Research Papers on All Literature

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

  • Adultery in The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    5 pages in length. Intolerance towards acts of adultery was alive and well, historically, during the period of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. The sexual repression and hypocrisy that reigned during the seventeenth century -- as compared with the more relaxed attitudes of today -- was evident within the Puritan culture. The writer addresses such sexual imprisonment as it relates to the mentality of that time. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Society and the Individual in The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

    A 5 page paper showing how the theme of the individual in society is portrayed within William Faulkner's novel. The paper points out that the characteristics of the individual family members illustrate the varying ways in which our search for self-worth in society at large can go awry. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Water Appeal in Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 5 page paper looking at the motifs of ocean and river in these two works by Kate Chopin and Mark Twain, respectively. The paper traces these motifs through the two novels, and suggests symbolic explanations for their tremendous power. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Water Appeal in Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 5 page paper looking at the motifs of ocean and river in these two works by Kate Chopin and Mark Twain, respectively. The paper traces these motifs through the two novels, and suggests symbolic explanations for their tremendous power. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Captain Ahab Character in Moby Dick by Herman Melville

    A 5 page discussion of how Captain Ahab challenges the very order of creation in his pursuit of Moby Dick. No additional sources cited.

  • Sin in Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple and Herman Melville's Pierre

    A 7 page paper looking at Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple and Herman Melville's Pierre in terms of their emphasis on sin and death. The paper concludes that both novels end so tragically because eighteenth and nineteenth-century society could not accept any other retribution for turning one's back on society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Beautiful and the Damned by F. Scott Fitgerald

    This 4 page report discusses 'The Beautiful and the Damned,' F. Scott Fitzgerald's second novel written in 1922. The writer's primary focus is on how this novel, like 'The Great Gatsby,' serves as an example of the American dream gone wrong. Bibliography lists only the book itself as a source.

  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

    A 6 page paper on this author and his novel 'Of Mice and Men.' The writer examines the influences in Steinbeck's life, the major themes, critical appeal, and the book's enduring value. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Arthurian Cycle Theme in Tortilla Flat by John Steinbeck

    10 pages in length. In one of John Steinbeck's more worldly creations, Tortilla Flat adopts a decidedly Arthurian theme that reflects a significant Camelot-esque appeal. Monterey, California, is the site of this modern day Camelot, however, replete with all the elements typically related to King Arthur and his court: lust, temptation, emotion, honor and compelling action. Danny, Pillon, Pablo, Big Jog Portagee, Jesus Maria Corcoran and the old Pirate -- also known as the paisanos -- help tell the tale that surrounds the Arthurian cycle Steinbeck so cleverly weaves within the story. The writer discusses the Arthurian cycle as it relates to Tortilla Flat. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Insanity and Sexual Hysteria in Turn of the Screw by Henry James

    A 6 page paper that provides an overview of the elements of James' story that culminate in the depiction of the governess as a women fundamentally driven by her sexual identification and actions, that ultimately end in her insanity. Bibliography lists 6 additional sources.

  • Governess in Turn of the Screw by Henry James

    5 pages in length. When asking the question of whether the governess in Henry James' Turn Of The Screw was truly crazy or merely a victim of ghostly pranks, one has to establish a basis for such an answer. Did she display consistent acts of lunacy in her daily activities? Was she construed as deranged by those with whom she regularly came in contact? The answer is no in both instances. The writer discusses how the governess was quite sane yet still routinely visualized apparitions. No additional sources cited.

  • The Mask by Fumiko Enchi, Turn of the Screw by Henry James, and Gender

    In this 4 page essay, comparisons are made concerning depictions of culture and power (as they relate to gender and feminity) in 'Turn Of The Screw' and 'The Mask.' The first of these suggests that a man can also be the object of a mastering look and that the association of that position with the woman is conventional. The latter work illustrates harsh conditions under which Japanese women had to live in their own society and relevant comparisons are made. No other sources are cited.

  • Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Henry James' Turn of the Screw and Evil

    An 8 page paper discussing how Henry James and Joseph Conrad go about creating their atmospheres of evil in these novels, and what in fact they believe evil to be. The paper concludes that for both authors evil is the presence of something concretely malefficient, not just the absence of something abstractly good. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Relationships, Obstacles, and the Race in White Fang by Jack London

    A 9 page paper describing the major obstacle that primary characters face in order to win the race--their own personal relationship. London presents the reader with a primary statement on man and nature and uses a sled dog race as the vehicle to combine the two in a single goal. Although they also face a number of real difficulties, from the wear and tear of the environment to the competitors, the most difficult obstacle Weedon and White Fang must over come is their own interdependency. FREE outline included. ibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Thematic Elements of 'The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman Analyzed

    A 6 page paper in which the short story 'The Yellow Wallpaper' is discussed. The writer explains the symbolism of the wallpaper to the main character, and analyzes the meaning of the story. No additional sources cited.

  • The theme of insanity in The Yellow Wallpaper

    A 6 page essay on Gilman's 'Yellow Wallpaper' in which the writer describes how the narrator is pushed gradually into a state of madness by her husband, John. Her room is described as a prison and her eventual independence is remarked to have been traded in for her sanity. Quotes from the story are used to support points made. No other sources cited.

  • Self Presentation, Insecurity, and Anxiety in 'The Yellow Wallpaper' by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

    This 5 page paper considers the issues of insecurity, anxiety about her ability to write and issues surrounding self-presentation as they are defined in Charlotte Perkins Gillman's Yellow Wallpaper. This paper reflects the personal elements that are Gilman's in this work and defines the link between Gilman's characterization of the wife and her own personal experiences as they demonstrate her inherent struggles and her own insecurity in the process of asserting her feminist ideologies. No additional sources cited.

  • Suppressed Dialogue in 'The Yellow Wallpaper' by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

    A 5 page paper looking at Charlotte Perkins Gilman's classic short story in terms of what it deliberately does not say. The paper asserts that Gilman's astonishing use of hallucinogenic imagery and symbol conveys the meaning that her protagonist is unable to express. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • J.D. Salinger's Writings

    8 pages in length. The author discusses Catcher in the Rye, 'A Perfect Day for Bananafish', and 'Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut' In these stories Salinger portrays a sense of hopelessness in his choice of main characters. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Feminist Symbolism in the Play Trifles by Susan Glaspell

    An 8 page paper that argues that Glaspell uses name, bird/birdcage and quilt symbolism to delineate opposing identities between men and women, and freedom of the bird based on what men perceive as 'trifles' and women consider a part of their identity. The paper posits that Glaspell's overall goal was a call to arms for the suffrage movement of her times, but also a wake-up call for men to the plight of women. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Easy Rawlins in Devil in a Blue Dress by Walter Moseley

    This 5 page paper considers the character of Easy Rawlins presented in Walter Mosley's novel Devil in a Blue Dress and relates the issue of race, especially Easy's blackness, as it impacts his role as a private eye. This paper considers the sometimes conflicting view of Easy Rawlins and the impact for the novel as a whole. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Edith Wharton's Life, Writings, and Men

    A 5 page paper analyzing the relationship of the men in Edith Wharton's poetry and fiction to the relationships she actually had in her life. The paper determines there is a very close correspondence, and theorizes that putting so much of her personal life into her writing helped her deal with her own experience. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • An Analysis of The Creature in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    This 6 page paper provides an overview of the themes and impact of the Monster's story in the larger novel Frankenstein. In the center of Mary Shelley's novel, the Monster provides an insightful narrative that tells of his experiences after being created by Victor Frankenstein, a narrative that relates his process of learning about his surroundings, language and human emotion. This narrative provides a significant view of the psychology of human development, underscores the problems of creating life using technology, and substantiates the view of the internal conflicts and misperceptions of the Monster pertinent to the defense of his actions. No additional sources cited.

  • Anita Loos and Edith Wharton's Simple Folk

    A 16 page examination of the characterization of 'simple people' in Wharton's Summer and Anita Loos' Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. The paper concludes that simplicity for Loos implies a certain quality of mind, while for Wharton it is a quality of birth. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Communication Lacking in the Fiction of Eudora Welty

    A 5 page paper showing how lack of interpersonal communication is a common theme in Welty's short stories. The paper particularly looks at the stories Death of a Traveling Salesman, A Worn Path, Why I Live at the P.O., and The Hitch-hikers. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton Evaluated Scientifically

    A 10 page study that looks at the efficacy of Crichton's use of science. It is argued that, generally, his scientific principles are accurate, and delineates between those that are applicable and those that are not. The paper provides a report on the current discussion on cloning, DNA and Chaos Theory from both a scientific viewpoint and from the viewpoints represented by Henry Wu (corporate), Ian Malcolm (chaos theory), and Alan Grant (embodiment of social protector). Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • 'Middle Passage' by Charles Johnson

    5 pages in length. The writer offers a brief overview of the book, touching upon important points the story has to make, as well as discusses significant concepts important to the overall understanding of the account. No additional sources cited.

  • David Mamet's Plays and Use of Profanity

    A 5 page paper examining the plays of this award-winning playwright, in terms of his abundant profanity. Looking closely at Edmond and Glengarry Glen Ross, the paper concludes that Mamet's characters cannot really do anything about their powerlessness; the only thing they can do with impunity is swear. Bibliography lists six sources.

  • Future Lessons in the Past Story of Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee by Dee Brown

    A 5 page overview of the events presented in Dee Brown's 1970 book 'Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee'. Discusses the viewpoints of both the whites and the Native Americans and concludes that while what happened was inexcusable, it is a lesson for the future. No additional sources cited.

  • An Analysis of Louise Erdrich's Novel, Tracks

    This 5 page paper reviews Louise Erdrich's Tracks, a 1988 novel about Chippewa Indians living in North Dakota. The book analyzes the major characters of Pauline, Nanapush, Margaret and Fleur and how their struggles reflect the overall struggle of the Native Americans to hold onto what is left of their land and their dignity. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Modernism, Postmodernism, and The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon

    A 9 page paper on Thomas Pynchon's well-known work. The writer notes that while the novel has characteristics of both modernism and postmodernism, its postmodern tendencies predominate in its strongly apocalyptic worldview. Bibliography lists 6 sources including book.

  • Robert James Waller's The Bridges of Madison County

    A 5 page paper on Robert James Waller's novel The Bridges of Madison County. Calling upon the opinions of three literary critics/ columnists, the paper argues that the book's popularity is based on sentimentality at the expense of meaning, and is symptomatic of the mental decay of our entire culture. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Yekl by Abraham Cahan

    Abraham Cahan's Yekl is discussed in this 6 page paper that focuses on the conflict within the main character himself. Several themes of this important novel are explored. No additional sources cited.

  • Joyce Carol Oates' Dark Writings

    A 6 page paper that provides an overview of the darker elements in the writings of Joyce Carol Oates. A number of her stories are used as examples to illustrate points being made. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig

    A 15 page review of the 1974 book by Robert Persig. Explores the concept of perception and how it relates to the ancient philosophy of Zen. Illuminates Persig's concern with the decline in American values and in systems such as our educational system. No additional sources are listed.

  • Life and Writings of James Fenimore Cooper

    6 pages in length. James Fenimore Cooper, the prolific author who has penned some of the most memorable literary works in American history, did not originally intend to be a writer; rather, the fact that he found his inherent ability to write was discovered quite by accident. His literary career began at the late age of thirty years old, in spite of the fact that he harbored an intense interest in reading just about everything that came his way. As time went on, Cooper focused more heartily upon his craft, as well as American issues, which served to thrust him into the literary world. The writer discusses Cooper's life and work. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Clara Wieland and Ellen Montgomery in Wieland and The Wide, Wide World

    This 7 page research paper compares and contrasts the characters of Ellen Montgomery in Susan Bogert Warner's The Wide, Wide World (1852), and Clara Wieland in Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland (1798). Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Tropic of Capricorn and Tropic of Cancer by Miller

    An 8 page comparative essay on Henry Miller's 'Tropic of Cancer' and 'Tropic of Capricorn.' The writer argues that the subject of these sexually explicit books was the real quadrangle of sex—passion, politics, boredom and death. Although he viewed the works as conscious-raising efforts, he believed his attempts would be futile. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Epistolary Novel and Fair and Tender Ladies by Lee Smith

    A 6 page paper which looks at the format of Lee Smith's Fair and Tender Ladies as series of letters, and demonstrate how the main character both reflects her culture and her own growth through her writing. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Unredeemed Captive by John Demos

    A 7 page paper reviewing John Demos' 1994 book, The Unredeemed Captive. Bibliography lists no additional sources.

  • Men and Women in the Texts In Love and Trouble and The Color Purple

    A 5 page paper discussing the relationship some of characters experience. In 'The Color Purple' the relationships defined are those of Celie and Mr._____, Andrew and Shug. In the book of short stories, 'In Love and Trouble' the relationships are those of Myrna and Ruel, Myrna and Mordecai. The differences between the males and the females expectations and outlooks in regards to their relationships is detailed. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Uncommon Man's Tragedy and Aristotle

    A 5 page paper analyzing the concept of tragedy as defined by Aristotle (and illustrated in Sophocles' Oedipus the King) and Arthur Miller's definition of the form (as described in his essay 'The Tragedy of the Common Man' and illustrated in Death of a Salesman). Bibliography lists one source.

  • The Aristotelian Tragic Form

    A 6 page paper defining classic Aristotelian form of tragedy and how it is expressed in Macbeth, Death of a Salesman, The Metamorphosis, and The Stranger. 2 source bib

  • Literary Self Determination in Women and Sexuality

    A 9 page paper showing the connection between these two issues, as demonstrated in the works of Aristophanes, Plato, Dante, and Shakespeare (Lysistrata, The Apology, The Inferno, and The Tempest, respectively). The paper asserts that Western literature first mocked or dismissed the sexual expression of female self-determination, later turned it into a sin, and finally transformed it into a social gaffe, but until recently still continued to maintain that its suppression was not wrong. Bibliography lists five sources.

  • Musical Shakespeare

    A 5 page paper which examines the whether or not the musical works of Verdi's 'Macbeth' and 'Otello' ('Othello'), Mendelssohn's incidental music for 'A Midsummer Night's Dream,' Tchaikovsky's fantasy overture and incidental music for 'Hamlet,' and Cole Porter's 1948 musical, 'Kiss Me, Kate' (based on 'The Taming of the Shrew') capture the quality and mood of the Shakespeare plays which inspired them, or merely echo their plots. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Theme of Victimization in Uncle Tom's Cabin, Redburn, and Wieland

    A 6 page paper discussing these three novels by Charles Brockton Brown, Herman Melville, and Harriet Beecher Stowe. The paper concludes that in each of these novels, the characters had a choice about whether or not they intended to be a victim -- and for better or worse, the choice transformed their lives forever. Bibliography lists the three books as sources.

  • Values and Women in The Westies by T.J. English

    A 12 page paper discussing T.J. English's nonfiction book about the famous twentieth-century Hell's Kitchen gang. It particularly looks at the women behind the scenes in the all-male gang, and analyzes the way these women reflect traditional values. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparative Literary Analysis of William Faulkner's Modernism and Toni Morrison's Postmodernism

    This 4 page research paper explores twentieth-century modernist and post-modernist literature, as reflected in the works of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison. Specifically discussed are the style and content with their works with the social, culture and philosophical context of their writings through examination of excerpts from two of their short stories, A Rose for Emily and Recitatif. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Guterson, Wharton, Grisham, and Verisimilitude

    A 6 page paper discussing the reality of the settings and details in these three novels. The paper points out that verisimilitude is very important in fiction, because only when the reader is grounded in reality can he suspend disbelief sufficiently to be drawn into the story. Bibliography lists one source.

  • Manuel Puig's Kiss of the Spider Woman and Other Works of Literature

    A 5 page paper looking at Manuel Puig's novel as a backdrop for four others: A Sincere Friendship by Clarice Lispector, The Lion by Eugeny Zamyatin, The Night Visitor by Elena Poniatowska, and China by Charles Johnson. The paper examines how in these works the human need for individual expression and moral courage influence and reinforce each other. No additional sources cited.

  • Ambiguity in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

    A 7 page essay briefly examining the life of the author of 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde' and how his life and times affected how he recast the ancient struggle between good and evil that thrives in the heart of every man. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Wild Steps of Heaven by Victor Villasenor

    A 5 page evaluation of the book, “Wild Steps of Heaven,” by Victor Villasenor. In this incredible tale of one family we see the many sides to any given family or culture. It is an incredible look into the history of a culture as well as the people of Hispanic origin. The story is full of all the qualities that make a truly great mythical story, yet the intricate details are real and potent, not fantasy and vague. Villasenor has done a superb job in describing many of the details of his family’s heritage. No additional sources cited.

  • The Enormous Radio by John Cheever

    5 pages in length. 'The Enormous Radio' by John Cheever is indicative of the prolific writer's inherent ability to pursue even the simplest of concepts. Not unlike his myriad other works, which appeal to the innermost recesses of the reader's soul, the author has a long history of reaching out and inviting his audience to experience with him the sometimes intense and often expansive sense of being that is clearly portrayed within his works. Indeed, the Enormous Radio is no exception. The writer discusses criticisms, character analysis and symbolism in relation to Cheever's novel. No additional sources cited.

  • Medieval Morality Play Mankind

    A 5 page analysis of the medieval morality play, 'Mankind.' The writer focuses on the scene in which Mischief holds 'court' as representative of the features of the play. The writer argues that this play is most significant, not for its content, but rather because it indicates the beginnings of professionalism in English drama. No additional sources listed.

  • Longitude by Dava Sobel

    A 5 page analysis of Sobel's book that gives a wider historical perspective on the significance of this fascinating story of the invention of the chronometer. First, the writer relates the essence of Sobel's account of how an uneducated woodworker, John Harrison, solved the trickiest scientific problem of his age. Then, the writer relates this both to the Enlightenment and also to the market demands of that time. No additional sources cited.

  • The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck

    4 pages in length. The objective of Pearl S. Buck in her enthralling book entitled The Good Earth is to demonstrate the inherent strength of women despite the fact that a patriarchal society has perpetually kept them oppressed. Clearly defined in the author's portrayal is that of a common bond shared between and among Chinese women with regard to their oppression. The fact that oppression has been a way of life for Chinese women is indicative of O-lan's experience as told within the pages of The Good Earth. The writer discusses the various messages addressed in Buck's The Good Earth. No additional sources cited.

  • Analysis of Narrative in the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave

    In 6 pages, the author gives an analysis of the book 'Narrative in the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave (1845).' This is the story of Frederick Douglass, a former slave. Through this narrative, the humanity of the slave, Douglass, is asserted. The narrative of Frederick Douglass tells of a chattel that was turned into a human being: a person. No source cited.

  • Irony, Plot, and Characterization of A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen

    5 pages in length. Without the inclusion of characterization, plot and irony, there would be little point in constructing any works of literature whatsoever, for these literary terms describe the very heart of a story's content. The people within a tale must have a sense of existence, which is what characterization gives to them. It is a means by which the author develops the story's characters, giving them depth, artistic representation and motives for their actions. Plot is why the whole story comes alive in the first place; without plot, a tale would merely drone on and on without purpose or direction. A story's irony is what makes it that much more intriguing, particularly in relation to the fact that irony represents an expression opposite of what the literal meaning provides. Irony can be described as an unwitting occurrence that takes the characters -- and the reader -- by complete surprise. The writer discusses characterization, plot and irony in relation to Ibsen' 'A Doll's House.' Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Sexuality and Language in Candide by Voltaire

    This 5 page essay report discusses the relationship between language and sexuality in Candide, as well as pointing out how those elements led to the comic aspects of Voltaire’s story. The connection between language and sexuality in Candide is similar to that of the relationship between Candide and the many characters he encounters throughout his adventures. His gentle and “candid” spirit regularly is brought up short in comparison to the far more worldly people he meets. No bibliography.

  • Sexuality and Language in Candide by Voltaire

    This 5 page essay report discusses the relationship between language and sexuality in Candide, as well as pointing out how those elements led to the comic aspects of Voltaire’s story. The connection between language and sexuality in Candide is similar to that of the relationship between Candide and the many characters he encounters throughout his adventures. His gentle and “candid” spirit regularly is brought up short in comparison to the far more worldly people he meets. No bibliography.

