyalty to the cause – no matter if that cause would ultimately cost thousands of innocent lives. Before becoming the monstrous magistrate of the Revolutionary Tribunal, Gamelin sports a decidedly more humane and compassionate persona, even to such an extent of providing a hungry mother and child with a pittance of bread. Once swept up on the frenzy of battle, however, he completely loses touch with his previous self and metamorphoses into an outright killer who has no regard for human life. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Analytical Writing in Increase Mather and John Easton's Versions of the Death of John Sassamon

    This is a 4 page paper which compares and contrast the writings of John Easton and Increase Mather. There is no bibliography.

  • 'Drink My [Red] Blood' by Richard Matheson

    A 3 page analysis of the theme, setting, character, and symbolism. No additional sources are used.

  • Psychology of Characters in The Iliad

    A 7 page paper which examines the psychology of the characters in Homer’s The Iliad. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Freudian Psychology and Ghosts by Henrik Ibsen

    A 3 page paper which examines the parallels that exist between Henrik Ibsen’s “Ghosts” and Freudian concepts. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • If Shakespeare Wrote Science Fiction, Ariel Would Use a Transporter

    This 4 page paper discusses five short science fiction stories and what it is about each of them that classifies them as being in that genre. It also suggests ways in which Shakespeare could use science fiction techniques and themes to rewrite his play “The Tempest” as a screenplay for Spielberg to direct. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • H.G. Bissinger's Friday Night Lights A Town, a Team, a Dream

    A 5 page discussion of the underlying philosophy of win-win at any costs which author Bissinger exposes has resulted in significant social problems in Odessa Texas, the home of the Permian Panthers. At the same time, however, this philosophy is not unique to Odessa. It permeates high school sports across the nation and has the potential for phenomenal societal costs. No additional sources are listed.

  • Analysis: “The Sun Also Rises”

    This 6 page paper analyzes the themes of gender and sports in Hemingway’s novel “The Sun Also Rises.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Death According to Mitch Albom

    A 4 page research paper on the writing of Mitch Albom, famous sports columnist for the Detroit Free Press. The writer discusses the metaphysical side of Albom, which is evident in his best seller Tuesdays with Morrie, which is compared with other writing. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Fried Green Tomatoes and Relationship Psychology

    A 6 page paper which examines how the characters relate to each other in terms of connections, relational functioning, mutuality, interpersonal dynamics, and motivation. No additional sources are used.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Psychological Conditions

    A 10 page analysis of Robert Louis Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" as it relates to psychological conditions. Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • "The Way of a Ship"

    This 3 page paper takes its inspiration from the novel "The Way of a Ship" by Derek Lundy to explore the ocean conditions around Cape Horn. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Water Appeal in Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 5 page paper looking at the motifs of ocean and river in these two works by Kate Chopin and Mark Twain, respectively. The paper traces these motifs through the two novels, and suggests symbolic explanations for their tremendous power. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • The Environmental Writer Alice Walker

    15 pages in length. When one thinks of an environmental writer, the first thing that comes to mind is one whose prose sing the praises of trees, animals, the ocean along with the rest of the natural world. While that is the case in many instances of environmental writing, there is also another facet of this particular literary approach that addresses the environmental capacity of social issues, not the least of which includes racial and gender injustice. Alice Walker, considered to be one of the most identifiable of all environmental writers, gleans her environmental prose from a combination of personal experience and historical circumstances that have served to compromise the very nature of equitable existence between and among the races. Moreover, the way in which she employs a certain type of character to compensate for this gross lack of environmental equity speaks to the author's intrinsic desire to revise the entire premise of racial relations much the same way a writer submits revisions to a literary work-in-progress. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Purity, Childhood, and Sexuality in Colette's The Pure and The Impure and Andre Gide's The Counterfeiters

    5 pages in length. The writer discusses how childhood, purity and sexuality play integral roles in both books. No additional sources cited.