  • Hotel du Lac by Anita Brookner

    A 3 page analysis of Anita Brookner's novel Hotel du Lac. It's the rather sad tale of a 39-year-old Englishwoman with the symbolic name of 'Edith Hope' who is sent by concerned friends to sit out a scandal at small, discreet resort in Switzerland, the Hotel du Lac. The story revolves around the central question of what sort of behavior is appropriate for a woman, and how Edith handles finding her own direction and decisions regarding this particular issue. Edith must decide whether or not she will meet society's expectations or determine what expectations are appropriate on her own. No additional sources cited.

  • A Severed Head by Iris Murdoch

    A 3 page analysis of Iris Murdoch's novel, A Severed Head. In this work, the main character, Martin Lynch-Gibbon, experiences a progression of revelations that compel him to an new awareness of the realities that make up his life. Throughout the book, Murdoch combines the elements of her narration with Freudian psychology, which aids her in portraying Martin's movement from the unconscious to an awareness of reality. No additional sources cited.

  • A Severed Head by Iris Murdoch

    A 3 page analysis of Iris Murdoch's novel, A Severed Head. In this work, the main character, Martin Lynch-Gibbon, experiences a progression of revelations that compel him to an new awareness of the realities that make up his life. Throughout the book, Murdoch combines the elements of her narration with Freudian psychology, which aids her in portraying Martin's movement from the unconscious to an awareness of reality. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Sugar and Other Stories' by A.S. Byatt

    A 3 page analysis of Sugar and other Stories, a collection of short fiction by A.S. Byatt. In this collection, Byatt explores the ramifications of the boundaries of imagination, the dynamics of language and the purposes of art. This work particularly explores the relationship of between narration and word use that demonstrates the pull toward symbolic representation, while simultaneously relating to a version of reality that resists form. No additional sources cited.

  • Death in Katherine Paterson's Bridge to Terebithia and E.B. White's Charlotte's Web

    A 5 page paper looking at these two children’s books by E.B. White and Katherine Paterson, respectively, in terms of their treatment of death. The paper provides a detailed synopsis of both works, and argues that reading books such as these helps children come to terms with the presence of death in their own lives. No additional sources.

  • Arabian Nights Translation by Richard Burton

    A 5 page analysis of the Burton translation of this famous collection of Persian folktales. From the moment that the first translation of her remarkable stories appeared, the Western world has been entranced--just as much as was her king--by the stories of Shahrazad. It has been said that these stories are masterpieces of the art of storytelling and that for inventiveness and sheer entertainment value, they cannot be equaled. The writer argues that this is certainly true. No additional sources cited.

  • Women's Conventional and Unconventional Roles in My Antonia by Willa Cather

    5 pages in length. The duality of Willa Cather's portrayal of women in My Antonia represents the inherent dichotomy that exists between conventionality and unconventionality. A longstanding debate has raged ever since the author penned her account of a woman torn between traditional gender representation and that which is not considered conventional. The argument within the literary world revolves around the feminist approach, with some critics contending that Antonia represents the archetypal female who awakens to her innate functions as a woman. The writer presents a review of literary opinions in relation to how women's roles are portrayed in My Antonia. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Turning Lost Customers into Gold by Joan K. Cannie

    : An 8 page analysis of Cannie's book on how to 'mine' the lost riches represented by customers who defect to a competitor. Cannie asserts that most US companies are unaware of how many of their customers go elsewhere over the course of a year. Additionally, she argues that most firms are also unaware of what these defections generally cost in the way of lost sales and reduced annual revenue. Cannie's premise is that these losses are significant and her arguments are most persuasive. No additional sources cited.

  • Joyce Chopra's Smooth Talk Film and Joyce Carol Oates' 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'

    A 6 page paper comparing Joyce Chopra’s film “Smooth Talk”, with Joyce Carol Oates’ “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”, the short story on which the film was based. The paper argues that in allowing the protagonist to live at the end instead of being murdered as Oates implies in her story, Chopra has changed the tale’s moral. No additional sources.

  • Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg

    An 8 page analysis of the nineteenth century novel by James Hogg, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner. In this novel, the protagonist, Robert, embarks on a campaign of murder that is intended to 'do God's work' by relieving the planet of some of the wicked. Hogg takes the reader inside Robert's mind as Hogg demonstrates just how destructive such extreme belief in one's own righteousness can be. Robert is so torn apart by the implications of his Calvinist upbringing that his psyche literally splinters and he communes with a copy of himself that goes by the name of 'Gil-Martin'‹it is an evil copy. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Violence in Lord of the Flies by William Golding

    This 5 page report discusses Golding’s 1954 “Lord of the Flies” and its underlying themes of violence and fear. The story of the boys lost on a desert island serves as an allegory for the fundamental core of violence that is buried deep within every human. As the boys become increasingly polarized, the reader sees how far they have given over to the violence that is energizing them. No secondary sources listed in bibliography.

  • Soul Torn Between Mephistopheles and Gretchen in Faust by Goethe

    This 5 page report discusses Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s masterpiece “Faust” and whether or not Faust will give his soul over to God, to Gretchen or to Mephistopheles. Throughout the story, it could be resolved in a number of ways. However, what Faust never seems to realize is his fundamental helplessness in the face of powers much greater than his own. No bibliography.

  • The Garlic Ballads by Mo Yan

    A 10 page research paper that analyzes the novel The Garlic Ballads by Chinese author Mo Yan. Written in the mid-1980s, the writer argues that the political themes within this realistic and gritty look at Chinese life are an accurate reflection of the widespread corruption that is characteristic of the Chinese government. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

    A 5 page research paper on Carson's revolutionary book, which launched the US environmentalist movement. Carson warned about the negative effects of indiscriminate use of man-made chemicals, such as DDT. Her work not only launched the environmentalist movement in the US, but it also changed the perspective of a generation in the way it regards humanity's place in the natural environment. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Skin of a Lion by Michael Ondaatje and Immigration Implications

    A 6 page research paper on how Ondaatje's novel, In the Skin of a Lion, reflects the situation of immigrants and the political power structure in Canada earlier in the century. The writer argues that those at the top of society's power hierarchy during that period, from both a political and financial standpoint, were cavalier in their disregard for the welfare of this workforce, often requiring ultimate effort under unsafe conditions for limited pay, and that Ondaatje's novel reveals the life of the immigrant as it spotlights the complicated mixture of elements that characterized the conflict between majority and minority culture that are inherent to a population that is multi-ethnic in its composition. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Civilization and Savagery in the Works of Mary Rowlandson and James Fenimore Cooper

    A 5 page analysis of James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans and Mary White Rowlandson's personal narrative that tells of her capture by Narragansett Indians in a 1675 attack on Lancaster, Mass. The writer argues that both of these accounts are revealing as to how whites viewed Native Americans and how this showed the contrast between what is considered 'civilized behavior' and savagery. No additional sources cited.

  • Henry James' Daisy Miller and Realism

    A 3.5 page paper which defines the term ‘realism,’ then examines how it is used in Henry James’ 1877 novel, 'Daisy Miller,' through descriptive passages and characters. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Tim O'Brien's Novels The Things They Carried and Going After Cacciato

    A 15 page comparison between the above mentioned novels by Tim O'Brien. In these novels, O'Brien examines feelings and uncertainties that speak to the heart of being human and leave the reader thinking, rather then feeling that all their questions have been answered. O'Brien's artistry encompasses all of the nuances and pathos of the human condition, but set within a framework that coincides with the period that formed the crux of his own experience‹the Vietnam War. The writer specifically examines the novels relative to O'Brien's use of structure. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Old Age Poetic Portrayals in the Works of Jenny Joseph and Ursula Fanthorpe

    A 5 page contrast of the realities of old age and the plans we often make for our golden years in the throws of the optimism of youth. The author reviews the basic premises of these two poems, one planning outrageous behavior and excesses for her old age and the other bound by his worn out body and mind, to conclude that these two poems are as different as reality and fantasy. As disturbing as it may be to authors like Jenny Joseph, old age is not always a thing which we can plan for. In comparison, “Old Man, Old Man” by Ursula Fanthorpe is a more realistic portrayal of the way that the circumstances of old age, despite all your plans to the contrary, can catch up with you. No additional sources are listed.

  • Old Age Poetic Portrayals in the Works of Jenny Joseph and Ursula Fanthorpe

    A 5 page contrast of the realities of old age and the plans we often make for our golden years in the throws of the optimism of youth. The author reviews the basic premises of these two poems, one planning outrageous behavior and excesses for her old age and the other bound by his worn out body and mind, to conclude that these two poems are as different as reality and fantasy. As disturbing as it may be to authors like Jenny Joseph, old age is not always a thing which we can plan for. In comparison, “Old Man, Old Man” by Ursula Fanthorpe is a more realistic portrayal of the way that the circumstances of old age, despite all your plans to the contrary, can catch up with you. No additional sources are listed.

  • Literature, Film, Identity, and Travel

    An 8 page research paper that examines the connection between travel and identity construction. The writer looks specifically at Shakespeare's The Tempest, Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and Coppola's Apocalypse Now. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Animals in the Fairy Tales of The Brothers Grimm

    This 6 page essay examines the role of animals in many popular Grimm Fairy Tales. The stories examined are Cinderella, The Frog King and Little Red Riding Hood. The paper examines both the use of animals in these stories, as well as the likely symbolism that their appearance could convey. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Review of Coyote Blue

    A 5 page paper which discusses how Sam Hunter's position as successful and content indicates how good things never last when one is not truly righteous. The book is "Coyote Blue" by Christopher Moore. Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • Comparing Kate Chopin Tales 'The Story of an Hour' and 'Desiree's Baby'

    A 7 page paper which critically examines how these stories represent Chopin’s efforts to reflect her own life in her art, how they are innovative feminist critiques (such as gender stereotypes and oppression) of the social conventions that were defined and maintained by the American patriarchy. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • 'Parliament of Fowles' by Geoffrey Chaucer

    A 5 page paper that discusses the structure and thematic content of Geoffrey Chaucer's poem "Parliament of Fowles," which is one of the first Valentine's poems. The writer argues that Chaucer upholds love, but stresses that love should promote the "common profit," i.e. the common good. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Parliament of Fowles' by Geoffrey Chaucer

    A 5 page paper that discusses the structure and thematic content of Geoffrey Chaucer's poem "Parliament of Fowles," which is one of the first Valentine's poems. The writer argues that Chaucer upholds love, but stresses that love should promote the "common profit," i.e. the common good. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Principle Theme of Antigone by Sophocles

    A 5 page essay that examines the principal theme in Sophocles' Antigone, the play that continues the sage of Oedipus Rex and his progeny. The writer argues that in this play the conflict is between the loyalty that one owes family and religious precepts vs. the loyalty owed to the state. No additional sources cited.

  • Good and Bad of Human Nature as Portrayed in Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines literature from various time periods and illustrates that the nature of humans is both good and bad, though times change and the focus of mankind changes. The literature used in this discussion is "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift, "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley, and "Heart of Darkness" by William Conrad. No additional sources cited.

  • Oedipus Rex by Sophocles and Unwritten Law's Power

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of the power of unwritten law in Sophocles' play "Oedipus Rex." No additional sources cited.

  • Italian Literature and the Themes of Escape, Alienation, and Entrapment

    A 6 page paper which examines the themes of alienation, entrapment, and escape in two Italian pieces of literature. The literature examined is "The Garden of the Finzi-Contini" by Giorgio Bassani and "The Secret Diary" by Alba De Cespedes. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Edgar Allan Poe's 'Fall of the House of Usher,' Art and Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the poem "The Haunted Palace" and other literary and artistic works presented in the house in the story "The Fall of the House of Usher" by Edgar Allan Poe. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Edgar Allan Poe's 'Fall of the House of Usher,' Art and Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the poem "The Haunted Palace" and other literary and artistic works presented in the house in the story "The Fall of the House of Usher" by Edgar Allan Poe. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of John Keats' 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page review of this classic work of iterature. The author of this paper reviews some of the deeper connotations which the poem suggests. As in many of his poems, Keats’ emphasizes the specific beauty of an object or person in relation with the beauty of the setting in which that object or person existed. The most profound, and indeed heavily debated pronouncement of the poem, however, is the observation that beauty is truth. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of John Keats' 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page review of this classic work of iterature. The author of this paper reviews some of the deeper connotations which the poem suggests. As in many of his poems, Keats’ emphasizes the specific beauty of an object or person in relation with the beauty of the setting in which that object or person existed. The most profound, and indeed heavily debated pronouncement of the poem, however, is the observation that beauty is truth. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 4 Brief Literature Essays

    A 10 page research paper that is composed of 4 short essays (roughly 2.5 pages each) on works by J.D. Salinger, Kate Chopin, Thomas Hardy, Saul Bellow and Annie Proulx. Works discussed include: Chopin, The Awakening; J.D. Salinger, For Esme with Love and Squalor, De Daumier-Smith's Blue Period, A Perfect Day for Bananafish; Hardy's On the Western Circuit; Proulx's The Shipping News, and Bellow's Something to Remember Me By. No additional sources cited.

  • Contemporary Chinese Poetry's Thematic and Linguistic Structure

    An 11 page discussion of the linguistic and thematic structure of modern Chinese poetry. Analyzes the poem “Into the Mountains” by Yang Mu to present examples of metaphor, simile, comparison, and personification. This paper emphasizes that essentially modern Chinese poetry relies on the same use of semantics as do Western forms of poetry. Other considerations enter the picture, however, when these poems are translated into English. In this instance, the translator has essentially as much power as the poet in changing subtle components of a poem with the manipulation of the English words which he uses to convey the meaning. While it is useful to analyze the semantics of modern Chinese poetry from an operative structure standpoint therefore, it is perhaps even more useful to analyze this poetry from a thematic standpoint. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature and Freedom Themes

    This 5 page paper examines the theme of freedom, and looks at authenticity, in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Narrative of Frederick Douglass and Kate Chopin's The Awakening. Different types of freedom are explored. The works are compared and contrasted. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Romantic Emotion and the Differences Between Emily Dickinson and John Keats

    A 6 page contention that feeling and emotion are each integral components of the Romanticist literary style. This style attempt to move its reader through emotion and description, not necessarily realism. While other styles of literature often resort to historical fact or even scientific fact, Romanticism depends of its ability to influence the deep emotional and perceptual resources of its audience. This paper presents the contrast which exists between Emily Dickinson and John Keats in the manner in which they elicit this emotion. While Dickinson concentrates on emotion as it relates to human feelings, Keats is noted for his ability to bring to life the emotion which can be encased in even inanimate objects.

  • Mexican Literature Comparison Victor Valle's Recipe of Memory Five Generations of Mexican Cuisine and Ruben Martinez's Crossing Over A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail

    A 5 page overview of the content of these two books and the differences in presentational style elected by each author. The author of this paper emphasizes that Mexican literature offers a wide gamut of style and subject matter. Of particular interest is the way different writers chose to present their information. Some chose a discursive appropriation while others use formal appropriation. The approach elected by Valle falls into the latter category while that of Martinez falls into the former. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Herakles Presentation by Playwrights and Artists

    This 14 page paper examines the background of the Greek god Herakles and how this mythalogical figure is depicted in art. Additionally, this paper examines whether various pieces of art depicting Herakles depict a consistant image.

  • 'The Iliad' and the Homeric Hero

    This tutorial paper helps lead the student through two questions: how does a hero in this epic experience denial of materialism through war, and how does the hero fuel his need to contend with the living. The hero used in this example is Achilles, as he exemplifies the heroic code that is so strong in Homer's works.

  • Flawed Hero Victor Frankenstein

    This essay tries to answer the question of whether Victor Frankenstein, in the Mary Shelley classic novel, acted heroically or was a flawed human being; a question that literary critics and analysists have attempted to answer for decades. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Flawed Hero Victor Frankenstein

    This essay tries to answer the question of whether Victor Frankenstein, in the Mary Shelley classic novel, acted heroically or was a flawed human being; a question that literary critics and analysists have attempted to answer for decades. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Review of Eight Million Ways to Die

    A 5 page book report on Lawrence Block's "Eight Million Ways to Die." No additional sources cited.

  • Suicide and the Symbolism in William Shakespeare's Hamlet

    This 5 page paper gives a brief synopsis of the play Hamlet by Shakespeare. Analyzed is the role of Ophelia and the symbolism of her character. Examples, citations and quotes offered. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literary Influence of the Romantic Period

    This is a 5 page paper which discusses the introduction of the Romantic Period in history and the influences literature of the day had in regards to its influence on society, music, drama and future literature. The revolutionary change in literature from rationalism in the 18th century to truth, self-identity, and humanitarianism in the 19th century had an enduring affect which still continues today. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Literature and Characterization

    This 6 page paper takes Doris Lessing's short story, Through the Tunnel and applies the techniques of characterization to it. The elements discussed are the author's use of symbolism, speech patterns, appearence, name, behavior, images and action. A brief overview of the short story given, as well. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Times Reflected in the Writings of John Keats, Moliere, and Niccolo Machiavelli

    This 5 page report discusses three great writers whose works give modern readers insight to the times in which they lived and wrote. Some of the world’s greatest literature is that which has been created using the truths of historical fact in which the work is created. Such literature can also serve as a means by which social theorists and historians are able to gain some measure of understanding into a culture’s ideals and belief systems. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Odour of Chrysanthemums' by D.H. Lawrence and 'Chrysanthemums' by John Steinbeck

    A 5 page essay that analyzes John Steinbeck's short story "The Chrysanthemums" and D. H. Lawrence's "Odour of Chrysanthemums." The writer argues that the female protagonists in the stories are similar, comparing similarities and differences in characterization. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Real Courage and Its Essence in 1984 by George Orwell

    5 pages in length. Will people have the courage to stand up for their hard earned democracy and intrinsic human rights if they one day find themselves forced to do so? It is a scary thing to imagine how one might react to forced authoritarianism after a lifetime of democracy, but one only has to think back to Hitler's regime to understand how power can get completely out of control, no matter how hard the populace fights against its takeover. George Orwell's "1984" speaks to the inherent nature of power and courage, two concepts that become interwoven as the book's hapless characters struggle to maintain their existence beneath overwhelming oppression. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Depiction of Women in D.H. Lawrence's Women in Love and James Joyce's Ulysses

    This is an 11 page paper discussing the portrayals of women through the characters of Molly in “Ulysses” by James Joyce and Ursula in “Women in Love” by D.H. Lawrence. Both Joyce and Lawrence intended to disrupt the current restrictive roles held by women in society. Joyce’s Molly provided a complete reversal of womanhood and took on a manlike perspective in her actions, words and infidelity. Lawrence’s Ursula however, maintained her independent thoughts and actions as a woman while attaining equality within her relationship and marriage. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Medieval Literature and Male Role Model Challenging

    This is a 7 page paper discussing the works of Chaucer and Malory and their challenges to the male role model presented in medieval society and traditional literature by writers such as Aquinas. Where Chaucer wrote new works from the perspectives of powerful women, Malory wrote on the weaknesses of the heroic male figures of Lancelot and Arthur. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia by Samuel Johnson and Obsession

    This 5 page paper argues that this book, which is usually seen as a story about the choices of life, may be more accurately interpreted as illustrating the obsession of the main characters. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • Mary McCarthy on the American Dream of Willy Loman

    This 5 page paper looks at the assumption that Willy Loman is just a product of America, and argues that such is not the case. Mary McCarthy's views are used as a springboard for discussion. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'The Rains Came' and 'Memoirs of a Female Physician'

    A five page paper which compares these two works, in terms of the way in which they explore the role of women in a male-dominated culture, and the nature of sacrifice in relation to women's place in society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Writings and the Impact of History

    This 5 page paper discusses the relationship between the violent era in Columbia's history and the novels of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Novels examined and cited are One Hundred Years of Solitude and No One Writes the Colonel. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Literature and Political Overtones

    This 5 page paper outlines the poltical overtones present in both the novels of Tolstoy and Kleist. Examples are given and cited from texts.Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Madame Butterfly and Cultural Context

    This 7 page paper considers the issues of gender, colonization and human psychology from the play of David Henry Hwang, M. Butterfly. This paper parallels the Pucinni opera, but changes the outcome to reflect changed perceptions of East/West politics. Examples from the text and cited. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • American Literature's Romantic Movement

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the Romantic movement in American literature. The While the Romantic movement throughout the world reflected the importance of nature and self-realization within man, the American Romantic movement was much more individualistic in its approach and its heroes were filled with risk which removed them from the norms of society. Probably the most popular and influential of the American Romantic writers was Ralph Waldo Emerson but other great writers of the time were Henry Thomas Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Bronson Alcott, William Ellery Channing, Hermann Melville, Mark Twain and Edgar Allan Poe. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Boundaries and Limitations

    This 5 page paper discusses the significance of boundaries and limits in Conrad's, "Heart of Darkness". This issue is examined in terms of the character, plot and symbolism in the story. Bibliography list 1 source.

  • 'You Touched Me' and 'The Horse Dealer's Daughter' by D.H. Lawrence

    A 3 page paper which compares and contrasts elements from D.H. Lawrence’s short stories “The Horse Dealer’s Daughter” and “You Touched Me.” No additional sources cited.

  • Different Interpretations of Biblical Events Lord Byron's View of the Story of Cain and Abel

    This 4 page paper discusses and compares the Holy Bible's Genesis to Byron's depiction of the events of Genesis. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature and Society's Veils or Illusions

    A 7 page paper which examines the veils, or illusions, of society in literature. The essay discusses characters as they make choices concerning compromises with society in exchange for happiness. The novels examined are “Robinson Crusoe” by Defoe, “Emma” by Jane Austen, “Joseph Andrews” by Fielding, and “The House of the Seven Gables” by Hawthorne. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Nature

    A 4 page paper which examines the use of nature in Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants” and Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Text and Film Versions of 'A Rose for Emily'

    A 4 page paper which compares and contrasts Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” to the film version of the story. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Fifty Grand,' 'The Natural History of the Dead,' and 'Hills Like White Elephants' by Ernest Hemingway

    This 3 page paper discusses three of Hemingway's short stories: Hills like White Elephants, The Natural History of the Dead, and Fifty Grand. Each are analyzed for summary, characters, and themes. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Culture of the Beowulf Poem

    A 7 page essay that analyzes the Old English epic poem Beowulf in regards to what the poem tells the modern reader about this culture. The writer discusses what sort of traits were admired by this culture, what they disdained, and what they considered to be the traits of good leader. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight' and Setting

    A 4 page paper which discusses the use of setting in the epic poem, and considers what physical or geographical settings are important, in what ways the setting helps to set the mood of the poem, what it reveals about character, and how various settings compare and contrast with each other. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Imperialism of Europe in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Chinua Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart, which concerns the period in which the British first came to Nigeria and the culture clash that this invasion brought about with the native population. Achebe presents a picture of African culture, as seen in the Igbo tribe, that has more nuance than simply presenting the British as ethnocentric and imperialistic in their efforts to impose colonialism on a native culture and the Africans as the "good guys." While Achebe presents native Nigerians with sympathy, he also shows the flaws in their culture, and in so doing, presents the positive, as well as the negative, effects of British colonization of Nigeria. No additional sources cited.

  • Harry Potter's Life Lessons

    A paper which looks at the life lessons one can find in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, with regard to Harry's personal development and his interaction with the other characters. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Themes of Good and Evil in Stowe's Novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin

    An 11 page paper which examines the concept of good and evil within the context of similarities between Uncle Tom and Jesus Christ and other parallels between the text and the Bible, (8.25 pp. + 3/4 pg. outline). Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature of the First World War, Dying, Mutilation, and Death

    A 7 page essay that examines the work of 5 WWI British poets and also Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises. The writer argues that this literature recounts the horrors of war through subtext, that is, not stating observations overtly. Subtext, expressed through metaphor, satire and allusion, provides the motivational engine that propels these works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston and the Characters of Tea Cake and Janie

    A 3 page paper which analyzes why Janie sticks with and loves Tea Cake in Zora Neale Hurston’s novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God.” No additional sources cited.

  • Mixture of Christianity and Paganism in 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (circa 1375-1400). The writer argues that this poem is an amalgamation of Christian and pagan elements, which are discussed and substantiated with quotes from the poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Mixture of Christianity and Paganism in 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (circa 1375-1400). The writer argues that this poem is an amalgamation of Christian and pagan elements, which are discussed and substantiated with quotes from the poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Hunters in the Snow by Tobias Wolff and Characterization

    This 6 page paper discusses the characterizations of Tobias Wolff in his short story: Hunters in the Snow. Characters analyzed for symbolism, psychology, and function. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Pericles' Funeral Oration as Reported by Thucydides

    A 3 page essay that proposes a hypothetical speech as it might have been given by a member of the Athenian leadership council in reaction to Pericles' funeral oration. The writer argues that due to the fact that Pericles largely devotes his speech to praising the virtues of the Athenian city, painting their culture as the epitome of freedom and individuality, it would have been political suicide for any Athenian leader to dispute this magnificent example of patriotic rhetoric. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature, Self, and Identity

    A 7 page paper which examines the theme of identity and sense of self in “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been” by Joyce Carol Oates, “Joe Turners Come and Gone” by August Wilson, and “Cathedral” by Raymond Carver. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Violence

    A 4 page essay that analyzes three literary works in regards to their use of violence. Throughout the history of Western literature, violence has been frequently used as an integral element of narrative. While unpleasant, often horrific, violence is nevertheless a commonality of human experience and often constitutes the defining element of individual lives. This factor is clearly evident in ancient literature as well as contemporary, as demonstrated in this examination of Sophocles' Oedipus the King, Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and Anne Tyler's Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • James Weldon Johnson's The Autobiography of an Ex Colored Man and Identity

    A 6 page paper which examines the search for identity through music, learning, and people in James Weldon Johnson’s work “The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man.” No additional sources cited.

  • French Literary Relationships Between Males and Females

    This 7 page paper looks at the novel The Invisible Man at the Window, and other French literature to see how men and women are portrayed. Gender issues are discussed in addition to the love relationships that exist between them. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Antigone and the Tragic Flaw of Antigone and Creon

    A 3 page paper which examines the tragic flaw which led to the downfall of Antigone and Creon in “Antigone.” No additional sources cited.

  • Literary Fiction and Self Discovery

    A 5 page paper which examines how modern literature offers a different look at self discovery than does literature from previous times. The works discussed in the examination of self discovery are Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” and Kate Chopin’s “The Awakening.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov

    A 4 page paper that offers a general discussion of The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov. The essay includes discussions on the parallels found in the work as well as the different levels on which the novel can be read. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • America from a Multicultural Perspective

    A 14 page contention that contemporary America has set the stage in terms of providing an example to the world of a multicultural country. The author of this paper provides observations on how the various fractions that compose our country interrelate. These observations are provided first from an academic approach, relying on the sociological and anthropological literature, then from a humanistic perspective relying on the popular literature. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Justifying Banning Books for Children That Feature Homosexual Parents

    A 9 page contention that homosexual parenting units are incapable of providing the parental guidance needed by heterosexual children. The author contends, therefore, that the tendency to ban children’s books depicting homosexual parenting units is a just one. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Justifying Banning Books for Children That Feature Homosexual Parents

    A 9 page contention that homosexual parenting units are incapable of providing the parental guidance needed by heterosexual children. The author contends, therefore, that the tendency to ban children’s books depicting homosexual parenting units is a just one. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • 'A Prayer for My Son' by William Butler Yeats

    A 7 page essay that offers a detailed explication of W.B. Yeats' poem "A Prayer for My Son," which is one of most religious poems, yet it also has secular aspects. By combining these two tonal features, Yeats demonstrates how the divine is intrinsically connected to the cares of everyday life. In this poem, the speaker, by beginning with this relationship to his son, extrapolates from the microcosm of his family life to the macrocosm of the relationship between the divine and humanity, and, in so doing, offers reassurance on the protective quality of love, both human and divine. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Good Men' Literary Comparison

    This 6-page paper analyzes John Wiltshier in "The Beach of Falesa" and Robert Chiltern in "An Ideal Husband" to determine how these two men becomes conflicted throughout their story.

  • Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe and Women

    This 4 page paper examines the role of women in Achebe's, "Things Fall Apart". By examining the way that the main character, Okonkwo, treats women, both their oppression and their power are revealed in this analysis. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literary Depiction of Africa

    This 4 page paper discusses the influence of Africa over the characters in Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Kingslover's The Poisonwood Bible. Quotes cited from texts. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literary Depiction of Cultures

    This 9 page paper contrasts and compares literature from the cultures of premodern Japan, Spain, and Africa. Things Fall Apart, One Hundred Years of Solitude, and premodern Japanese Fiction writers cited. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Black Literature and Violence

    A 15 page research paper/essay that examines the theme of violence in Frederick Douglass' Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and W.E.B. Du Bois' The Souls of Black Folk. The writer argues that the violence regularly perpetrated against people of African descent is a common thread connecting these works. While, naturally, these authors address other issues and complications of the institution of slavery, violence provides a background theme that serves to underscore all else. It is the coercive and pervasive element that white mainstream culture uses to keep blacks "in their place" during the antebellum era, and long after African Americans theoretically were free. In regards to the slave narratives of Douglass and Jacobs, the writer focuses on the differences between male and female slave experience. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Learning Lessons in Billy Budd and Antigone

    A 3 page essay that argues that the main theme in both Sophocles' Antigone and Herman Melville's Billy Budd is a warning that the society that ignores humanitarian issues does so at its own peril. These narratives warn us that the society that puts punitive justice ahead of all else may be enacting a certain kind of justice, but it does so at the expense of its own soul. In a country that is prosecuting children to the full extent of the law, it is a lesson that should be noticed. No additional sources cited.

  • Nonfiction and Fiction's Portrayal of History

    This 5 page paper discusses the work of James Welch in his novel, The Heartsong of Charging Elk and the documentary with Paul Stekler called, Killing Custer. The use of various literary vehicles are explored. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Ecocriticism and the Literature of John McGahern

    An 8 page paper which examines the literature of John McGahern from an ecocrticial position. The paper examines the relationship between McGahern’s fiction and the physical environment and the relationship between the protagonists and the landscape. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Victor Frankenstein's Creation Process

    This 4 page paper discusses the process of creation that Victor Frankenstein followed in Shelley's Frankenstein's Monster. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Love in Geoffrey Chaucer's 'Parliament of Fowles' and 'The Book of the Duchesse'

    A 14 page research paper that argues that love plays a pivotal thematic role in two of Geoffrey Chaucer's greatest poems, The Book of the Duchesse and The Parliament of Fowles. While Chaucer is acknowledged as one of the greatest and most eloquent advocates of love in English literature, in these poems, he qualified his endorsement and dedication to love by placing it within certain institutional and societal boundaries. In The Book of the Duchesse, his elegy of consolation over the death of the Black Knight's lady is couched within the parameters established by the conventions of courtly love. Likewise, while the Parliament of Fowles is a love poem, Chaucer pictures love as susceptible to certain natural laws that should be meticulously followed. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'The Man Who Died' by D.H. Lawrence

    This 4 page paper examines this early Lawrence story that was originally entitled The Escaped Cock. The significance of the original title as well as the repetitive nature of the phrase "the man who died" are each discussed. The story is also analyzed in a more general sense. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'This World is not Conclusion' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page paper analyzing Emily Dickinson’s Poem 501. Dickinson makes her point in the first line of the poem, and provides the remainder of it in support of her opening statement. Her message is that despite the efforts of people to explain God, ignore God, “serve” God or define God, He operates in a manner that defies human logic and focuses on the individual. If the individual is able to avoid awareness of God, He is at work nonetheless, nibbling away at the soul, making His presence sensed, at least, if not fully known without first gaining commitment of belief. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Abused Child and Historical Abuses of the Irish in The Butcher Boy by Patrick McCabe

    A 6 page paper which examines the film and novel, written by Patrick McCabe, “The Butcher Boy” as it uses the abused child as a metaphor for the abuse of the Irish in history. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Overview of the Play The Crucible by Arthur Miller

    This 10 page paper provides an overview of Arthur Miller's The Crucible. This paper outlines the main characters and then provides an overview of the acts of the play. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Themes in the Works of Alexei and Ivan, the Brothers Karamazov

    This 4 page paper provides an overview of the central themes of The Brothers Karamazov. This is a story of two brothers, Ivan and Alexei, and their trials in the midst of changes in late 19th century Russia. While these two brothers share common elements including geography and social development, they are significantly different in a number of important ways.

  • Beowulf & Aeneas

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares Beowulf with Aeneas. Beowulf is the protagonist in an Old English epic of the same name by an anonymous poet. Aeneas is the protagonist in the ancient Roman epic of Virgil, the Aeneid. These two heroes each represent transitions in their societies. Beowulf provides the transition between a world terrorized by evil to one of peace. Aeneas provides the transition from the old world of Troy to the glory of the new world of Rome. In providing these transitions, each epic offers insight on the differing worldviews that each work represents, that is, the world of Roman values and the world of ninth century Germanic society. No bibliography is offered.

  • Research Proposal: Nick in "The Great Gatsby"

    This 3 page paper is a proposal to analyze the character of Nick in "The Great Gatsby," explaining why this character was chosen. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Women’s Friendship: “The Color Purple”

    A 5 page paper which examines the friendship of women regarding Celie and Sofia in “The Color Purple” by Alice Walker. No additional sources cited.

  • Revenge as a Theme in Literature

    This 6 page paper compares the way in which the revenge theme is handled by Shakespeare in Hamlet, Poe in "The Cask of Amontillado" and Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess." Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Nick Carraway/The Great Gatsby

    An 8 page essay that focuses on the character of Nick Carraway as the narrative voice in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. The writer argues that Nick Carraway, as Gatsby's friend and Daisy's cousin, is the ideal choice for providing the narrative voice of the novel, for a number of reasons. First of all, because the reader learns about Gatsby as Nick does, this gives the novel a definitive structure, which concentrates on the illusion that Gatsby has created in the opening chapters and then slowly reveals pertinent details of Gatsby's life as Nick discovers them. Nick's character also provides Fitzgerald with a means of commenting, interpreting and evaluating the action of the novel. In this manner, Nick's narration gives the reader insight into both Gatsby and Daisy that would otherwise be unavailable if Fitzgerald had chosen either one of these characters for providing the main point-of-view. Furthermore, Nick gives the reader someone with whom they can readily identify, as his emotional progress throughout the novel offers a hopeful template for reconciling the negative features of the era with a traditional past. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • The Existential Peanuts

    This 3 page paper considers whether or not Peanuts could be considered as an examination of existentialism as well as an extremely amusing comic strip, and concludes that it can. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature and Life

    A 3 page paper which examines Arnold Weinstein’s thesis, in his book “A Scream Goes Through the House: What Literature Teaches Us About Life,” which indicates that literature provides us information regarding human conditions. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature and Life

    A 3 page paper which examines Arnold Weinstein’s thesis, in his book “A Scream Goes Through the House: What Literature Teaches Us About Life,” which indicates that literature provides us information regarding human conditions. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Dante's 9th Circle/A Contemporary Vision

    A 5 page research paper that discusses Dante Alighieri's medieval masterpiece The Divine Comedy. The writer states that this poem is a profound statement on medieval theology, but is also a commentary by Dante on medieval society. These verses picture Dante, being led by the pagan poet Virgil, through Hell, Purgatory and Heaven. In Hell, i.e., The Inferno, Dante pictures meeting notorious sinners: some contemporary with his era; some from the past. This inspires the question of how the present day's most notorious compare to those whom Dante included in his epic poem. The writer discusses John Walker Lindh, Timothy McVeigh, Jeffrey Dahmer and the Unabomber in relation to where they would go in the Ninth Circle of Dante's vision of Hell. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Maya Angelou/Caged Bird

    A 4 page essay that discusses aspects of Angelou's autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. The first section of this report discusses the significance of this title, which is taken from a poem by Paul Dunbar. The second half offers a detailed description of Angelou's family tree, drawing description of each member of her family from the text. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Role of Faith/Cry, the Beloved Country

    A 3 page essay that discusses the role of faith in Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton. The true faith of protagonist Stephen Kumalo is contrasted briefly against the self-serving "faith" of Nathan Price in Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible. No additional sources cited.

  • Role of Faith/Cry, the Beloved Country

    A 3 page essay that discusses the role of faith in Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton. The true faith of protagonist Stephen Kumalo is contrasted briefly against the self-serving "faith" of Nathan Price in Barbara Kingsolver's The Poisonwood Bible. No additional sources cited.

  • Narrative Writing & Shepherd's Christmas Story

    A 7 page research paper/essay that discusses narrative writing technique by analyzing an excerpt from Jean Shepherd's A Christmas Story. The writer describes good narrative techniques and then applies them to the text of the Shepherd narrative. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Vernacular Tradition and African-American Literature

    This 3 page paper explains what vernacular tradition is and why Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech is an example of that tradition. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • “The Gates of Fire” by Steven Pressfield

    A 4 page review of Steven Pressfield’s “The Gates of Fire.” No additional sources cited.

  • Beowulf & Odysseus/Ancient Heroes

    A 6 page essay that contrasts and compares Beowulf and Odysseus. The sagas of these two heroes seem similar at first glance because the ancient epic poems that record their exploits both deal with heroic action, battles against monsters and similar feats of daring-do. However, a closer look at both the Beowulf poem and Homer's Odyssey shows that these tales are each products of the culture that produced them. Therefore, they reflect different cultures, different eras, and different beliefs about what it means to be a hero. No additional sources cited.

  • Gender in Beowulf

    A 3 page essay that discusses the role of women and gender in Beowulf, the Old English epic, is reflective the culture of Germanic tribes that invaded England during the early middle ages. A close examination of this poem shows that gender and women play a distinctive role in this tale of heroism. While Beowulf's focus is on the warrior ethos and what this entails, there is also the fact that the poem implies fear of female power, along with an overarching societal need to keep women in a properly subjugated role. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Tan, Orwell and Baldwin: Language

    A 4 page paper which examines “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan, “Politics and the English Language” by George Orwell, and “If Black Language Isn’t a Language, The Tell Me, What Is?” by James Baldwin and then examines their discussions of language and identity, and language as political. No additional sources cited.

  • Poe/Annabel Lee

    A 3 page explication of Edgar Allan Poe's last poem, Annabel Lee, which was written in 1849. The writer argues that this poem is a haunting tribute by the still grieving Poe for his young wife Virginia who had passed away two years previously from tuberculosis. Examination of this poem's theme, mood and point-of-view demonstrates the depth of emotion that Poe had for his deceased child/bride, as well as how he viewed his own death with equanimity because he saw it as uniting him with his beloved. No additional sources cited.

  • Poe/Annabel Lee

    A 3 page explication of Edgar Allan Poe's last poem, Annabel Lee, which was written in 1849. The writer argues that this poem is a haunting tribute by the still grieving Poe for his young wife Virginia who had passed away two years previously from tuberculosis. Examination of this poem's theme, mood and point-of-view demonstrates the depth of emotion that Poe had for his deceased child/bride, as well as how he viewed his own death with equanimity because he saw it as uniting him with his beloved. No additional sources cited.

  • Poe/Annabel Lee

    A 3 page explication of Edgar Allan Poe's last poem, Annabel Lee, which was written in 1849. The writer argues that this poem is a haunting tribute by the still grieving Poe for his young wife Virginia who had passed away two years previously from tuberculosis. Examination of this poem's theme, mood and point-of-view demonstrates the depth of emotion that Poe had for his deceased child/bride, as well as how he viewed his own death with equanimity because he saw it as uniting him with his beloved. No additional sources cited.

  • Reading as a Form of Resistance

    A 5 page essay that references James Scott's essay "Behind the Official Story" and Azar Nafisi's "Selections from Reading Lolita in Tehran." The writer uses the Scott text to explain how Nafisi creates a hidden transcript for her students through literature, which helps keep her female students preserve their sense of self identity in the face of patriarchal religious oppression. No additional source cited. The bibliographical references for the two essays is incomplete.