  • Terry Kay's To Dance with the White Dog

    This paper discusses the book by Southern writer, Terry Kay. Issues of psychology, death, dying, process of aging, as well as parallels between aging as an adult and aging as a child are drawn. Synopsis included, as well as theme analysis. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Female Psychology in the Plays of Tirso de Molina

    A 14 page research paper that focuses on female characterization in the plays of Tirso de Molina (1572-1648), a playwright during the Golden Age of Spanish theatre. Examination of a variety of Tirso's plays demonstrates that--in regards to his portrayal of female characters--he was limited by the cultural standards in which he lived. In other words, women in Tirso's plays are largely relegated to subsidiary roles, which substantiate the prominence and importance of men as the pivotal focus around which everything in Spanish society revolved. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The Sane Positivist A Biography of Edward L. Thorndike by Geraldine Joncich

    8 pages in length. Edward Lee Thorndike applied his vast knowledge to several areas of psychology, including learning theory, applied psychology and mental measurement. His primary influence was William James; in turn, his lifetime achievements proved to influence the likes of B.F. Skinner and John B. Watson. Thorndike's accomplishments, which were fundamentally based in animal psychology, are readily chronicled in Geraldine Joncich's "The Sane Positivist: A Biography Of Edward L. Thorndike." Joncich covers every aspect of Thorndike's life and career as it relates to the field of psychology, effectively supplying the reader with the opportunity to gain a much more comprehensive perspective of this scientifically influential man. No additional sources cited.

  • Illness and Culture in How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent by Julia Alvarez

    A 7 page research paper that addresses the problems that can be encountered for a health care practitioner in dealing with Hispanic clients. The writer draws on Julia Alvarez's novel How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent in applying social psychology concepts pertaining to culture. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Graham Greene's The Destructors and D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner'

    A paper which compares and constrasts these two stories, with particular reference to the psychology of the main characters, the dynamics of the relationships which they establish with others, and the underlying tragic themes of the two narratives. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Shell Game

    This 3 page paper discusses the narrator, and the psychology of Chekhov’s short story “The Man in a Shell.” Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Hunters in the Snow by Tobias Wolff and Characterization

    This 6 page paper discusses the characterizations of Tobias Wolff in his short story: Hunters in the Snow. Characters analyzed for symbolism, psychology, and function. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literary Analysis of William Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily'

    This 4 page paper discusses the various aspects of Faulkner's short story, A Rose for Emily. Symbolism, character psychology, setting, and quotes included. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • A Severed Head by Iris Murdoch

    A 3 page analysis of Iris Murdoch's novel, A Severed Head. In this work, the main character, Martin Lynch-Gibbon, experiences a progression of revelations that compel him to an new awareness of the realities that make up his life. Throughout the book, Murdoch combines the elements of her narration with Freudian psychology, which aids her in portraying Martin's movement from the unconscious to an awareness of reality. No additional sources cited.

  • The Reality of Ligeia

    This 7 page paper analyzes the theme of premature burial in Poe’s short story Ligeia, as well as discussing how it relates to real-world psychology. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Madame Butterfly and Cultural Context

    This 7 page paper considers the issues of gender, colonization and human psychology from the play of David Henry Hwang, M. Butterfly. This paper parallels the Pucinni opera, but changes the outcome to reflect changed perceptions of East/West politics. Examples from the text and cited. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • An Analysis of The Creature in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    This 6 page paper provides an overview of the themes and impact of the Monster's story in the larger novel Frankenstein. In the center of Mary Shelley's novel, the Monster provides an insightful narrative that tells of his experiences after being created by Victor Frankenstein, a narrative that relates his process of learning about his surroundings, language and human emotion. This narrative provides a significant view of the psychology of human development, underscores the problems of creating life using technology, and substantiates the view of the internal conflicts and misperceptions of the Monster pertinent to the defense of his actions. No additional sources cited.

  • Blue Sky Dream by David Beers

    A 5 page analysis of the book Blue Sky Dream by David Beers. In this book, Beers offers his readers an unusual combination of personal memoir and commentary on the psychology behind the Cold War. This unusual perspective is half autobiography, half political commentary. Beers pictures his family as part of the 'Blue Sky Tribe.' This is the term that Beers uses to describe the specific lifestyle of his own family as part of the aerospace industry, and also the optimistic perspective of American culture in the decades following World War II. No additional sources cited.