  • Grief in The Lovely Bones

    This 3 page paper examines this novel and focuses on the mother character. How the grief process has been halted is the focus of attention. Suggestions are made. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The World of Work

    This 3 page paper uses two works of literature to comment on the way in which work can destroy a person; in one ("Hazel tells LaVerne"), the lack of self-esteem leads a woman to miss a great opportunity; in the other ("A&P"), a manager's slavish devotion to "the rules" costs him a good employee. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Jay Gatsby: A Great Man?

    A 4 page paper which examines whether or not Jay Gatsby, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby, is a great man or not. No additional sources cited.

  • Sandra Cisneros: Women Hollering Creek

    Sexual Warfare : A 4 page paper which examines the politics of sexual warfare in three stories from Sandra Cisneros’ work Women Hollering Creek. No additional sources cited.

  • "The Way of a Ship"

    This 3 page paper takes its inspiration from the novel "The Way of a Ship" by Derek Lundy to explore the ocean conditions around Cape Horn. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • "My Own Country: A Doctor's Story"

    This 5 page paper discusses the book "My Own Country" by Abraham Verghese, who worked with AIDS patients in rural Tennessee in the 1980s. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Children's Literature: Borders between Worlds

    This 6 page paper discusses the way the characters in "Wind in the Willows" and "Peter Pan" move between the real world and the fantasy world of their stories. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Moral and Ethical Principles Learned from The Odyssey

    This 3 page paper discusses three moral and ethical ideas we can find in The Odyssey. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Dress as a Representation of Human Sexuality and Gender

    This 5 page paper discusses "Assaulted and Pursued Chastity" by Margaret Cavendish and "The Taming of the Shrew" by Shakespeare and how they use dress to represent human sexuality and gender relationships. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Idea of Free Will in Mann's Mario and the Magician

    This 5 page paper examines this well known story that many claim is a parallel to fascism. This paper explores the less discussed theme of free will. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Yellow Wallpaper & Female Marginalization

    A 5 page research paper/essay that discusses Charlotte Perkins Gilman's short story "The Yellow Wallpaper" (1899), which can be understood as indicative of women's role in late nineteenth century society. This narrative portrays the way in which Victorian patriarchal attitudes served to marginalize women. Male authority trivialized female voices and regarded women more as children in adult bodies than as adult themselves. In addition to this element, Gilman's short story also introduces the way in which the medical professional interacted with women, supporting the cultural paradigm that marginalized women and added the authority of the male doctor to the social boundaries that keep women from having any sense of adult autonomy. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Gothic Movement in Literature

    A 7 page paper which examines the Gothic movement in literature as seen in the works of Edgar Allan Poe and Mary Shelley. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Symbolism in Belle Epoch Literature

    A 4 page paper which examines the influence of symbolism in Belle Epoch literature. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Concepts in Short Stories

    This 3 page paper discusses Kafka's short story "In a Penal Colony" and whether or not it represents procedural justice and argues that it does not. Then it discusses Willa Cather's work "Paul's Case," "The Country Doctor" by Balzac and "The Swimmer" by Cheever, and argues that only Neddy in the swimmer would be considered to have a life that Sisyphus would applaud. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Sexual Behavior in "The Godfather"

    This 7 page paper discusses the animalistic nature of sex acts in Mario Puzo's novel "The Godfather." Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Pushkin/Moor of Peter the Great

    A 10 page research paper/essay that examines an incomplete work by Alexandr Sergeyevitch Pushkin (1799-1837), a "founding father" of Russian literature. In 1827, Pushkin began, but never completed, a novel based on the life of his African ancestor and his relationship to Peter the Great entitled "The Moor of Peter the Great." The writer explores Pushkin's portrayal of both the Tsar and his ancestor and relates this to why Pushkin might not have finished this novel. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Gold and Bettelheim: Fairy Tales

    This 4 page paper is a reaction to articles by Kari Gold and Bruno Bettelheim, in which the authors discuss fairy tales. The paper argues that Gold's approach is more accessible than Bettelheim's, who tends to go deeper into psychological examination of the stories than is supported by the text. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Edith Wharton’s Roman Fever

    A 6 page analysis of Edith Wharton’s short story Roman Fever. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Wordsworth/Solitary Reaper

    A 4 page essay that offers summation and analysis of Williams Wordsworth's "The Solitary Reaper, a poem which offers a romantic view of what was undoubtedly a common sight during his lifetime for anyone traveling through the countryside--a person reaping the grain harvest on some rural farmstead. The context of the poem implies the everyday nature of this occurrence. However, Wordsworth's romantic vision teaches his reader to perceive this young woman, reaping and singing to herself, with new eyes and to consider how this ordinary scene was uniquely beautiful. No additional sources cited.

  • Chopin/The Awakening/Suicide as Closure

    A 4 page reaction essay to Kate Chopin's nineteenth century novel The Awakening. In this essay, the writer argues that Edna Pontellier commits suicide not because she cannot escape the yoke of patriarchy, but because she cannot escape her own scarred psyche and the biological destiny of being female. No additional sources cited.

  • Anne Bradsreet/In Reference to Her Children, 23 June 1659

    A 3 page explication of this poem by Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), America's first published poet, who wrote her verse while raising eight children, and performing all of the wifely duties expected of Puritan wife in colonial New England (Anne Bradstreet). While Bradstreet stepped somewhat outside the societal sphere of hearth and home, which was the accepted realm of women, by writing verse, her verse underscored her understanding of the domestic role, and therefore, did not offend Puritan society. Her poem "In Reference to her Children, 23 June 1659" expresses a mother's pride at the accomplishments of her children, as well as mother's fears at having her little ones leave the "nest" and fly away on their own. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Gary Jennings/Aztec

    A 6 page book review and essay that consists of 2 parts, each 3 pages in length. The first half of the paper offers a synopsis of the novel Aztec by Gary Jennings. The write covers the structure and main topics of the novel, describing how it informs the reader about Aztec culture. The second part of the paper then compares Aztec culture to the modern world, pointing out similarities and differences. No additional sources cited.

  • Sutton Hoo and its Relationship to Literature

    This 7 page paper examines this famous burial ground and looks at its significance. Literature found at the site is duly noted but its inspiration on later literature and its confirmation of literature of the day are issues explored. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Sutton Hoo and its Relationship to Literature

    This 7 page paper examines this famous burial ground and looks at its significance. Literature found at the site is duly noted but its inspiration on later literature and its confirmation of literature of the day are issues explored. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Medieval Literature/Marie de France & Chaucer

    A 3 page research paper/essay that addresses 3 topics from medieval literature. The first page is on Marie de France and her lai "Lanval." The second page is on Chaucer's motivation in writing The Canterbury Tales and uses the example of the Prioress to argue that he used this novel to comment on his society. The third page discusses Chaucer's structure and influences in writing his masterpiece. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Madeleine L'Engle's 'A Wrinkle in Time'

    6 pages in length. Science fiction has never been quite the same for the elementary and secondary school students who read Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time. Bringing together the concepts of good versus evil, courage, love's power and the coming of age, this endearing and enduring book has stood the test of time and proven itself worthy of being revisited again and again. The story, which chronicles the adventures of thirteen-year-old Meg Murry and her five-year-old brother Charles, possesses numerous fantasy elements which inspire the reader's imagination and encourage him to become intimately involved with the characters. The writer discusses characters, lessons and morals as they relate to A Wrinkle in Time. No additional sources used.

  • Jasmine by Bharati Mukherjee

    A 7 page paper that provides an overview of the theme of Americanization in Bharati Mukherjee's Jasmine and underscores the belief that true assimilation into American culture is seldom achieved by illegal immigrants. Bibliography lists no additional sources.

  • Pain and Healing in Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin

    A 5 page examination of James Baldwin's short story Sonny's Blues. The writer examines Baldwins use of foreshadowing and the metaphors of light, darkness and ice and how music seems to be the healing element in the story. No additonal sources cited.

  • The Definition of Utopia

    This 5 page paper examines three encyclopedia definitions of the term utopia and compares them to the utopia which is defined by Marge Piercy in her book, Woman on the Edge of Time.

  • She's Come Undone by Wally Lamb

    In 5 pages, the writer discusses the novel "She's Come Undone" by Wally Lamb. The questions of "How does Dolores' life parallel her mother's?", and How does she ultimately triumph and move beyond her tie to her mother's failures?" are answered.

  • Lake of the Woods Novel by Tim O'Brien

    A 5 page paper which analyzes Tim O'Brien's 1994 novel, Lake of the Woods, to determine how events from John Wade's past made his future inevitable, whether his outcome was just or unjust as well as O'Brien's interpretation. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Feminist Criticism and Literature

    6 pages in length. To say that women have had to fight for their existence within the literary world would be a gross understatement. Indeed, the road to self-expression through the written word has been paved with patriarchal intolerance and characteristic skepticism. That women have been forced to prove their worthiness within the stringent boundaries of a male-dominated existence speaks volumes about the inherent fortitude that comprises the female spirit. The writer discusses feminist critical theory as it relates to women writers, focusing upon a story by Doris Lessing. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Themes of Motherhood and Maternalism in Dessa Rose by Sherley Ann Williams and Beloved by Toni Morrison

    A 5 page paper comparing and contrasting the protagonists' ability to assume the responsibilities of motherhood. The paper argues that Because the slave does not have any autonomy of her own, she cannot function in a typical maternal relationship to a dependent child; therefore, she needs to either break out of her cycle of submission, or have someone else to do her mothering for her. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Importance of Memory in Beloved by Toni Morrison

    A 3 page essay discussing the essentiality of memory, re-call memory, and disremembering. The writer compares and discusses the painful memories of several key characters including : Sethe, Baby Suggs, and Paul D. Elements of the comparison include the effects of memory on each character and how they deal with it.

  • The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

    5 pages in length. Analytically examines three social issues explored in Toni Morrison's classic 'The Bluest Eye' from an Afro-centric perspective. Issues are social class & structure, stereotypes, and race. Uses three pertinent references (listed in bibliography) to support ideas.

  • Violence and Socialization in The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

    A 5 page paper that looks at the interactions between Junior and Pecola and evaluates a passage describing Junior's nurturing as a precursor to their violent interaction. No additional sources cited.

  • Selfhood in Mean Spirit by Linda Hogan and The Color Purple by Alice Walker

    A 7 page paper comparing Alice Walker's The Color Purple to Linda Hogan's Mean Spirit. The paper focuses on the two protagonists, Walker's Celie and Hogan's Belle, and observes that Celie is the more fully realized character because the book is centered on her quest for selfhood; Belle is just a symbol for the Indian race. Bibliography lists one source.

  • The Afrocentricism of Dee in 'Everyday Use' by Alice Walker

    A 5 page research paper that examines the way that Walker uses the character of Dee to make some profound statements on what it means to be African-American. The writer argues that this short story contrasts Dee's faddish 'Afrocentricism' against the very real, nurturing values of her mother and sister. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Disturbing Conflict in Possessing the Secret of Joy by Alice Walker

    A 5 page paper that provides an overview of the major points and characters in Walker's work. Bibliography lists no additional sources.

  • Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry and the Theme of Material Happiness and Money

    This 5 page report discusses the attitude of the play's main character, Walter Lee Younger, and his belief that only enough money and possessions can make him and his family happy and successful leads only to disaster. He learns that much greater values are at stake than simply having the most 'stuff.' No secondary sources.

  • Willa Cather's My Antonia

    This 6 page paper discusses one of Willa Cather's best known and best-loved novels. The report covers the plot, characters, setting, and tone of the narrative voice. No additional sources cited.

  • Helga Crane and Quicksand by Nella Larsen

    A 5 page paper discussion about the book, 'Quicksand,' by Nella Larsen. The discussion addresses the issues surrounding Helga Crane. These issues include race, gender, and social class. The characther most heavily discussed is the character of Helga Crane, who illustrates very well how the issues involved are heavily interrelated for they are nothing more than the fine details of a larger picture. No additional sources provided.

  • Historical Fiction Analysis of Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    In this 10 page paper, the writer discusses how fictional works such as Uncle Tom's Cabin demonstrate how fiction can be successfully used to explain a situation on a personal basis to influence others. Issues concerning gender and racial stereotyping are examined as elements of Stowe's theme in an attempt to determine their level of historic realism. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Topsy Stereotyping in Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    A 10 page essay analyzing the characterization of this little girl in Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic work. The paper concludes that Harriet Beecher Stowe intended to show through her portrayal of Topsy that blacks are not inherently morally bankrupt, but simply unsaved souls who have never been shown the true path to salvation. Thus it was intended to be a symbol, not a realistic characterization. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Racist Description of Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    A 7 page paper that describes the fact that Stowe's novel is influential and derived from an abolitionist perspective, but at the same time is clearly racist. The author attempts to support this belief by demonstrating the racist off shoots of the abolitionist movement, including colonization, that Stowe supports in her work. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Christ Symbolism in Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    A 6 page essay analyzing the title character of Harriet Beecher Stowe's work. It points out that Uncle Tom was never intended to be realistic, because he is a symbol for Christ and therefore for the holiness of the black man. Numerous correspondences between the life of Christ and the Uncle Tom narrative are provided. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    A general 3 page plot summary of Stowe's 'Uncle Tom's Cabin.' The writer covers specific events as they relate to characters. No other sources cited.

  • Disillusionment in Babylon Revisited by F. Scott Fitzgerald and A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennesse Williams

    In this 6 page paper, the writer demonstrates how the theme of disillusionment is developed through the characterizations of Blanche DuBois and Charlie Wales in these two short stories. No additional sources cited.

  • Communication in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, The Glass Menagerie, and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

    A 6 page research paper which examines how a failure to communicate impacts the characters in three of Williams' most famous plays, The Glass Menagerie , Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and A Streetcar named Desire. The writer demonstrates how Williams illustrates his view that an inability to communicate meaningfully with other human beings is one of the most tragic situations in modern life. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Dust Tracks on a Road Autobiography by Zora Neale Hurston

    A 5 page essay on Zora Neale Hurston's autobiography. It describes Zora's life briefly, then analyzes two major problems with the book, namely Zora's lack of closure regarding her prophetic 'visions' and her inability to perceive herself as a member of an oppressed race. No additional sources cited.

  • Token Whites in the Works of Zora Neale Hurston

    A 6 page analysis of Jonah's Gourd Wine, Guilded Six-Bits, Sweat, Spunk, Drenched in Light, & John Reddding Goes to Sea -- looking at how Hurston uses the white token to bring about the black experience in regards to separatism and belonging--from a societal viewpoint. The paper discusses Hurston's goals of bringing together both societies for an egalitarian purpose rather than promote a separatist viewpoint for either black or white society.

  • Ain't I A Woman by Bell Hooks

    A 5 page paper that provides an overview of Hooks' book, while also concentrating on her philosophical perspective. This paper contends that Hooks bases her work on the racial aspects that have led to racial and gender oppression, and provides a discourse for change. No additional sources cited.

  • Bell Hooks' Postmodern Blackness

    A 7 page paper which discusses various aspects of the work on postmodern blackness, written by Bell Hooks. The work of Bell Hooks, especially in relationship to postmodern blackness which involves aesthetics and critical thought as attainable, if not possessed, by the black population, is considered incredibly controversial as well as contradictory. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Analysis of Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

    A 9 page paper that analyzes Joseph Conrad's 1902 novel, 'Heart of Darkness.' The writer is primarily concerned with evaluating the character of Marlow.

  • Typhoon by Joseph Conrad

    A 5 page book report which provides an overview of Joseph Conrad's 1903 novel, 'Typhoon.' Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Heathcliff and Catherine in Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

    A 5 page paper that describes the relationship between Heathcliff and Catherine in terms of societal constraints. This writer presents the significant adversity faced by these two characters that made their love unattainable. No additional sources cited.

  • Desire and Chastity in The Faerie Queene by Edward Spenser and Paradise Lost by John Milton'

    A 5 page paper examining the issue of chastity versus desire in Milton's Paradise Lost and Spenser's The Faerie Queene. Looking particularly at the characters of Eve and Britomart, the paper concludes that for both authors, chastity does not mean physical celibacy as much as it means a self-disciplined restraint on wanton desire. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Science and Technology in Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

    A 9 page paper on Aldous Huxley's 1932 futuristic novel. The paper discusses Huxley's view that science and technology should serve man, not the other way around, and society should never have to adapt itself to an ideology that does not serve its spiritual as well as its physical and social needs. No sources.

  • Ethical Considerations in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    A 5 page comparison of Victor Frankenstein himself with the Creature he made. The paper characterizes Dr. Victor Frankenstein as a portrait of all those scientific over-achievers who give no heed to the ethics of their experimentations, and Victor's Creature as the representation all those victims who have to live with the effects. Bibliography lists three sources.

  • 'Double' Theme in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

    A 7 page paper looking at both the motif of the double personality in this novel, and the double genres -- allegory and Gothic -- in which it was written. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Character Destiny and Scenes of Clerical Life by George Eliot

    A 5 page exploratory analysis regarding a statement made by Eliot that 'character is destiny.' Two of the stories in this trilogy: The Sad Fortunes of the Rev. Amos Barton and Janet's Repentance are reviewed for clues supporting or contradicting this statement. The writer suggests evidence that the statement must be one that is indeed qualified since one main character clearly has choices that can be made but the other seems to be limited by external forces.

  • The Virgin and the Gipsy by D.H. Lawrence

    This 4 page report discusses the theme of desire in the 1930 novella 'The Virgin and the Gipsy.' No additional sources cited.

  • Ben Jonson's Humanism

    A 5 page paper looking at the presence of humanism in Ben Jonson's 'Inviting a Friend to Supper'. The paper shows how Renaissance humanism developed from the extreme ecclesiastical orientation of the Middle Ages, and points out its manifestations in this poem. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Happy Days by Samuel Beckett

    A 5 page character analysis of Winnie in Samuel Beckett's infamous play entitled 'Happy Days.' The writer feels that she represented the self-transgression of loneliness and the mundane emptiness that life can have. Several quotes from the play are used to support this thesis.

  • Imperfection Valued in Utopia by Sir Thomas More

    A 3 page look at the geopolitical beliefs expounded in Utopia and how such societies have traditionally failed throughout the course of history. The writer argues that rather than strive for the unattainable, we should learn to appreciate the value of imperfection. No other sources cited.

  • No Social Perfection in Utopia by Sir Thomas More

    A 3 page essay criticizing More's Utopia in an historical context. The writer feels that a 'perfect' society is not possible when it has war, prisoners or war, and slavery. Examples from other Utopian ideologies are presented to illustrate points made. No other sources cited.

  • J.R.R. Tolkien's Imaginary Worlds and Philology

    In this 5 page essay, the writer essentially discusses the life and works of Tolkein,-- focusing specifically upon the imaginary worlds he managed to create in "The Hobbit" and "Lord Of The Rings" and his love for language (philology). Throughout the essay, examples of words and names created by Tolkein are provided as are their meanings & usefulness in his stories. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Search for Jon Winthrop in The Puritan Dilemma

    A 10 page paper discussing the examination of a concluding statement of the author: '...the broader vision that Winthrop stood for could never be wholly subdued. No Puritan could be a Puritan and remain untouched by it, for it arose out of the central Puritan dilemma, the problem of doing right in a world that does wrong.' The paper examines that Puritan dilemma, particularly in the light of Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson, with emphasis on the personal searches of John Winthrop. All references to the Bible are NIV. No other sources cited.

  • The Search for Jon Winthrop in The Puritan Dilemma

    A 10 page paper discussing the examination of a concluding statement of the author: '...the broader vision that Winthrop stood for could never be wholly subdued. No Puritan could be a Puritan and remain untouched by it, for it arose out of the central Puritan dilemma, the problem of doing right in a world that does wrong.' The paper examines that Puritan dilemma, particularly in the light of Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson, with emphasis on the personal searches of John Winthrop. All references to the Bible are NIV. No other sources cited.

  • Medieval Literature and Common Themes

    This 6 page paper examines three works: Beowulf, The Song of Roland and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Three common elements for the stories are highlighted. One is that each contain elements of fantasy, another is that they all contain a great degree of human suffering, and finally, each of the stories contain characters that exhibit loyalty. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparing Wordsworth's 'Ode Intimations of Mortality' to Keats' 'Ode to a Grecian Urn'

    A 5 page comparison of the literary genre of odes using the poems of two of the most noted poets of the romantic genre. Discusses the ode genre, distinguishing between irregular odes and regular odes. Emphasizes that while certain aspects such as structure differ in many respects between Wordsworth’s “Ode” and Keats’ “The Grecian Urn”, there are a number of commonalties between these presentations as well. No additional sources are listed.

  • Feminist Utopian Literature Represented by Women on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy

    A 6 page paper which the concept of utopia from a feminist context, providing insight into the author’s ideology, with a brief background to consider the times in which the novel was written, and a specific consideration of what makes the novel utopian, in terms of content, form and structure. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literary Comparison of Wallace McRae's 'Reincarnation,' Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

    A 5 page paper which analyzes how point-of-view shapes the exposition, prose, style, tone, plot, theme, and character of these works. No additional sources are used.

  • Alice Walker's The Color Purple and Women's Roles

    Alice Walker's 1982, Pulitzer Prize award-winning novel, The Color Purple has become a classic in defining the role of women of color. This 7 page discussion will look at some of those stereotypical roles of the past and make an effort to determine whether they have changed or just taken on another disguise, in relationship to the society today.

  • Literary Comparison of Graham Greene's 'The Destructors' and D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner'

    A 5 page paper (4-1/2 pp. + ½ pg. outline) which compares and contrasts each story’s plot, characters’ emotions and feelings, setting and mood, authors’ purposes (whether to entertain, satirize, realistically portray a life problem, analysis of emotions and responses, communicate a moralistic message), and the authors’ styles. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Historic British Literary Heroes

    This 5 page paper looks at how heroes are portrayed in literature, with an emphasis on British literary periods. Eras discussed include the Renaissance period and the Anglo-Saxon period. Several well-known works are mentioned such as Hamlet, Gulliver's Travels and Frankenstein. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Music and Brotherly Love in Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin

    A 5 page research paper that analyzes James Baldwin's short story Sonny's Blues. The writer contrasts the character of two brothers, one of whom, Sonny, is a musician who has recently been released from prison for possession of heroin. The narrator comes to understand his brother through his music. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Barbara Kingsolver's Pigs in Heaven

    5 pages. Best known for her best-selling book The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver has woven another intricate tale with sympathetic and realistic characters that have an interesting story to tell. Pigs in Heaven is a book steeped in the tradition of the Cherokee Nation, and emphasizes the importance of children maintaining a connection with their culture and the roots of their history. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Theology of Herman Melville in his Writings

    This 5 page paper provides an overview and a contextualization of Herman Melville's religious theology or ideology presented through his short stories. This paper integrates a view of a number of his short stories, including The Piazza, Benito Cereno, and Billy Budd. This paper integrates a view of these fictional texts as a basis for understanding the Puritan perspectives that influenced Melville's development as an author. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Three Plays by Federico Garcia Lorca

    6 pages in length. The sexual instinct that represents the creativity in Federico Garcia Lorca's trilogy of three plays depicting Spain's cultural identity clearly establishes the manner by which the playwright aspires to portray the intensity of his characters' existence. Interwoven amidst this underlying sexual instinct is the relationship of Spain's socioeconomic concerns at that time and how Lorca reinforces this subject with the use of theatrical and artistic methods. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'The Odyssey' by Homer and Sports

    A 6 page paper which examines why sports is important to the poem, and the role it played in defining the characters and their actions. No additional sources are used.

  • Optimism in Literature for Children During the Second World War

    7 pages in length. The sole objective of children's literature during World War II was to put forth a sense of strength, hope and reassurance; despite the horrors of the Depression and World War II, children's literature written between the 1930s and 1950s witnessed an unfailing optimism. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • British Literature's Mainstream Tradition and Peripheral Culture

    A ten page paper which looks at the mainstream tradition in British literature and the way in which peripheral culture and literature is gradually being redefined, particularly with reference to the works of such writers as Chinua Achebe and Derek Walcott. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Placing a Historical Value on 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page paper which analyzes the epic poem from a historical context, considering if the events depicted are real, if the information can be verified, and examines the author’s intentions for writing the poem. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Placing a Historical Value on 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page paper which analyzes the epic poem from a historical context, considering if the events depicted are real, if the information can be verified, and examines the author’s intentions for writing the poem. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Journeys and Their Philosophical Meaning in 'Inferno' by Dante Alighieri and 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 5 page paper which examines the role of philosophy in the similar journeys taken in each of these epic poems. No additional sources are used.

  • Connection Between Friday and Crusoe in Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

    A 6 page paper which first considers Crusoe’s early relationship with a Moorish boy named Xury, and how this parallels the subsequent relationship between Crusoe and Friday in an attempt to determine whether Friday follows Crusoe because he loves him, fears him, or a combination of both. Specifically considered are Crusoe’s rescue of Friday, their discussion of theology, Friday’s father, the duo’s journey to Europe, Friday’s death, and how this parallels Crusoe’s earlier relationship with Xury, and how both relate to events in world history such as Christianity, colonialism and slavery. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Masculine Identity in Literature Questions Answered

    A 6 page research paper that answers five questions pertaining to masculine identity in short stories by Garrison Keillor, Ernest Hemingway, Sherman Alexie, and Richard Wright. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature Portrayal of Extreme Experience

    A 12 page research paper that examines Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar; Flannery O'Connor's Good Country People; and Primo Levi's Survival in Auschwitz. By examining these works, the writer argues that one can readily see how extreme experiences present a challenge to identity that is difficult to overcome, as it affects all aspects of human existence. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literary Works and Socioeconomics

    This 5 page paper looks at several novels and short stories that demonstrate the idea that socioeconomic variables permeate modern works of literature. Although characters go through spiritual transitions, it is money and status that is the crux of their challenges. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Short Stories by Jack London and the Weather Protagonist

    An 8 page paper which discusses how London used Mother Nature, the weather, as a protagonist in "To Build a Fire" and "Love of Life." Bibliography lists 8 additional sources.

  • Comparing Princess Diana and Beowulf

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts Beowulf and Princess Diana. Both were heroes for they sacrificed aspects of themselves for the benefit of others. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Analysis of Robert Frost's Poem 'The Road Less Traveled'

    This 5 page report discusses the short and apparently simple poem “The Road Less Traveled” written by Robert Frost that describes a traveler who chooses between two paths that diverge in the woods. it is clear throughout his writing that Frost also understood that the “order” of nature was such that it defined the very existence of a human being. The poem, “The Road Not Taken,” is an example of how he constantly frames the actions and thinking of a person against the backdrop of the natural world. It also suggests that one’s choices in life can be dependent upon what one sees before them in the natural world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner' and the Character of Paul

    A 5 page paper which examines the short story’s ill-fated young protagonist. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Status and Role of Women in 'The Iliad' and 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 9 page paper which examines the role and status of women in these classic epic poems of ancient Greece. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Canadian Literature and Violence

    This 4 page report discusses violence in Canadian literature and how it is expressed by Margaret Atwood in her poetry, Sylvia Fraser in her story of surviving incest, and Marie-Claire Blais’s story of poverty in Quebec. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Women's Literature Contributions of Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street

    This 8 page paper explores the concepts of feminism, poverty, and social structure from the Mexican-American perspective. In it there are discussions of sexual power, double standards, discussions of the Mexican-American condition, and examples of feministic thought. Three sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Mary Aswell Doll's Curriculum Philosophies in Like Letters in Running Water

    A 4 page review of the contentions presented by this author in “Like Letters in Running Water: A Mythopoetics of Curriculum” regarding the curriculum value of fiction. This paper contends that Doll is correct in identifying fiction as a conduit to student understanding of historical circumstances and relationships. Analyzes this contention using primarily the writings of feminist author Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Concludes that while a student might recoil if only given historical detail as it is presented in the common curriculum, when provided these same messages in a fictional format they are able to forge a connection between history and reality. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Analyzing Canto XIII of 'Inferno' by Dante Alighieri

    A 4 page paper which examines the suitability of the penalty of suicide, evaluates whether or not the punishment fits the crime, and considers Dante’s thoughts on the punishment. No additional sources are used.

  • Literature and Evolution Theory

    A 5 page research paper that examines the wide-spread effects of Darwinism on all forms of writing discourse beginning in the nineteenth century. The writer argues that Darwinism affected all branches of writing, from essayists to novelists, with each work reflecting the personal orientation of a particular author, writer or social philosopher. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • History and 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page analytical essay that examines Homer's Iliad in terms of how the details of the poem reflect the culture and beliefs of Homer's era. The writer argues that the works of Homer, regardless of whether or not Homer actually existed or if his account of the Trojan War is historical accurate, definitely reflect the cultural concepts, beliefs, and worldview of the time in which these epic poems were composed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • History and 'The Iliad' by Homer

    A 7 page analytical essay that examines Homer's Iliad in terms of how the details of the poem reflect the culture and beliefs of Homer's era. The writer argues that the works of Homer, regardless of whether or not Homer actually existed or if his account of the Trojan War is historical accurate, definitely reflect the cultural concepts, beliefs, and worldview of the time in which these epic poems were composed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • French Literature and Nationalism

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts two works in respect to its embrace of nationalism. Nationalism is defined. The thesis of this paper, provided by a student, is that nationalism is overtly expressed throughout both Baron de Marbot and The Storm of Steel through graphic bloody warfare and deep emotional despair. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of William Butler Yeats' 'Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites'

    A 5 page analysis of the wording and underlying meaning of this Irish pub song. The author asserts that Yeats’ poem encapsulates the idealism and the bitterness of the Irish Civil War and that it also encapsulates the societal stature in which the Irish robed their heroes, a stature which was sufficient enough to resolve them of wrongdoing as well. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of William Butler Yeats' 'Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites'

    A 5 page analysis of the wording and underlying meaning of this Irish pub song. The author asserts that Yeats’ poem encapsulates the idealism and the bitterness of the Irish Civil War and that it also encapsulates the societal stature in which the Irish robed their heroes, a stature which was sufficient enough to resolve them of wrongdoing as well. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature and Women of High Society

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts James's Daisy Miller with the woman in section 11 of Song of Myself. Social status and behavior are discussed along with a variety of thematic elements. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Lysistrata and Pleasure

    This 4 page report discusses the ancient Greek comedy “Lysistrata” and how it serves as an example of how, throughout Greek drama, civil unrest is often defined and framed in terms of gender and sexual conflict. For example, female choruses, the Furies, male supremacy, female protest and incest have all been used as dramatic vehicles to convey a variety of issues, problems and disasters, including war and the subversion of traditional morality and values. In this way, the theater served as the primary forum for civic dialog among the ancient Greeks. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature for Young Adults and Homosexuality

    This 6 page personal essay discusses homosexuality and the fact that it should be presented in young adult literature along with any other issue that will have an impact on a young person’s life. The author points out that there are people who think of it as a the most heinous of sins “against nature” and others who believe it is of no more relevance than the color of one’s eyes. And, of course, there are others who are convinced that they “aren’t bothered” by gays and lesbians but don’t understand why “they can’t just keep to themselves.” Each of these attitudes are attitudes which have evolved as the result of personal experience and belief systems, most of which were established before a person reached adulthood. What an adolescent or teen reads serves as an important component in shaping his or her beliefs. To deny that homosexuality exists r to declare it as a perversion or sin only serves to negate the existence of an entire group of people. No sources listed.

  • Timai, Aphrodite and Demeter's Homeric Hymns

    A 5 page assertion that these Homeric Hymns are exemplary of one particular stage in the evolution of the way the world viewed gods, religions, and mythologies. Contends that not only do these hymns provide a primary source of information about Greek religion and belief, their primary purpose is to explain how timai (power) was obtained by the Olympians. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'The Horse Dealer's Daughter' by D.H. Lawrence and the Theme of Control

    A 5 page paper which takes a particular scene in D.H. Lawrence's "The Horse Dealer's Daughter" and examines how it compares to relationships in the story. The scene involves the narrator's examination of horses, and how they may have little personality of their own and are driven and controlled by the individual with the reins. The paper examines this perspective and relates it to various characters, examining whether they have control or not. No additional sources cited.

  • From Pages to Silver Screen with Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Blade Runner

    This 6 page report discusses Blade Runner, the 1982 Ridley Scott movie starring Harrison Ford and Philip Dick’s 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? which “inspired” the movie. Looking at the difficulties of translating literature into film, this report discusses the fact that Blade Runner actually enunciates the ideology of the text rather than simply telling the same story. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Friendship in Three Poems by Sappho

    A 5 page research paper/essay that analyzes three poems by the ancient Greek poet Sappho. The writer argues that Sappho's love of beauty comes across to the reader, establishing a bond of friendship -- a feeling of connection -- between the reader and the poet that transcends the millennia. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Beauty and Friendship in 3 of Sappho's Poems

    A 5 page research paper/essay that offer analysis of three of Sappho's poems. The writer argues that while her verse is notorious for its connection with Lesbianism, there is much more to Sappho's poetry than mere eroticism. An examination of her poems reveals a deep and passionate connection with nature and appreciation for beauty, which are sentiments that reach across time and space and speak to the modern reader, establishing a feeling of connection and friendship. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Beauty and Friendship in 3 of Sappho's Poems

    A 5 page research paper/essay that offer analysis of three of Sappho's poems. The writer argues that while her verse is notorious for its connection with Lesbianism, there is much more to Sappho's poetry than mere eroticism. An examination of her poems reveals a deep and passionate connection with nature and appreciation for beauty, which are sentiments that reach across time and space and speak to the modern reader, establishing a feeling of connection and friendship. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The God of Small Things and Sexual Transgression's Dark Reality Symbolism

    This 3 page paper discusses this story and how sexual transgression sybolizes a very dark reality. Because two characters in this story who are of different castes have an affair, they are doomed to a series of ramifications based on the fear of society. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The God of Small Things and Sexual Transgression's Dark Reality Symbolism

    This 3 page paper discusses this story and how sexual transgression sybolizes a very dark reality. Because two characters in this story who are of different castes have an affair, they are doomed to a series of ramifications based on the fear of society. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Characters from The Bible, The Odyssey and Tale of the Genji

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts characters from all of these books, and examines their uniting characteristics. Although these stories vary greatly in terms of content, there are universal themes apparent in them all which serve to connect them. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Twentieth Century Literature and Theological Themes

    This 8 page report discusses the theological themes in: Updike’s The Christian Roommates; Roth’s Eli , the Fanatic; Lewis’s The Lion The Witch and the Wardrobe; Archibald MacLeish’s Pulitzer Prize-winning J.B.; Hesse’s Siddhartha, Shaffer’s Equus; and Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find and Artificial Nigger. No bibliography included.

  • The Secret History by Donna Tartt and Henry's Suicide

    This 5 page paper examins whether or not Henry's suicide was a noble gesture, or not. This paper excerpts from the text as support for the thesis. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • 'The Bait' by John Donne

    A 3 page analysis of this English poem. “The Bait” is a love story, a tale of two wayward souls which are briefly pulled together by a man’s infatuation with a woman. Interwoven in “The Bait”, however is a unique blend of tangible reality and metaphysical abstraction. This paper examines the metaphysics and symbology employed by the poet. No additional sources are listed.

  • 'Because I could not stop for Death' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Emily Dickinson's poem. The writer argues that in this poem, Dickinson presents a rather cordial view of death, which she personifies as a courtly gentleman. Her verse proposes that death entails an adjustment in perspective from the human state of awareness toward one that is universal. In other words, the poem describes a period of adjustment in which the speaker adjusts to a new state of awareness and being. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Because I could not stop for Death' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Emily Dickinson's poem. The writer argues that in this poem, Dickinson presents a rather cordial view of death, which she personifies as a courtly gentleman. Her verse proposes that death entails an adjustment in perspective from the human state of awareness toward one that is universal. In other words, the poem describes a period of adjustment in which the speaker adjusts to a new state of awareness and being. No additional sources cited.

  • Gilgamesh, Sir Gawain, and Their Representation of Moral Values

    A 7 page paper which examines how Sir Gawain better exemplifies righteous living through good deeds and altruism, as opposed to Gilgamesh, who values only himself and is concerned only with self-reward. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Robert Lowell and Bob Dylan

    An 8 page research paper that contrasts and compares Bob Dylan's song "Like a Rolling Stone" and Robert Lowell's poem "Memories of West Street and Lepke." The writer argues that Dylan and Lowell, having established themselves in a particular genre of their craft, changed the course of their careers by taking a different artistic path, much to the surprise of their critics and audiences. Lowell moved from the modernist camp to the postmodern and Dylan moved from folk music to rock n roll. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • William Wordsworth and Geoffrey Chaucer

    An 8 page paper which discusses Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” and William Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey poem. No additional sources cited.

  • Roles of Women in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

    A 4 page paper which examines the role of women in Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart.” Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Christian Dogma in Beowulf

    A 5 page essay that draws on the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf to argue that a close examination of the poem suggests that the Christian poet that set the tale of Beowulf to paper for the first time saw in this Germanic folklore the outlines of Christian dogma, with the consequent result that Beowulf fits the broadest parameters of a Christ-like figure, yet with undeniable pagan elements. No additional sources cited.

  • An American Literature Study

    This 4 page paper provides a study in American Literature by analyzing the work of William Bradford with that of Cotton Mather. This paper highlights their similarities, differences, the culture and history of the times, etc. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Los Angeles for Authors

    This 5 page paper looks at Los Angeles as a setting for The Day of the Locust but also touches on another work called Mildred Pierce. How L.A. is portrayed in literal geographic terms as well as its cultural geography are explored. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Drink My [Red] Blood' by Richard Matheson

    A 3 page analysis of the theme, setting, character, and symbolism. No additional sources are used.

  • Character Analysis of Nadine in the Short Story 'Water Child'

    A paper which looks critically at the character of Nadine in the short story Water Child, with specific reference to her isolation, her relationships with her parents and her ex-lover, and the impact which the loss of her baby has had on her life. Bibliography lists one source.

  • Women and Men in American Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines how two authors of American literature portray men and women. The authors examined are Ernest Hemingway and Kate Chopin. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Freudian Theory and The Scold's Bridle by Minette Walters

    This 5 page report discusses British novelist Minette Walters' 1994 book, The Scold's Bridle, and whether it provides a useful example of the theories of Sigmund Freud. The report suggests that Freud's theories are particularly applicable in Walters' story. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Short Storie Elements in Works by John Updike, Flannery O'Connor, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, Mark Twain, and Nathaniel Hawthorne

    This is a 6 page paper discussing elements with the short stories of Nathaniel Hawthorne (Rappaccini’s Daughter), Mark Twain (The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg), William Faulkner (Barn Burning), Willa Cather (Paul’s Case), Flannery O’Connor (The Displaced Person), and John Updike (The Music School). The sections each deal with two elements within the stories: for “Rappaccini’s Daughter” the issues discussed are when Rappaccini’s plans for Giovanni become apparent, and why Giovanni expresses such hatred for Beatrice at the end of the story; for “The Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg” the issues discussed are what weaknesses the stranger wishes to exploit in the town, and what kind of family quarrels ensue; in “Barn Burning”, the relationship between the boy and his father are discussed in addition to the conflicting feelings the boy has for his father; in “Paul’s Case”, Paul’s judgment of art is discussed along with the events which lead him to leave; “Displaced Persons” deals with why Mrs. McIntyre changes her mind about Mr. Guizac and whether or not Guizac’s death was an accident; finally, in “The Music School”, the character of Albert Schweigen is discussed and why he lives the music school. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • A Comparison of The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison and The Yellow Raft in Blue Water by Michael Dorris

    5 pages in length. Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye and Michael Dorris' The Yellow Raft in Blue Water share a common denominator of inner struggle amidst seemingly insurmountable odds. The social demands placed upon each story's characters speaks to the constant turmoil they experience as they move through their lives in a self-loathing fashion, forever coveting what others are and what they have. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Stories by Adam Haslett

    A 6 page paper which examines and analyzes “Notes to my Biographer,” “The Good Doctor,” and “My Father’s Business” by Adam Haslett. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • A 'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone' Excerpt

    A 4 page paper which analyzes a passage from “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” by J.K. Rowling as it relates to the truths of contemporary childhood. No additional sources cited.