  • 2 Versions of 'To Build a Fire' by Jack London

    A 12 page essay that discusses both versions of London's most famous short story. The earliest version, published in 1902, appeared in Youth's Companion and was written for a juvenile audience. London produced a second version of the story in 1908 and it was published in The Century Magazine. The second version of the story is famous as London's best work and is clearly for an adult audience. While the stories are different in both style and content, due to their intended audiences, both delve heavily into the psychological makeup of their protagonists and, in each, London describes the protagonist's perception in relating each man's fate. In so doing, London offers clear and perceptive insight into the psychology of risk-taking behavior for a young and older man, showing both the similarities and the differences in their perception of a dire situation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The God of Small Things and Sexual Transgression's Dark Reality Symbolism

    This 3 page paper discusses this story and how sexual transgression sybolizes a very dark reality. Because two characters in this story who are of different castes have an affair, they are doomed to a series of ramifications based on the fear of society. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Theme of Sexuality in Works by Sophocles, William Shakespeare, and Toni Morrison

    A 10 page essay that contrasts and compares Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's Hamlet and Morrison's The Bluest Eye. The writer argues that while human society changes, human nature does not and that these works are remarkably consistent in the manner in which they present parental obligation and the hazards of coming of age. Examination of these works shows that each of these authors considers this period to be thwart with peril and that this is particularly true when parents abdicate their responsibility to oversee this process, which includes guiding and protecting their children. No additional sources cited.

  • Homosexuality in the Works of Oscar Wilde

    7 pages in length. Did Oscar Wilde's homosexual tendencies provide the author with a hidden theme throughout his works? Some have argued that the author's anxieties with regard to his own homosexuality represents a subtle but obvious enough underlying theme. Although the characters in Oscar Wilde's stories are all in heterosexual relationships, critics contend that there exists an undercurrent of homosexual desire between and among the main characters. They cite that in many of his works, exposure of a secret sin or indiscretion and consequent disgrace is central in design, clearly symbolizing the author's penchant toward homosexuality throughout his literary creations. The writer discusses how one only needs to peruse the myriad pages of Wilde's works in order to ascertain the truth: there is no homosexual reference, hidden or otherwise. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Dracula by Bram Stoker and the Themes of Sexuality and Perversity

    A 4 page paper which examines how Stoker’s use of character doubles, repetition of events, and recurring images help to underscore the theme of boundary crossing and blurring of opposites that allow for moral distinctions, with the emphasis on sexuality/perversity. No additional sources are used.

  • Sexuality in the Work of Crane and Wharton

    A 3 page paper which compares sexuality in Stephen Crane’s novel Maggie and Edith Wharton’s novel Summer. No additional sources cited.

  • Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison and Music

    This 7 page paper discusses why music is such an integral part of Ralph Ellison’s classic novel. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Sexual Behavior in "The Godfather"

    This 7 page paper discusses the animalistic nature of sex acts in Mario Puzo's novel "The Godfather." Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • William Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily' and Society's Views on Sexuality

    A 3 page essay that discusses the societal context of William Faulkner's short story, "A Rose for Emily." In this story, Faulkner paints a complex psychological portrait not only of a Southern woman who is caught between conflicting social mores and her own desires, but he also shows the sociological complexity of the small Southern town in which she lived. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Sexuality and Language in Candide by Voltaire

    This 5 page essay report discusses the relationship between language and sexuality in Candide, as well as pointing out how those elements led to the comic aspects of Voltaire’s story. The connection between language and sexuality in Candide is similar to that of the relationship between Candide and the many characters he encounters throughout his adventures. His gentle and “candid” spirit regularly is brought up short in comparison to the far more worldly people he meets. No bibliography.

  • Justifying Banning Books for Children That Feature Homosexual Parents

    A 9 page contention that homosexual parenting units are incapable of providing the parental guidance needed by heterosexual children. The author contends, therefore, that the tendency to ban children’s books depicting homosexual parenting units is a just one. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Female Sexuality in House of Bernarda Alba

    A 3 page essay on Federico Garcia Lorca’s play “The House of Bernarda Alba,” which is part of a trilogy in which each play expresses the way that women were “crushed by Spanish customs and social life” during the early twentieth century (Jones and Jones 13). In Bernarda Alba, the cast is virtually all women, as there is only one brief appearance by a male. In this play, Garcia Lorca uses the theme of suppressed sexuality to underscore the corrosive nature of Spanish cultural expectations towards women. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Homosexuality in Le Fanu's Carmilla and Wilde's Dorian Gray

    This 7 page paper discusses the homosexual themes in Le Fanu's Carmilla and Wilde's Dorian Gray. Examples given. Quotes cited from texts. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literary Self Determination in Women and Sexuality

    A 9 page paper showing the connection between these two issues, as demonstrated in the works of Aristophanes, Plato, Dante, and Shakespeare (Lysistrata, The Apology, The Inferno, and The Tempest, respectively). The paper asserts that Western literature first mocked or dismissed the sexual expression of female self-determination, later turned it into a sin, and finally transformed it into a social gaffe, but until recently still continued to maintain that its suppression was not wrong. Bibliography lists five sources.