  • Samuel Johnson's The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia

    A 4 page paper which examines Samuel Johnson’s “The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia” as it relates to the society of his time, as well as the timeless theme of searching for happiness. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Comparing and Contrasting Graham Greene's The Destructors and D.H. Lawrence's The Rocking Horse Winner

    This 3 page paper offers an outline, thesis statement and contrast/comparison of characters, themes and plotlines of D.H. Lawrence's The Rocking Horse Winner and G.Greene's story, The Destructors. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • English Literature and Love from the Romantic to Victorian Eras

    This 3 page paper examines the theme of love in English literature by specifically addressing the following works: Thomas Hardy's "Tess of the D'Ubervilles", John Keats "Ode to a Grecian Urn", and Robert Browning's "Porphyria's Lover". This paper provides quotes as evidence of analysis. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Motivations Behind the Banning of Books

    An 8 page paper reviewing three types of motivations for banning books. It appears that books are banned in the 20th century according to one of three categories of reasons: social, political and sexual. Banned books discussed here to address each classification are Mark Twain’s "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," John Steinbeck’s "Grapes of Wrath" and Judy Blume’s "Then again Maybe I Won’t." The reasons given for the banning of any specific book are never good enough. Two of the purposes of books are to instruct and to promote communication between individuals. Each of the books discussed here is well able to serve those purposes, but in many cases have been prevented from serving in such a way. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • 'Pet Cemetery' by Stephen King and the Acceptance of Death

    A 4 page paper which examines the theme of life and death through admitting one must accept death as seen in Stephen King's novel "Pet Cemetery." Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Lyrical Left Wing Greenwich Village Community

    This is a 9 page paper discussing the sexual politics within the lyric left from the Greenwich Village community. The New York Greenwich Village community in the late 19th and throughout the 20th century became the center for writers, journalists and artists all promoting ideas and lifestyle representing the political and sexual left including feminism, bohemianism, bisexuality, homosexuality and overall freedom of thought and action. Much of the writing which came from Greenwich was considered within the realm of the “lyric left” through the works of Jack Kerouac, Djuna Barnes, Sinclair Lewis, Willa Cather and especially Edna St. Vincent Millay among many others. Millay wrote a great many poems which not only revealed the bohemian and “radical sexual” conduct within the lifestyles of her and her colleagues but also commented on the fullest extent of feminism in which women can feel sexual desire and needs in addition to having control over their own lives and sexual fulfillment. At the same time, her poems also show the conflict which still existed between men and women and her own desire to overcome any restrictions carried over from the previous Victorian expectations. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • The 'Sir Patrick Spence Poem

    A 3 page essay that analyzes "Sir Patrick Spence," a medieval poem (author unknown) that was written in the twelfth century. The poet relates how Sir Patrick Spence set to see on the king's command and met with watery grave. The poem is a sea saga that is told in vivid images, which serve to connect the modern reader to the real human feeling of loss that is portrayed in the verse. No additional sources cited.

  • A Poetic Analysis of 'Homecoming' by Lenrie Peters

    This is 4 page paper meant as an explication of Lenrie Peters’ poem “Homecoming”. Gambian poet and novelist Lenrie Peters was born in 1932 in Bathurst, the capital of Gambia during the time when Gambia was still a British colony. The background of Peters and that of his country is important when analyzing his poem “Homecoming” as readers can better understand the climate in which he left Gambia to become educated and that to which he returned many years later. The poem “Homecoming” is among his collection which shows the corruptive greed of the tribal leaders while at the same time is balanced by “nostalgia for a pastoral past with cautious assertion of hope for a future built on that past”. Peters’ “Homecoming” writes of the sadness and strange shadows and skeletons which awaited him when he returned to Gambia to which he had “longed for returning”. The poem can be analyzed through several meanings including literal, connoted, figurative, imagery, allusions and tone among others. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Poetic Analysis of 'Homecoming' by Lenrie Peters

    This is 4 page paper meant as an explication of Lenrie Peters’ poem “Homecoming”. Gambian poet and novelist Lenrie Peters was born in 1932 in Bathurst, the capital of Gambia during the time when Gambia was still a British colony. The background of Peters and that of his country is important when analyzing his poem “Homecoming” as readers can better understand the climate in which he left Gambia to become educated and that to which he returned many years later. The poem “Homecoming” is among his collection which shows the corruptive greed of the tribal leaders while at the same time is balanced by “nostalgia for a pastoral past with cautious assertion of hope for a future built on that past”. Peters’ “Homecoming” writes of the sadness and strange shadows and skeletons which awaited him when he returned to Gambia to which he had “longed for returning”. The poem can be analyzed through several meanings including literal, connoted, figurative, imagery, allusions and tone among others. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature, Identity and Character Revelations

    This 3 page paper discusses the technique of character revelation used by an author. Examples are given from the last books of The Odyssey as Odysseus reveals himself to Penelope. Quotes cited from the text. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature of Early Africa and Identity

    This 4 page paper explores corporate and national identity in Sundiata and The Kebra Nagast. Background information is presented to validate claims and the role of religion in the works is also discussed. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Greek Literature as Reflective of Greek Culture

    This 3 page paper discusses the Greek culture as referenced by Plato in his Allegory of the cave. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Upton Sinclair's The Jungle and the American Dream

    A 3 page paper which examines the historical realities in Upton Sinclair’s novel “The Jungle.” The paper then discusses whether or not the Jurgis family has lived the American Dream. No additional sources cited.

  • An Analysis of Virgil's Depiction of the Tragedy of Dido

    A 3 page essay that examines Book Four of Virgil's epic poem of Rome's founding, the Aeneid, which relates the tragic love of Dido for the epic's hero Aeneas. This section of the poem pictures the course of Dido's love in five stages, which range from her realization that she loves Aeneas to her suicide, as his ships sail away. Throughout this narrative, Virgil pictures love as the equivalent to disease, an external force that subverts attention from what it truly important in life, that is, one's responsibilities. The implication in the poem is that Aeneas, being male, is better able to keep a proper focus than is the hapless, lovelorn Dido. No additional sources cited.

  • Guilt and Grief in The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

    A 4 page essay that discusses Alice Sebold's novel The Lovely Bones, which begins with the protagonist, a fourteen-year-old girl named Susie, stating that she was murdered on December 6, 1973 (Sebold 5). Each of the principle characters in the narrative react to Susie's death in their own particular way. With the omniscience of death, Susie describes this with crystal clarity from her perspective in heaven. Using this narrative device, Sebold is able to delineate the various ways that people react to grief, loss and the guilt that comes from remaining alive when someone dear to us has died. The writer discusses how each character reacts to Susie's death.

  • Six Stories and Lower and Upper Classes

    A 5 page essay that addresses six works by six authors: Orwell, Dostoevsky, Goldsmith, Goldstone, Huxley and Jackson. The writer argues that literature is, among other things, a reflection of an author's perception of society, its values and concepts of knowledge and truth. As this suggests, through the medium of literature, readers can gain insights about their society, and particularly its class structure, which they may not perceive in the course of their everyday lives. This examination of six works illustrates this principle, as each tale focuses on a different aspect of class structure, informing the reader, but, more importantly, causing the reader to reflect on the justice of taken for granted societal norms. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • t.s. eliot's 'The Waste Land' and Maud Ellmann's 'A Sphinx Without a Secret'

    A 3 page essay that summarizes and discusses Maud Ellmann's "A Sphinx Without a Secret: The Waste Land," a critique of the poem by T.S. Eliot. Ellmann begins her discussion of T.S. Eliot's poem The Waste Land by comparing it to a phrase from an Oscar Wild's story, saying that the work is an example of a "sphinx without a secret" (Ellmann 258). In so doing, Ellmann begins her detailed and insightful examination of Eliot, which looks at this poem from a psychoanalytical perspective, which favors a post-structuralist reading of the text. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Douglas Bond's Mr. Pipes Comes to America

    This 3 page paper discusses the book Mr. Pipes Comes to America by Douglas Bond. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Robert Browning's 'My Last Duchess'

    A 3 page essay that addresses Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess." This poem presents a dramatic monologue, in which a duke is discussing his art collection with the emissary of a family with whom the duke is negotiating the details of an arranged marriage. The duke stops before a portrait of his last duchess and begins to recount a story that is clearly intended to relay a message to the family concerning the duke's expectations for his next wife. In presenting the duke's diatribe against his previous duchess, Browning, in many ways, contrasts the restricted Classical worldview against the more humanistic Romantic worldview. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • British Literature of the Seventeenth Century Examined

    This 5 page paper examines the writings of Johnson, Marvell, Donne, Milton, Herrick and Herbert and describes an essential conflict that all six of them addressed. It then uses that conflict to describe the ways in which these writings depart from contemporary world views. Finally, the relationship between the essential conflict and various philosophical constructs is discussed. Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • Augustus' Rule and the Pessimism of 'The Aeneid'

    A 5 page contention that despite the fact that Virgil manages to maintain a facade of patriotism in "The Aeneid", the poem is in reality an underhandedly pessimistic account of Augustus' regime. This is true despite the fact that Virgil was writing under the close supervision of Augustus and was obligated to portray him and his regime in a positive light. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature and the Figure of the Vampire

    A 3 page paper which examines the endurance of the vampire figure in literature. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature and the Figure of the Vampire

    A 3 page paper which examines the endurance of the vampire figure in literature. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature and Epiphany

    A 4 page paper which discusses epiphany in literature. The works examined are Emerson’s “Self Reliance,” Whitman’s “Song of Myself,” and Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues.” Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • History Plays of William Shakespeare

    An 8 page research paper that discusses Shakespeare's ten history plays constitute a substantial portion of his canon. The main body of these plays cover the years 1398 to 1485, with two additional plays, King John and Henry VIII, forming, respectively, a prologue and an epilogue to this period (Sen Gupta 55). These eight plays offer a survey of English history that begins in the last years of the reign of Richard II and end with the death of Richard III. The following survey of Shakespeare's history plays looks at where they fit in the Shakespeare's conception of English history and their historical accuracy. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Spirituality and Storytelling in Beloved by Toni Morrison

    A 3 page paper which examines Beloved’s need for Sethe and for her mother’s storytelling. Specifically considered are the ways in which Beloved is nourished by Sethe’s stories, the experience of silence as a protective shield, and Baby Suggs’ spirituality as compared with the women’s spirituality in Alice Walker’s short story, “Everyday Use.” No additional sources are used.

  • Greek Literature and Blindness Symbolism

    This 4 page paper examines two works: Electra and The Republic. The works are compared and contrasted in terms of how the concepts of sight and blindness are utilized. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Battle of Frogs and Mice'

    This 5 page paper discusses the poem "The Battle of Frogs and Mice" and what it might mean for our age. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • An Idealistic Literary Vision of America

    A 6 page paper which examines the idealistic vision presented in characters seen in Amy Tan’s “Joy Luck Club,” F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby,” Anzia Yezierska’s “The Lost Beautifulness,” and Jhumpa Lahiri’s “The Interpreter of Maladies.” No additional sources cited.

  • Storytelling and the Film Adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates' 'Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'

    A 4 page essay. The writing of Joyce Carol Oates frequently addresses the predicament of being female within a patriarchal culture (Wesley 75). In her short story, "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" Oates again addresses this subject in a way that focuses on the cruel initiation into the sexual realities of male domination for the story's fifteen-year-old heroine, Connie. The film Smooth Talk (directed by Joyce Chopra, 1985) dramatizes this work. In many ways, the film remains faithful to the critically acclaimed short story, however, the director chose to alter the ending and some critics found this inappropriate. However, examination of this feature of the film shows that it fits with Oates' intentions in her storytelling and is, therefore, an appropriate ending to a superb film adaptation. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • The Environmental Writer Alice Walker

    15 pages in length. When one thinks of an environmental writer, the first thing that comes to mind is one whose prose sing the praises of trees, animals, the ocean along with the rest of the natural world. While that is the case in many instances of environmental writing, there is also another facet of this particular literary approach that addresses the environmental capacity of social issues, not the least of which includes racial and gender injustice. Alice Walker, considered to be one of the most identifiable of all environmental writers, gleans her environmental prose from a combination of personal experience and historical circumstances that have served to compromise the very nature of equitable existence between and among the races. Moreover, the way in which she employs a certain type of character to compensate for this gross lack of environmental equity speaks to the author's intrinsic desire to revise the entire premise of racial relations much the same way a writer submits revisions to a literary work-in-progress. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Interpretation of a Specific Passage

    A 3 page essay that analyzes a passage from Tolstoy's novel and discusses it in relation to the rest of the book. Tolstoy's epic novel Anna Karenina, after dealing with adultery, disillusionment, being social ostracized and finally with suicide, concludes with a life-affirming declaration by one of the novel's principal characters, Konstantin Dmitrich Levin. Examination of this passage shows that it successfully enforces one of the themes that Tolstoy has stressed throughout the course of the novel, namely the importance of family to happiness and a sense of meaning in life. No additional sources cited.

  • John Buchan's The 39 Steps

    A 3 page report on “The Thirty-Nine Steps” by John Buchan. No additional sources cited.

  • In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez

    A 6 page essay/research paper that, first of all, explains the real-life historical connection of this novel to the deaths of three sisters who were brutally murdered by the Trujillo regime in the Dominican Republic. Then, the writer discusses the structure of the novel and how Alvarez creates characterization by letting each sister narrate the story in turn. A specific passage from the novel is then analyzed. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literary Time Periods

    This 3 page paper examines several literary works and explains how they reflect the times in which they were written. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Fantasy Literature and Science Fiction

    This 3 page paper considers the idea that fantasy appeals to that part of our minds that doesn't believe in fate, but insists that everything that happens to us must have a reason, and whether or not that statement makes sense. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'The Poisonwood Bible' by Barbara Kingsolver and a Responsibility Letter

    A 6 page creative essay in letter form which examines what responsibility (if any) do individuals have to reach out to cultures and other individuals that are foreign to them and what responsibility does the United States and its citizens have to the world community, citing passages from “The Poisonwood Bible” to support the argued thesis. No additional sources are used.

  • 'The Poisonwood Bible' by Barbara Kingsolver and a Responsibility Letter

    A 6 page creative essay in letter form which examines what responsibility (if any) do individuals have to reach out to cultures and other individuals that are foreign to them and what responsibility does the United States and its citizens have to the world community, citing passages from “The Poisonwood Bible” to support the argued thesis. No additional sources are used.

  • Freedom Losing Out to Democracy in 2014 America

    This 3 page paper considers the novel America 2014 written in the style of George Orwell’s 1984 written shortly after the Second World War, is a criticism of the way in which power may take away freedom and liberty as a result of the manipulation of free in the post 9/11 society where the war on terrorism reaches an extreme level. The bibliography cites 3 sources.

  • 2 Versions of 'To Build a Fire' by Jack London

    A 12 page essay that discusses both versions of London's most famous short story. The earliest version, published in 1902, appeared in Youth's Companion and was written for a juvenile audience. London produced a second version of the story in 1908 and it was published in The Century Magazine. The second version of the story is famous as London's best work and is clearly for an adult audience. While the stories are different in both style and content, due to their intended audiences, both delve heavily into the psychological makeup of their protagonists and, in each, London describes the protagonist's perception in relating each man's fate. In so doing, London offers clear and perceptive insight into the psychology of risk-taking behavior for a young and older man, showing both the similarities and the differences in their perception of a dire situation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Early Literature and Poetry of China and Japan and Women

    A 12 page research paper. Japanese and Chinese literature, both poetry and prose, have extensive roots that reach far into their histories. This is especially true of China, which is the only country in the world with a literature, written in one language, which goes back 3,000 consecutive years. Throughout their long histories, these cultures have influenced each other. The following examination of Chinese and Japanese literature looks specifically at the significance of female writers in these traditions. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Simple Eloquence of 'I Wandered Lonely As a Cloud' by William Wordsworth

    A 3 page explication of Wordsworth's poem "I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud," which is a simple, but eloquent, depiction of nature that emphasizes how a moment of natural beauty can bring solace and pleasure when remembered. Wordsworth describes a rather ordinary occurrence, which is seeing a field of daffodils blowing in the wind. Yet, his artistry serves to use the very commonality of this experience to help the reader see a connection between humanity and the natural world. No additional sources cited.

  • A Review of The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down

    This 3 page paper discusses the book "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down" by Anne Fadiman; it deals with the consequences of a culture clash between a Hmong family with a very sick child and American doctors, and what happens when the two sides cannot understand each other. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Story Significance of Joyce Carol Oates's 'Black Water'

    A 3 page paper which examines the significance of the story “Black Water” by Joyce Carol Oates. No additional sources cited.

  • Review of Homer's 'The Iliad'

    A 6 page book review that summarizes and analyzes aspects of this classic epic poem. The Iliad, by the ancient Greek poet Homer, is one of the greatest poetic epics in history. This poem has held readers in thrall for millennia as there is it is a grand tale of heroic adventure. As time has past, its allure has increased due to the fact that Homer's storytelling prowess opens a window for the modern reader that reveals another time, an ancient era, with its mores, customs, traditions, beliefs and lifestyle illustrated in the lives of the Greek and Trojan heroes. In accomplishing this, the Iliad reveals a pagan world whose orientation is quite different from the Western world known to the reader. Thematic content is also discussed. No additional sources cited.

  • The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison and Pecola

    A 4 page paper which analyzes the character of Pecola in Toni Morrison’s “The Bluest Eye.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Advancing Age in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats

    A 5 page essay that summarizes and analyzes 3 poems by Yeats. In three of his best poems, William Butler Yeats addresses the age-old topic of mortality and the bitterness of advancing age. These poems are "Among School Children," "Sailing to Byzantium," and "Byzantium." These three poems thematically share and develop Yeats' thoughts relative to the loss of youth and the decline and decay of the human body contrasted against what is eternal in human experience, which is the medium of art and the striving of the soul toward perfection. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Advancing Age in the Poetry of W.B. Yeats

    A 5 page essay that summarizes and analyzes 3 poems by Yeats. In three of his best poems, William Butler Yeats addresses the age-old topic of mortality and the bitterness of advancing age. These poems are "Among School Children," "Sailing to Byzantium," and "Byzantium." These three poems thematically share and develop Yeats' thoughts relative to the loss of youth and the decline and decay of the human body contrasted against what is eternal in human experience, which is the medium of art and the striving of the soul toward perfection. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • First World War and its Psychological Impact

    This 4 page paper examines two works. One is a book entitled Regeneration and the other is a poem entitled How to Die. Each examines the difficulties to emanate from World War One. No additional sources cited.

  • Change Reflected in Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines how social, historical, political, and religious events from 1900 to 1940 are reflected in literature during the time. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Analytical Writing in Increase Mather and John Easton's Versions of the Death of John Sassamon

    This is a 4 page paper which compares and contrast the writings of John Easton and Increase Mather. There is no bibliography.

  • Paula G. Allen's Spider Woman's Granddaughters and Gordon Henry Jr.'s Light People

    A 7 page book review that addresses Gordon Henry Jr.'s Light People and Paula G. Allen's short story collection Spider Woman's Granddaughters. These works represent literature written in the traditions of Native America. While distinctly different, examination of these two texts reveals that they share commonality that speaks eloquently of the richness and diversity of Native American culture. No additional sources cited.

  • Dante's Hell and Characters

    A 5 page apper which examines where one would place various characters in classic/ancient literature in Dante’s Inferno. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Violence - the Monster that Torments Society

    This paper uses four literary works to argue that violence is endemic in society. Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, War Child and How to Tame a Wild Tongue are used to give various examples of violent behavior. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Violence - the Monster that Torments Society Examined in Literature

    This paper uses four literary works to argue that violence is endemic in society. Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, War Child and How to Tame a Wild Tongue are used to give various examples of violent behavior. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Violence - the Monster that Torments Society Examined in Literature

    This paper uses four literary works to argue that violence is endemic in society. Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, War Child and How to Tame a Wild Tongue are used to give various examples of violent behavior. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Faulkner: Spotted Horses and Barn Burning

    This 3 page paper discusses the way in which Faulkner handles deception in his short story Barn Burning and his novella Spotted Horses. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Hemingway's Turning of Tables in "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"

    In "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" it is obvious Hemingway was trying to understand the characteristics of being female. This 8 page argumentative notes how Hemingway often put his male characters within his own concepts of the feminine as a means of understanding them. He also put females in male roles, as in this story. The argument looks at binaries and growth out of them. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Shell Game

    This 3 page paper discusses the narrator, and the psychology of Chekhov’s short story “The Man in a Shell.” Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Considerations of Stereotypical Cultural Representations in the Literature

    This 5 page paper considers whether or not non-Indigenous writers should be prevented from writing about indigenous peoples. Bibliography list 1 source.