  • Musical Shakespeare

    A 5 page paper which examines the whether or not the musical works of Verdi's 'Macbeth' and 'Otello' ('Othello'), Mendelssohn's incidental music for 'A Midsummer Night's Dream,' Tchaikovsky's fantasy overture and incidental music for 'Hamlet,' and Cole Porter's 1948 musical, 'Kiss Me, Kate' (based on 'The Taming of the Shrew') capture the quality and mood of the Shakespeare plays which inspired them, or merely echo their plots. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Short Storie Elements in Works by John Updike, Flannery O'Connor, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, Mark Twain, and Nathaniel Hawthorne

    This is a 6 page paper discussing elements with the short stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne (Rappaccini’s Daughter), Mark Twain (The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg), William Faulkner (Barn Burning), Willa Cather (Paul’s Case), Flannery O’Connor (The Displaced Person), and John Updike (The Music School). The sections each deal with two elements within the stories: for “Rappaccini’s Daughter” the issues discussed are when Rappaccini’s plans for Giovanni become apparent, and why Giovanni expresses such hatred for Beatrice at the end of the story; for “The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg” the issues discussed are what weaknesses the stranger wishes to exploit in the town, and what kind of family quarrels ensue; in “Barn Burning”, the relationship between the boy and his father are discussed in addition to the conflicting feelings the boy has for his father; in “Paul’s Case”, Paul’s judgment of art is discussed along with the events which lead him to leave; “Displaced Persons” deals with why Mrs. McIntyre changes her mind about Mr. Guizac and whether or not Guizac’s death was an accident; finally, in “The Music School”, the character of Albert Schweigen is discussed and why he lives the music school. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'The Poisonwood Bible' by Barbara Kingsolver and a Responsibility Letter

    A 6 page creative essay in letter form which examines what responsibility (if any) do individuals have to reach out to cultures and other individuals that are foreign to them and what responsibility does the United States and its citizens have to the world community, citing passages from “The Poisonwood Bible” to support the argued thesis. No additional sources are used.

  • Characters from The Bible, The Odyssey and Tale of the Genji

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts characters from all of these books, and examines their uniting characteristics. Although these stories vary greatly in terms of content, there are universal themes apparent in them all which serve to connect them. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Different Interpretations of Biblical Events Lord Byron's View of the Story of Cain and Abel

    This 4 page paper discusses and compares the Holy Bible's Genesis to Byron's depiction of the events of Genesis. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Piety, the Bible, Sophocles, and Plato

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares Plato's Euthyphro, Sophocles' Oedipus and the Book of Genesis, chapter 22. The writer points out that all of these works concern the perspective of ancient peoples on issues of piety, justice and the manner in which these issues intersect with religion. Examination of these texts shows that Sophocles and the author of Genesis agree that divine authority demands and deserves unquestioning obedience. However, Plato, in representing the philosophy of Socrates, presents a more ambiguous picture that emphasizes the unreliability of a purely religious foundation for issues of justice. Analysis of these positions shows that Plato's stance in Euthyphro is the most logical-- and just-- by modern standards. No additional sources cited.

  • Satan Imagery in 'Paradise Lost' by John Milton and The Bible

    An 8 page paper which compares and contrasts how these two literary works portray evil. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 4 Essays, Antigone, Bible Verses

    A 5 page research paper that consists of 4 separate 1.25 pages papers. Two are on Bible verses, one on Sophocles’ Antigone and 1 on a poem by Sappho. Each paper lists 3 sources in the bibliography.

  • Role of Faith/Cry, the Beloved Country

    A 3 page essay that discusses the role of faith in Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton. The true faith of protagonist Stephen Kumalo is contrasted briefly against the self-serving "faith" of Nathan Price in Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible. No additional sources cited.

  • Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Reservation Blues

    A 14 page essay that discusses James W. Johnson's The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man and in Sherman Alexie's Reservation Blues, which are novels in which these authors address issues of race and identity as these subjects pertain to the identities of the main characters and also to the nature of racism, which is interwoven within the warp and weave of current American culture and within its history. In each novel, the authors relate these issues to music and musical expression by exploring the theme that music is both indicative of personal identity, but also an expression of culture, and, therefore, a possible means for bridging the chasms that exist between races. No additional sources cited.

  • Harlem's Poet Laureate Langston Hughes

    A 5 page research paper that examines the life an career of Langston Hughes. The writer, in particular, regards those elements in Hughes' life that influenced his writing, such as black music. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Blues of the African-American Experience

    In ten pages this paper examines how the literary artistry of Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston represented the uniqueness of the African-American experience through their stylistic interpretations of blues music. Seven sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • Blues and James Baldwin’s Short Story “Sonny’s Blues”

    In three pages this thematic analysis of James Baldwin’s ‘Sonny’s Blues’ focuses on the symbolic significance of ‘the blues’ and what the color and the music represent throughout the story. Four sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Blues Music and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

    A 5 page paper which examines the power of music, the blues, in Toni Morrison’s “The Bluest Eye.” Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea and Symbolism

    Symbolism in “The Old Man and the Sea”: This 5-page essay examines the novella “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway, while exploring some of its many intrinsic examples of symbolism. Whatever symbolic meaning is the ‘true’ Hemingway meaning of Santiago, (and they may all be true) the quality of this story is that of poetry rather than prose, and the music of its narrative language is the indefinable essence of its dignity. Bibliography lists 3 sources. SNMansea.doc

  • Pain and Healing in Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin

    A 5 page examination of James Baldwin's short story Sonny's Blues. The writer examines Baldwins use of foreshadowing and the metaphors of light, darkness and ice and how music seems to be the healing element in the story. No additonal sources cited.

  • Italian Poet Giuseppe Ungaretti

    A 7 page overview of the work of Italian poet Giuseppe Ungaretti. This paper emphasizes the varied cultural influences which undoubtedly shaped Ungaretti’s style. Noted for his use of few and very carefully chosen words, Ungaretti could accurately be described as a literary minimalist and exemplary of the hermetic movement. Like the French symbolists, he looked at poetry much as one looks at music. Even single words, had musical potential and tremendous power. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Music and Brotherly Love in Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin

    A 5 page research paper that analyzes James Baldwin's short story Sonny's Blues. The writer contrasts the character of two brothers, one of whom, Sonny, is a musician who has recently been released from prison for possession of heroin. The narrator comes to understand his brother through his music. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Oedipus Rex, the Book of Genesis, and Destiny

    A 4 page paper which discusses how destiny plays a part in the Book of Genesis in the Bible and in the classic Oedipus Rex. No additional sources cited.

  • Themes of Good and Evil in Stowe's Novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin

    An 11 page paper which examines the concept of good and evil within the context of similarities between Uncle Tom and Jesus Christ and other parallels between the text and the Bible, (8.25 pp. + 3/4 pg. outline). Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Barbara Kingsolver's Pigs in Heaven

    5 pages. Best known for her best-selling book The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver has woven another intricate tale with sympathetic and realistic characters that have an interesting story to tell. Pigs in Heaven is a book steeped in the tradition of the Cherokee Nation, and emphasizes the importance of children maintaining a connection with their culture and the roots of their history. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Chaucer, St. Luke, Aristophanes and Their View of Social Issues

    This 3 page paper discusses social issues as explored in the Bible, Chaucer and ancient Greek comedy. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Gilgamesh and Job

    A 3 page discussion of Gilgamesh, in the Epic of Gilgamesh, and Job, in the Book of Job from the Bible are heroic figures. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Search for Jon Winthrop in The Puritan Dilemma

    A 10 page paper discussing the examination of a concluding statement of the author: '...the broader vision that Winthrop stood for could never be wholly subdued. No Puritan could be a Puritan and remain untouched by it, for it arose out of the central Puritan dilemma, the problem of doing right in a world that does wrong.' The paper examines that Puritan dilemma, particularly in the light of Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson, with emphasis on the personal searches of John Winthrop. All references to the Bible are NIV. No other sources cited.