  • This 6-page paper examines an element of literature by using two poems and short story by John Milton (When I Consider How my Light is Spent), Robert Frost (The Road not Taken) and Sherman Alexie (Indian Education). There are 3 sources cited.

  • Kipling and Kincaid/Perspectives on Colonialism

    A 6 page essay that uses Kipling "The White Man's Burden" and Kincaid's A Small Place to discuss the different orientations on colonialism taken by Victorians and post-colonial writers. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Chaucer, St. Luke, Aristophanes and Their View of Social Issues

    This 3 page paper discusses social issues as explored in the Bible, Chaucer and ancient Greek comedy. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature Sampler

    This 10 page paper discusses four different fictional works, including two plays, Macbeth and The Hairy Ape, and two short stories, The Necklace and The Cabuliwallah. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Human Experience In Literature

    This 4 page paper compares and contrasts three stories that best illustrate either representations of common human experience, or are least representative of it. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Creature as Frankenstein’s Victim

    This 5 page paper considers the classic novel Frankenstein and argues that the real victim of the doctor’s obsession is the Creature itself. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Power Like Faustus

    A 3 page paper. Marlowe wrote Doctor Faustus sometimes between 1588 and 1592. This paper identifies the major themes in the play along with the possible additions by other writers. The wrwiter considers what absolute power did to Faustus and what it can do to persons in our society. The writer also comments on what legitimizes our own achievements. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature in America

    A 3 page paper which examines the American experience through literature. The novels examined are To Kill a Mockingbird, The Grapes of Wrath, and Call of the Wild.. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin

    A 6 page essay that first of all describes to the student researching this subject (in one paragraph) why the student's proposed thesis that Louise Mallard in Kate Chopin's short story "The Story of an Hour" committed suicide and why the writer chose the alternate thesis that she was murdered. The writer then offers an argument that explains and supports this thesis, which relies on the idea that while the murder was inadvertent, it nevertheless was the sight of her husband alive that shocked Louse into a fatal heart attack. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Orwell’s 1984

    A 6 page paper that discusses the character Winston’s development in George Orwell’s story 1984. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature from Australia - The Paradigm of Hell

    This 3 page paper, written in note form, considers whether or not the concept of hell in Australian literature is still relevant, looking at Australian authors and work based within and outside of Australia. The bibliography cites 7 sources.

  • Humanity Both Good and Evil on The Road

    This 3 page paper reviews the book The Road by Cormac McCarthy and argues that humanity is a mixture of good and evil. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • A Historical and Theological View of Urban Renewal in Lupton's "Renewing the City"

    This is a 7 page paper that provides an overview of Lupton's "Renewing the City." The correlations between the biblical book of Nehemiah and contemporary urban planning methods is explored. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Impact of Religion on Women in Post-Colonial Literature

    This is a 3 page paper that provides an overview of how colonial religious ideals impact indigenous treatment of women. Amadi's "The Concubine" and Conde's "Segu" are explored in this light. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • How Women Are Treated in "Sweat" by Zora Neale Hurston

    In six pages (5 pp. + 1 pg. outline) discusses how the author treats women in this short story of revenge in the characterization of protagonist Delia Jones. Four sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Literature and Film Related to Rural Life

    This 3 page paper looks at rural life through films such as Field of Dreams and books like Gone With the Wind. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature and Film Related to Rural Life

    This 3 page paper looks at rural life through films such as Field of Dreams and books like Gone With the Wind. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Death in Venice and Him with His Foot in His Mouth

    This 12 page paper discusses the characters of Gustav von Aschenbach in Death in Venice and Doctor Shawmut in Him with His Foot in His Mouth. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Meaning and Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines a common theme, concerning the need for deeper meaning, in literature as seen through Katherine Mansfield’s Bliss, Anton Chekhov’s Lady with Lapdog, and Virginia Woolf’s Modern Fiction. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Scarlet Letter Symbolism

    A 3 page paper which examines symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter. No additional sources cited.

  • Dante, the Inferno, and the Question of Gender

    This 4 page paper discusses the way Dante treats gender in his poem, The Divine Comedy. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • African Literature and the Importance of Generational Values

    This is a 3 page paper that provides an overview of generational value in African literature. Examples include "The Purple Hibiscus" and "Things Fall Apart". Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Warrior Culture of Beowulf

    This 5 page research paper examines the Old English epic poem of Beowulf in terms of what the poem conveys about the warrior culture of the Germanic tribes that were the forebears of the English. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Warrior Culture of Beowulf

    This 5 page research paper examines the Old English epic poem of Beowulf in terms of what the poem conveys about the warrior culture of the Germanic tribes that were the forebears of the English. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Historical and Cultural Differences in Photography and Printing in the East and West

    This is an 8 page paper that provides an overview of printing and photography in ancient China and in the West. Emphasis is placed on defining differences between the two. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • "Dune" and the Question of Female Empowerment

    This is an 11 page paper that provides an overview of female empowerment in "Dune". Arguments are made for and against the expression of female empowerment in the text. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Childrens Literature The 2011 Newberry Medal and Caldecott Medal

    This 3 page paper reviews the books by Clare Vanderpool and Erin E. Stead, the winners of the 2011 Newberry Medal and Caldecott Medal. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • My Mother by Kincaid

    A 3 page paper which analyzes mother and daughter relationships as they evolve through the dream logic of Jamaica Kincaid’s story My Mother. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Mending Wall by Robert Frost

    A 4 page essay that explicates "Mending Wall," a poem by Robert Frost. The writer argues that Frost envisions the task of mending the wall between himself and his neighbor as an extended metaphor that protests the blind acceptance of ideas. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock/Eliot

    A 3 page essay that offers explication of T.S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock." The writer discusses how love and romance are envisioned in the poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Langston Hughes' Blues Poetry

    In five pages this paper examines the interplay between rhythm, metaphor, and imagery in five of Langston’s blues poems: “The Weary Blues,” “Young Gal’s Blues,” “Dream Boogie,” “Listen Here Blues,” and “Ballad of the Landlord.” Six sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Langston Hughes' Blues Poetry

    In five pages this paper examines the interplay between rhythm, metaphor, and imagery in five of Langston’s blues poems: “The Weary Blues,” “Young Gal’s Blues,” “Dream Boogie,” “Listen Here Blues,” and “Ballad of the Landlord.” Six sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Houses in Literature and their Symbolic Value

    This is a 5 page paper that provides an overview of houses in literature. Examples from "Brideshead Revisited", "Rebecca", and others are used to show the symbolic value of houses. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Comparison of Poems by Keats and Blake

    A 3 page essay that compares "La Belle Dame sans Merci" by John Keats with William Blake's "The Divine Image." The writer first addresses their similarities by showing how both poems reflect the characteristics of Romantic poetry, but then differences are addressed by outlining the themes of each poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Comparison of Poems by Keats and Blake

    A 3 page essay that compares "La Belle Dame sans Merci" by John Keats with William Blake's "The Divine Image." The writer first addresses their similarities by showing how both poems reflect the characteristics of Romantic poetry, but then differences are addressed by outlining the themes of each poem. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • The World is Too Much with Us/William Wordsworth

    A 3 page explication of William Wordsworth's poem "The World is Too Much With Us," which focuses on Wordsworth's use of imagery and metaphor. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • "The last Night that She Lived:" An Analysis of Comprehending Death According to Emily Dickinson

    In three pages this paper summarizes and analyzes Emily Dickinson’s poem, “The last Night that She lived.” The bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Greek Philosophy and Literature: A Review of Concepts

    This is a 5 page paper that provides an overview of concepts from Greek philosophy. Literary examples are used to explain arete, eros, hubris, paideia, and logos. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Syllabus Design: 19th Century Literature

    This is an 8 page paper that provides an overview of syllabus design. A sample syllabus is created for a 19th century literature course. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Syllabus Design: 19th Century Literature

    This is an 8 page paper that provides an overview of syllabus design. A sample syllabus is created for a 19th century literature course. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Aphra Behn, Restoration Author

    A 12 page research paper that discusses the work of Aphra Behn, the first female British professional author. The writer highlights two of her works, offering an overview of her politics. The works reviewed are Oroonoko and The Rover. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Philosophy of Negative Capability in the Poems of John Keats

    In four pages this paper examines how Keats used technique to employ his philosophy of negative capability in some of his most famous poems. Two sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Analysis of Excerpt from Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

    This 6 page essay analyzes and discusses an excerpt from Toni Morrison's novel The Bluest Eye. The writer argues that this excerpt concisely sums up the novel's main thematic context. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • A Poem by Frost

    This 3 page paper provides an overview of one poem by Robert Frost, with a particular look at form, language, content, and other dimensions found to be engaging. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Explication of George Herbert's "Virtue"

    A 4 page explication that describes George Herbert's early seventeenth century poem "Vertue" (Virtue). The writer explains how the main point of the poem is the immortality of the virtuous soul. No additional sources cited.

  • Explication of George Herbert's "Virtue"

    A 4 page explication that describes George Herbert's early seventeenth century poem "Vertue" (Virtue). The writer explains how the main point of the poem is the immortality of the virtuous soul. No additional sources cited.

  • Does Studying Literature Improve Individual Writing Skills?

    This 9 page paper assesses the connection between the study of literature and the development of writing skills. Looking at the ideas of Orwell and Graves and considering the different ways in which writing may take place with differing motivations, the potential value and impact of studying literature is explored. The bibliography cites 10 sources.

  • Does Studying Literature Improve Individual Writing Skills?

    This 9 page paper assesses the connection between the study of literature and the development of writing skills. Looking at the ideas of Orwell and Graves and considering the different ways in which writing may take place with differing motivations, the potential value and impact of studying literature is explored. The bibliography cites 10 sources.

  • British Literature 18th vs. 19th Century

    A 9 page essay comparing 18th and 19th century literature. Writer describes themes, styles, and their relevance to the changing times. Most works discussed are by English authors including Chaucer, Defoe, and so forth. Bibliography lists 4 primary sources.

  • Hidden Self and Oscar Wilde

    A 6 page analysis of the theme of one's hidden self in three of Wilde's works: The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Importance of Being Earnest, and Lord Arthur Savile's Crime. The paper concludes that Wilde was desperately afraid of becoming ruined by public recognition of his homosexuality, and this fear is reflected in the emotional barriers erected within his fiction and plays. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

    A 6 page paper on Wilde's play in which the writer discusses the superficial vanities and prejudices of Victorian society. Important to this discussion is the meaning of 'Earnest' and in that sense, the title of this work. How Wilde uses wit and sarcasm to present relevant stereotypes and prejudices is well-explained. FREE outline included. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Comic Effects in The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

    A 5 page paper which examines satirist Oscar Wilde's use of comic effects in his play, 'The Importance of Being Earnest' (1895).

  • Analysis of Waverley by Sir Walter Scott

    This 5 page paper examines the 1814 novel, Waverley, by Scottish novelist Sir Walter Scott. Specifically discussed is how the novel qualifies as romantic, in terms of definition and the author's medieval concept of the term. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Holy Grail's History

    A 7 page paper discussing the sources from which the theme of the Holy Grail was gathered, and how the theme has changed over time. Sources discussed include the Mabinogion, Chrétien de Troyes, Robert de Boron, the Perlesvaus, the Queste del Saint Graal, and Thomas Malory. Bibliography lists six sources.

  • Yvain by Chretien de Troyes

    A 5 page analysis of de Troyes' tale on the subject of how pure love leads to transformation of the individual—where Yvain and other characters are representatives of both the personal soul and the community soul. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • A Summary of The Song of Roland (Chanson de Roland)

    This 5 page report discusses the medieval poem 'The Song of Roland' or Chanson de Roland and summarizes the plot, describes the poem's characters and their roles, and briefly discusses the 'ideal' behavior of a knight, as well as chivalry in the middle ages of Europe. No additional sources cited.

  • A Summary of The Song of Roland (Chanson de Roland)

    This 5 page report discusses the medieval poem 'The Song of Roland' or Chanson de Roland and summarizes the plot, describes the poem's characters and their roles, and briefly discusses the 'ideal' behavior of a knight, as well as chivalry in the middle ages of Europe. No additional sources cited.

  • A Summary of The Song of Roland (Chanson de Roland)

    This 5 page report discusses the medieval poem 'The Song of Roland' or Chanson de Roland and summarizes the plot, describes the poem's characters and their roles, and briefly discusses the 'ideal' behavior of a knight, as well as chivalry in the middle ages of Europe. No additional sources cited.

  • The Guest 3 by Albert Camus

    A 6 page paper on the short story by Albert Camus. The paper examines the story's plot, point of view, theme, protagonist, irony, and major symbols, as well as the influence of existentialism in this work. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Existentialism and 'The Stranger' by Albert Camus

    An 8 page research paper on Albert Camus's novel The Stranger. The writer details the existential themes of the novel, and relates them to the story and the text. The primary source is cited.

  • Knowing in The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant

    A 2 page essay of the classic short story, The Necklace by Guy De Maupassant on how Loisel comes to know many things in the process of losing a friend's necklace and paying for it. No additional sources cited.

  • Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville

    A 9 page paper on Tocqueville's conclusions as written in Democracy in America. The writer examines Tocqueville's views and analyzes the relevance of his observations in modern America. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Empirical and Rational Philosophies in Candide by Voltaire

    This 7 page research paper explores the representation of rationalist and empirical philosophy in Voltaire's 1759 novel, Candide. Specifically, these philosophical theories are examined as depicted in the text and in the protagonists Dr. Pangloss and Martin, as well as evidence of Voltaire's personal preference. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Evil in Candide by Voltaire

    This 5 page paper examines the struggles of Candide, which cause him to change from good to evil. Specifically discussed is how the violence which surrounds Candide impacts his behavior, and how rationalizes his actions in the name of survival. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Lautreamont, Apollinaire and Black Humor

    A 18 page paper discussing these two pre-Surrealist writers' use of black humor as an anti-war technique. The paper focuses on two of their works, Apollinaire's Le Poete Assassine and Lautreamont's Les Chants de Maldoror. It also features an extended analysis on the changing conception of the function and techniques of comedy through the ages. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Utopia and Hell Visions in the Works of More, Voltaire, and Sartre

    A 5 page paper discussing whether the three condemned characters of Sartre's play would have had a more productive life in More's 'Utopia' or Voltaire's 'Eldorado' (from 'Candide'). The paper concludes that despite the fact that the most famous line from 'No Exit' is Garcin's exclamation that 'Hell is other people,' Hell is really in yourself, and no physical Utopian surroundings can transform it into heaven. No additional sources listed.

  • Reaction to Germinal by Emile Zola

    A 3 page essay on the Emile Zola novel 'Germinal.' The writer details the main characters and the ideologies they represent, as well as some of the key incidents in the book. No bibliography.

  • Mining Women of 19th Century France and Germinal by Emile Zola

    A 6 page paper looking at some of the underlying social causes for the miners' strike described in Emile Zola's book. The paper, which takes the form of the report of a contemporary observer, concludes that change will have to be imposed on the system from without, as it is unlikely to come from within. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Frank Wedekind's Spring's Awakening

    A 5 page review of Frank Wedekind's play on teen sexuality, teen pregnancy and teen suicide. The writer posits that, as Wedekind so aptly points out, reliance on religious and other overtures in a society that is bourgeois in nature can only lead to destruction.

  • Frank Wedekind's Spring's Awakening

    A 5 page review of Frank Wedekind's play on teen sexuality, teen pregnancy and teen suicide. The writer posits that, as Wedekind so aptly points out, reliance on religious and other overtures in a society that is bourgeois in nature can only lead to destruction.

  • Women's Role in Dante Alighieri's 'Inferno'

    A 2 page paper looking at the fact that women's sins as depicted by Dante tend to be overwhelmingly of a sexual nature as compared to men's. The paper concludes that this may be because women in Dante's time were considered to have a limited sphere of influence, and their role was seen as primarily procreative. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • William Shakespeare's King Lear and Dante's 'Inferno' Compared

    In 5 pages the author discusses the similarities and differences between Dante and King Lear. ''King Lear' is a tragedy that was written by William Shakespeare. 'Inferno' is part one of a three-part story, which was written by Dante Alighieri. Although both stories are tragedies and contain great suffering, Dante is without a doubt the stronger of the two characters. The men share a commonality of fate stepping in and deciding their actions for them. Dante's fate, however was a much better one than Lear's was. Dante thought himself unworthy and Lear thought himself great. They were both wrong. Both men had eye-opening experiences. In Lear's case, it was too late.'

  • Roman Society and Culture in The Twelve Caesars by Suetonius

    A 5 page essay that looks at what can be learned about Roman culture from this ancient document.

  • Tragic Hero Oedipus in Oedipus the King by Sophocles

    A 5 page paper discussing Oedipus the King as a tragic hero, according to the definition set forth by Aristotle. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Changes in King Oedipus

    This 4 page research paper examines the changes which occur within King Oedipus of Thebes during the course of the Sophocles' play, Oedipus The King (or Oedipus Rex). Specifically discussed are his insecurity, his interpretation of nobility, and his growing paranoia which alienates him from nearly everyone who is close to him. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Character Analysis of Creon in Oedipus Tyrannus by Sophocles

    A 3 page paper that considers the importance of the character of Creon in Sophocles' "Oedipus Tyrannus." This paper contends that it is the one-dimensional characterization of Creon and his messages that most significantly impact the outcome of the tragedy. The primary source is cited.

  • Comparative Analysis of Phaedra and Jocasta

    A 5 page comparison of character and suicide between Queen Jocasta (Oedipus the King) and Queen Phaedra (Hippolytus). The writer argues that in both instances, the Queen was a lovelorn woman; deeply frustrated and in the end, completely desperate. Jocasta's death, however, was more sudden and rash when compared with the suicide of Phaedra who had accumulated such tendencies throughout the progression of her story. No Bibliography.

  • Comparative Analysis of Phaedra and Jocasta

    A 5 page comparison of character and suicide between Queen Jocasta (Oedipus the King) and Queen Phaedra (Hippolytus). The writer argues that in both instances, the Queen was a lovelorn woman; deeply frustrated and in the end, completely desperate. Jocasta's death, however, was more sudden and rash when compared with the suicide of Phaedra who had accumulated such tendencies throughout the progression of her story. No Bibliography.

  • Comparing Achilles and Odysseus

    In 5 pages the author compares the heroes in the 'Odyssey' and the 'Iliad.' Homer's 'Iliad' and his 'Odyssey' are both epic Greek poems. The hero in Homer's 'Odyssey' was Odysseus, and the hero in Homer's 'Iliad' was Achilles. Both poems were written by Homer, and many similarities as well as differences are seen between the two heroes. Although similar, those men were not carbon copies of each other, for they did have different characters. They were heroes first and foremost.

  • Differing Versions of the Underworld in The Inferno, Gilgamesh and the Odyssey

    A 2 page look at the differences in conception of the underworld between these three works. The paper notes that Dante's is the only one of the three works in which the Underworld is clearly punitive; in the Odyssey, it was simply sad, and in Gilgamesh, empty. No additional sources cited.