  • The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

    A 5 page essay that examines the principal theme of Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, as it is suggested by the title. At the beginning of his novel The Sun Also Rises (1926), Ernest Hemingway includes an epigraph that consists of two quotations. The first is from Gertrude Stein, an avant-garde American poet who was the emotional center of the group of expatriate American writers living in Paris during the 1920s. This quote describes the generation that came of age during World War I as a "lost generation." The horror of the war had caused this group of young people to lose faith in traditional values, leaving them adrift, without a center, in the fluctuating current of modernism. But also included in the epigraph is a quote from the Bible, from Ecclesiastes, which states that the world endures and the sun continues to rise, which suggests that time and nature will eventually provide a new generation and new hope. Examination of this novel shows that both themes, hopelessness and the hope of rejuvenation, are integral to the structure of the text as a whole. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Interpretation Of Claims Made In "The Da Vinci Code"

    10 pages in length. A fictional story based within a factual premise is not typically an alarming dichotomy within the literary world, however, when the topic at hand is religion - more precisely the Bible's legitimacy and accuracy - the coupling elicits a tremendous chorus of disapproval particularly when the purported "truth" is collectively argued to be the author's own fabrications. Even more infuriating to the truly pious, however, is how Dan Brown – author of the highly criticized The Da Vinci Code – maintains through the most blistering accusations of intentional falsehood that his fact-finding research he performed for the story uncovered these valid truths. The extent to which Brown's assertions have reverberated throughout the global religious community is both grand and far-reaching; that the author stands firm upon his convictions of fact speaks to the ongoing debates as to whether Brown actually believes his own lies or if he is merely perpetuating them for the benefit of publicity. Despite the reason, Brown continues to stir the flames of heresy where any God-fearing Christian is concerned. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Critical Reading of a Passage from Chuck Palahniuk's Fight Club

    This 2.5 page paper focuses on one passage in this book by Chuck Palahniuk. The narrator has just been beaten in a fight, he and Tyler can see his image in the blood on the floor. This paper is an interpretation of this scene based on the Bible. The writer offers an analogy of the image of the narrator and Veronica's veil. Veronica was the woman who wiped Christ's face at Cavalry. The writer also provides an analogy between the rules of the club and the Ten Commandments. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • William Bradford and Captain John Smith as Examples of American Colonial Writers

    This is a 5 page paper comparing the writers Captain John Smith and William Bradford. Early colonial American writers were known for their optimistic look at the new world and described America as not only the new world but as pure, virgin and a place for opportunity and dreams. Their writings reflected the colonist view away from the restrictions of British society. Captain John Smith was considered one of the first historians ever to document the colonists’ experiences in his writings about his time at Jamestown and his travels throughout New England. Using a fairly simple and open narrative, he provided detailed maps and descriptions of the areas in addition to adventurous tales of his own and others. William Bradford who was one of the original arrivals in Plymouth on the Mayflower also wrote of his experiences in the new world but his text was based largely on his Puritan faith and compared their quest heavily to that of Paul’s in the Bible. Despite Bradford’s more sober style of writing, he also saw the new world as a land of opportunity as did Smith and the other colonists. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Medieval Theology in Dulcitius

    An 8 page research paper/essay on this medieval play. From a modern perspective, medieval drama is interpreted by the average person as being incredibly sexist and somewhat perverse in its intense focus on tortures that Christian martyrs, who are usually beautiful maidens, undergo for their faith. In her analysis of the plays of Hrotsvit, Colleen D. Richmond, assistant professor of writing and literature at George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon, argues that Hrotsvit's intentions are to help women redefine themselves and find empowerment within the framework of Christianity that allows them to subvert the domination of patriarchy. In other words, when viewed from a scholarly perspective, "Dulcitius," as well as the rest of Hrotsvit's plays, can be perceived in terms of constituting both social protest and medieval feminism. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'Good Country People' by Flannery O'Connor and Theology

    A 4 page paper which examines Flannery O’Connor’s story “Good Country People” and discusses the theology within as it applies to the character of Joy/Hulga. No additional sources cited.

  • A Historical and Theological View of Urban Renewal in Lupton's "Renewing the City"

    This is a 7 page paper that provides an overview of Lupton's "Renewing the City." The correlations between the biblical book of Nehemiah and contemporary urban planning methods is explored. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Theology of Herman Melville in his Writings

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  • Symbolism in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"

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