  • Dido's Character in 'The Aeneid' by Virgil

    A 5 page paper that reviews book four of Virgil's Aenead. This paper discusses Aeneas' duty, Dido's romantic passion, and the reason why this couple suffers such a tragic end. Also considered in this poem is the affect of Catullus' poem 64, and a comparison is made between the story of Ariadne and Theseus and Dido and Aeneas. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Dido's Character in 'The Aeneid' by Virgil

    A 5 page paper that reviews book four of Virgil's Aenead. This paper discusses Aeneas' duty, Dido's romantic passion, and the reason why this couple suffers such a tragic end. Also considered in this poem is the affect of Catullus' poem 64, and a comparison is made between the story of Ariadne and Theseus and Dido and Aeneas. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Dido's Character in 'The Aeneid' by Virgil

    A 5 page paper that reviews book four of Virgil's Aenead. This paper discusses Aeneas' duty, Dido's romantic passion, and the reason why this couple suffers such a tragic end. Also considered in this poem is the affect of Catullus' poem 64, and a comparison is made between the story of Ariadne and Theseus and Dido and Aeneas. Bibliography lists 3 sources

  • Carl Jung's Possible Influence on Grimm's Fairy Tales

    An 8 page paper that considers the popular Grimms' fairy tale using Swiss psychologist Carl Jung's theories the collective unconscious. Includes discussion of the composition of the psyche and various archetypes such as the self, the shadow, and the God-image. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper

    An insightful 3 page essay in which the writer examines what meaning Watty Piper's classic story "The Little Engine that Could" holds for a child and in retrospect, the story's psycho-motivational value for an adult as well. For the most part, the writer is concerned with similarities and dissimilarities between the ways that an adult perceives the story vs. how a child does the same. No Bibliography.

  • Joan Aiken's Children's Story The Wolves of Willoughby Chase

    5 pages in length. The Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken is an enchanting yet slightly frightful children's story that has held its appeal through generations of adoring readers. Craftily scenic and charmingly aesthetic in both its character appeal and atmospheric detail, the book offers young adults the chance to experience literary excellence at its best. What is particularly inviting about Aiken's work is that it readily keeps up the suspense without compromising either the plot or theme, which the writer addresses in this overview of the book. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparing Characters in Ghosts and Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen

    5 pages in length. Henrik Ibsen's talent for delving deeply into social composition is characteristically synonymous with the level of cultural implication the author incorporates into his works. 'Hedda Gabler' and 'Ghosts' are but two selections of Ibsen's writing that represent how a patriarchal society helps to eat away at the female characters' very existence. Caught within the never-ending web of gender bias, both Hedda and Mrs. Alving are forced to proceed with their lives as though they were merely extensions of other's, uneasily precluded from advancing their own interests. Also intertwined within the frame work of 'Hedda Gabler' and 'Ghosts' stands the issues of self-worth and the deflated value that each woman places upon her own importance as a result of male dominance. The writer compares and contrasts the characters of Hedda and Mrs. Alving. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Writer's Impressions of War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

    A 25 page essay that records the writer's impressions as this epic novel is read for the first time. The writer while giving a synopsis of the action discusses how the characters and plot are developed by Tolstoy as the novel progresses. No additional sources cited.

  • Music and Song in Latin American Literature

    In 5 pages the author discusses the trope of song/music in Latin American literature, addressing the work of various Latin American writers. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Carmen Laforet's Nada

    A 5 page essay that analyzes the book by Carmen Laforet. Nada is the first novel written by noted Spanish author Carmen Laforet. First published in 1944, some critics have regarded this work as autobiographical as it recounts the spiritual desolation of a country emerging from civil war. Many have regarded this work as a feminist reworking of the Bildungsroman or "novel of maturation." However, others have offered a contrasting point of view that the main character, Andrea, does not appear to adhere to this model of development due to her extreme passivity. The writer discusses alternate views and the essential symbolism of the novel. No additional sources cited.

  • Racial Identity Conflicts of Antoinette in Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys

    5 pages in length. In Jean Rhys's compelling novel about racial tension amidst confusion and anxiety, the author addresses this subtext in such a way as to portray Antoinette as a product of an intolerant society. While more of an underlying theme, the character's racial inner struggles in Wide Sargasso Sea represent a significance to the story's overall flavor and intensity, being that Antoinette is torn the entire time between calling herself black or white. The writer discusses who she really is, and why she is having such a difficult time coming to terms with her true identity. No additional sources cited.

  • In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez

    A 6 page paper discussing the changes the four Mirabal sisters moved through on their journey from the children of a middle-class landowner in the 1930s Dominican Republic to full-blown political activists. One sister never did participate, though she was sympathetic to the rebel cause, but the other three gave their lives and became more powerful as martyrs than they were in life. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Ancient Literature on the Life's Meaning of Moral Order

    This 7 page report discusses three pieces of ancient literature -- Homer’s Iliad, Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, and Aeschylus’ Agamemnon -- as examples of the relationships that exist between humanity and the gods. Each of the stories demonstrate the fact that the gods are who will determine the outcomes of humans’ lives, regardless of what humans do. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Differences Between the Novel and Film Versions of The Scarlet Letter

    5 pages. Normally when a book is made into a screenplay there are some liberties taken with the original story. This can be for any of a variety of reasons, and can only be done with the original author's permission of course. This paper compares the 1995 movie The Scarlet Letter, starring Demi Moore as Hester Prynne, to the book by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

  • Medieval Literature and Portrayal of Political Issues

    A 7 page paper which examines how two Medieval works offer us an examination of the political structure of the time period. Though the works do not directly discuss politics, they get a great deal of information across to the reader through such political examinations as gender, social class, and the issue of power. The stories examined are "Guigemar" by Marie de France and "Erec and Enide" by Chretien de Troyes. No additional sources cited.

  • Literary Analysis of Existentialism

    A 12 page overview of the literary classification of existentialism. Parallels the major components of this style with the existentialism approach in psychology, an approach which delves into our innermost characteristics to bring us to a comfortable relationship both internally and with those around us. Analyzes “The Innocents Abroad” by Mark Twain, “Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage” by Alfred Lansing, and “Cold Mountain” by Charles Frazier to identify existentialist components and provides a further comparison of the style to the Greek tragedy “The Odyssey” as a reiteration of the common elements which have been at play throughout history, not just in the nineteenth century. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Life as Seen Through the Classics

    5 pages in length. There exist a great many philosophies by which people live their lives, which ultimately help maintain order and a sense of direction that otherwise would merely drift in subconscious thought. Examining these varied philosophies as they relate to Benjamin Franklin's attitude toward achieving material wealth and rising in the world; Henry David Thoreau's argument for a more spiritual way of life; Ralph Waldo Emerson's insistence on the need for self reliance and thinking for one self even to the point of separation from others; and Nathaniel Hawthorne's sad portrait of Young Goodman Brown, one finds that the separation between and among these philosophies reflects the distinct separations that also divide society. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature Considerations of Global Issues

    The role of literature is to provide a mirror image of the world, its cultures and conflicts in a way that adds meaning and understanding to the processes of change and development. This 6 page paper examines Season of Migration to the North by Tayeb Salih; Survival At Auschwitz by Primo Levi; Wild Thorns by Sahar Khalifeh and Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad to explore the uses and devices of global literature. No additional sources are listed.

  • Journeys in Dante's 'Inferno' and Homer's 'Odyssey'

    A 5 page comparison and contrast of Homer's Odyssey and Dante's Inferno in relationship to the theme of their journeys.

  • English Literature of the 17th Century

    A five page paper which looks at a variety of seventeenth century English writers and the way in which they use satire, irony and caricature to effect social and political comment. Bibliography lists 9 sources

  • English Literature of the 17th Century

    A five page paper which looks at a variety of seventeenth century English writers and the way in which they use satire, irony and caricature to effect social and political comment. Bibliography lists 9 sources

  • Self Identity and Doug Coupland's Shampoo Planet

    This 5 page paper gives a brief overview of Doug Coupland's book, Shampoo Planet. The basic theme of self identiy and a search for self is examined and examples are given. Also discussed are the symbolism of the characters and the setting. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Poet Essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson

    This 5 page report discusses “The Poet” (1844) and essay by 19th century American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson. In it, he makes it clear that he has no use for those who he thinks of as “esteemed umpires of taste,” those who are unable to see beyond what is before them to the heart of the art and the beauty of its simple being Bibliography lists one source.

  • A Review of of Beloved by Toni Morrison

    A 5 page paper which discusses how Toni Morrison's "Beloved" presents us with the ghost of Beloved as a symbol of individual history and the collective history of a people. Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • Temptations in C.S. Lewis' The Screwtape Letters

    A 5 page outline of the basic theme of this book on Christian theology and the way that many try to undermine that theology through a refocusing of one’s attentions away from their religious commitmants and responsibilities and toward the more sensual things in life. Notes that they only way to overcome such temptation is to carefully maintain your focus on the Christian precept of hope and to recognize that all one needs to do to be ensured their place in the afterlife is to ask for salvation. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Naturalism and Realism in the Literature of the Nineteenth Century

    A seven page paper which looks at the concepts of realism and naturalism in fiction, particularly in relation to Howells' 'The Rise of Silas Lapham' and Dreiser's 'Sister Carrie'. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • D.H. Lawrence's 'The White Stocking' and Ernest Hemingway's 'The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber'

    This 5 page report discusses and compares two short stories -- “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber” (1936) bye Ernest Hemingway and “The White Stocking” by D.H. Lawrence. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • American Literature Trends

    A 5 page research paper that argues that the prevailing trend in American literature has been to question the concepts and assumptions that were prevalent in the past. The world view of past eras was predicated on the notion that some people, typically white males, were superior to others, such as, people of color or anyone female. American authors have consistently questioned previously accepted paradigms of exclusion and privilege. Furthermore, American literature has consistently focused on one of the major activities propagated by those who have power and privilege by questioning the age-old concept of war as something glorious and noble. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Ahab and Faustus, Deals with the Devil Seen in Melville and Marlowe

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the characters of Faustus, in "Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe, and Ahab, in "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville, essentially sell their souls to the devil. No additional sources cited.

  • Ahab and Faustus, Deals with the Devil Seen in Melville and Marlowe

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the characters of Faustus, in "Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe, and Ahab, in "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville, essentially sell their souls to the devil. No additional sources cited.

  • Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights and the Supernatural

    5 pages. Within the pages of Wuthering Heights there are several references to the supernatural. While this might not be a book that one would first think of as 'spooky' the fact is, these references make up a rather major theme of Wuthering Heights. This paper will expose this theme and use examples and quotes from the book in order to support the thesis. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literary Realism and Social Problems

    5 pages in length. The writer discusses William Dean Howells' "Editha," Kate Chopin's "The Awakening," William Faulkner's "The Sound and the Fury" and Toni Morrison's "Beloved" as they relate to Realism. No additional sources cited.

  • Sixteenth Century Literature and Parody

    The sixteenth century was the beginning of the Renaissance, where the yoke of the Church was being thrown off and the possibilities of science were balanced with a humanitarian outlook toward the future. Under these conditions, it is easy to see why the writers of this era would resort to parody in order to ask, "do we need to continue believing this message?" This 6 page paper looks at a number of sixteenth century works in terms of the use of parody. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Summary and Analysis of The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    This 5 page paper gives a brief summary of Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening. The ending is analyzed for content and intent of the author. Critical analysis is given to the suicide and its meaning. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literature and the Nature of Good vs. Evil

    A 10 page analysis that examines five classics from British literature and how these works characterize the struggle between good and evil. The works profiled are: Macbeth, Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde, Heart of Darkness, Fellowship of the Ring and A Christmas Carol. No additional sources cited.

  • Political Reflections in 'The Inferno' and Divine Comedy of Dante

    A 5 page overview of the primary structure and plot of this fourteenth century classic poem. Discusses the literary classification of the poem and the historical and political circumstances under which it was written. The author contends that while Dante’s work is influenced to some degree by the historical setting, it is not limited to a discourse on politics. “Inferno”, in particular, is considered the greatest medieval poem and holds many political as well as religious parallels. No additional sources are listed.

  • Political Reflections in 'The Inferno' and Divine Comedy of Dante

    A 5 page overview of the primary structure and plot of this fourteenth century classic poem. Discusses the literary classification of the poem and the historical and political circumstances under which it was written. The author contends that while Dante’s work is influenced to some degree by the historical setting, it is not limited to a discourse on politics. “Inferno”, in particular, is considered the greatest medieval poem and holds many political as well as religious parallels. No additional sources are listed.

  • Literature and Homosexuality

    A 21 page paper which examines E.M. Forster's "Maurice" and Radclyffe Hall's "The Well of Loneliness" as they involve conditions of homosexuality. Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Psychological Conditions

    A 10 page analysis of Robert Louis Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" as it relates to psychological conditions. Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Literature and How It Has Evolved

    This 5 1/2 page paper gives a chronological timeline of literature and its development. Reasons for the evolution of form, structure and use of literary devices are given. Representative authors are mentioned as well as their works. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses and How Death Was Treated

    5 pages. Examines the symbolism and treatment of death as it appears in Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses. This paper also contains contextual information such as the treatment of death by the Comanche Indians and the Mexicans of that era. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Law Cannot Alter Social Injustices in Harper Lee's 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

    A 5 page paper which discusses the book "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, illustrating how it indicates that no law can truly change the social injustices experienced by those who are the victim of racism. Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Flawed Characters in Death of a Salesman, Antigone, and Oedipus

    A 7 page paper which examines the character flaws possessed by characters in the plays Antigone, Oedipus, and Death of a Salesman. bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov

    An 8 page research paper that analyzes how Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" reflects the social and political situation in Russia at that time. The writer discusses how Chekhov foresaw the downfall of the aristocracy and the corresponding rise of the commercial/merchant class. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Assisi' by Norman MacCaig Analyzed

    This 7 page report discusses one poem by the Scottish poet, Norman MacCaig (1910-1996). MacCaig has been hailed as one of Scotland’s greatest poets. Balance is always a key point in MacCaig’s poetry, whether it is the balance between light and dark, man and nature, or man with other men. His skills of observation were also often directed toward the nature of identity and how one individual perceives him/herself and others. Such is the case with MacCaig’s poem “Assisi” that was published in his collection titled “Surroundings” in 1966. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Tragic Themes in Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, Sophocles' Antigone and William Shakespeare's Macbeth

    This 5 page report discusses the common themes that exist in these three works of literature. Great tragic literature carries with it certain common themes that define it as tragedy and which then allows the reader to understand that there is a greater story being outlined than just the one of the characters presented in a single story. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'A Family Supper' by Kazuo Ishiguro

    A 5 page analysis of Kazuo Ishiguro's short story that deals with a "family supper" that highlights the differences between the generation that fought World War II and their children, who have come under Western influences. The writer argue that this "generation gap" is particularly evident in regards to how the characters view suicide. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Family and Okonkwo in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

    This paper examines Chinua Achebe's book Things Fall Apart and discusses the relationship of the main character, Okonkwo, and his concept of family and tribe. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • An Address of Four Specific Questions in Literature

    A 9 page research paper that addresses 4 questions on literature. The writer addresses point of view in Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart"; setting in Chopin's "The Storm"; critical writing (analysis) on Jackson's "The Lottery"; and tone/style in Tan's "A Pair of Tickets." No additional sources cited.

  • How Shirley Jackson Employs Allegory in Her Tale, 'The Possibility of Evil'

    A 5 page paper which examines Shirley Jackson's tale "The Possibility of Evil" and illustrates how it is a moral fable wherein one should not try to fix the problems of others when the individual has their own problems. No additional sources cited.

  • Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century British History and Authors

    A 5 page paper which discusses how the authors, as well as poets, of Britain during the 17th and 18th century not only reflected the time periods but also influenced them. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Feminists Sylvia Plath and Cary Churchill and Their Literary Messages

    An 8 page examination of Plath’s “The Bell Jar” and Churchill’s “Top Girl” and the underlying societal messages. The author of this paper contends that each of these women’s work is largely directed at the injustices of a patriarchal society. The manner in which these women deal with those injustices, however, vary considerably. Each utilizes their personal experiences to form the basis for political critique. While Plath does so from the individualist perspective, however, Churchill approaches said change from a societal standpoint. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Italian Poet Giuseppe Ungaretti

    A 7 page overview of the work of Italian poet Giuseppe Ungaretti. This paper emphasizes the varied cultural influences which undoubtedly shaped Ungaretti’s style. Noted for his use of few and very carefully chosen words, Ungaretti could accurately be described as a literary minimalist and exemplary of the hermetic movement. Like the French symbolists, he looked at poetry much as one looks at music. Even single words, had musical potential and tremendous power. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • The Theme of Arranged Marriage in Fielding's Tom Jones

    A 5 page research paper that examines the disadvantages of an arranged marriage versus marry for love as pictured in Henry Fielding's eighteenth century novel Tom Jones. The writer argues that in Tom Jones, Fielding takes a firm stand against arranged marriages and, in so doing, dramatizes the disadvantages of this type of liaison. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Humor Used in the Works of Flannery O'Connor

    An 8 page analysis of four of Flannery O’Connor’s short stories (“A Good Man Is Hard to Find”, “Good Country People”, “Revelation”, and “Parker's Back”). The author of this paper contends that O’Connor utilizes humor to deliver deep and meaningful messages to her readers. Most often her message has deep and profound religious meaning but is made more palatable by O’Connor’s quick wit and phenomenal sense of human behavior. Her success rests to a large degree as well on the reader’s familiarity of the situations and circumstances. Without humor and without familiarity O’Connor would be a literary flop. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Analysis of Poems by Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and Carl Sandburg

    This is a 3 page paper which answers specific questions concerning three poems - Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening by Robert Frost, They Will Say by Carl Sandburg, Life by Emily Dickinson and Time and Eternity by Emily Dickson. There is no bibliography.

  • Playing in the Dark by Toni Morrison

    A 4 page book review that summarizes and analyzes the points made by Toni Morrison in her text Playing in the Dark, which deals with the traditions of American literature. Morrison begins her exploration of the literary imagination by voicing her intention to "draw a map...a critical geography" than what is typically presented in American literature (Morrison 3). This "map" is laid out in three sections that build upon each other, revealing a landscape in American literature that is largely unexplored and indicative of African Americans abiding influence on all things considered to be "American." No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Essay Writing

    A 3 page paper which argues that writing an essay is not very similar to writing a piece of literature. Bibliography provides student’s sources.

  • Italian American Authors and Three of Their Works

    A 9 page paper that is composed of 3 entirely separate shorter paper on specific Italian-American authors. These papers are 3 pages in length and have at least 2 sources in their bibliographies. The authors and works are: Giose Rimanelli's Benedetta in Guysterland; Richard Vetere's Gangster Apparel; and Anthony Valerio's Lefty and the Button Men (originally published as Conversation with Johnny). In all, the bibliographies list 7 sources.

  • Ishmael Reed's Flight to Canada and History

    A 9 page examination of history in Ishmael Reed’s “Flight to Canada.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Out Far Nor in Deep' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page research paper that analyzes this Frost poem. The writer first discusses the form of the poem and then takes the poem stanza by stanza to discuss the meaning of its images and metaphors, drawing on scholarly and personal interpretation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Poems for Children by Shel Silverstein and Robert Louis Stevenson

    A 3 page essay that contrasts and compares children's poems by these two poets. Being able to recreate the magic and joy of childhood and to do it from the child's perspective is a rare gift that few poets have exhibited. Two poets who manage to accomplish this feat are Shel Silverstein and nineteenth century author Robert Louis Stevenson. Examination of a representative poem demonstrates not only the technical virtuosity of each poet, but also the fact that each man managed to capture a child's narrative voice without talking down to their young readers, but rather showing empathy and understanding of a child's world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Culture in Alberto Rios's Nani and Marilyn Chin's Turtle Soup

    This is a 4 page paper which examines how cultural heritage is depicted in the poems Turtle Soup by Marilyn Chin and Nani by Alberto Rios. The bibliography has 2 sources.

  • Epic Poem Beowulf Contemporary Retelling

    A 7 page paper which retells the epic poem in order to be more easily understood by contemporary readers. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Fitzgerald's Literary Influences, and His Influence on Literature

    This 6 page paper examines the life and times of this prolific writer. How he influenced literature and how other authors such as Hemingway influenced him are issues discussed. Much information about his personal life is relayed . Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • The Life and Works of Emma Lazarus

    A 5 page essay on the poetry of Emma Lazarus (1849-1887) who is the most prominent Jewish American poet of the nineteenth century. Through her eloquent poetry and other literary work, she endeavored to express what it meant to be outside the mainstream of American society, to give a voice to the thousands of immigrants who were trying to integrate themselves into American society during the nineteenth century. The writer discusses 3 of Lazarus' poems. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald and Literature Influences

    A 3 page paper which examines the influence F. Scott Fitzgerald had in the world of literature and how literature influenced him. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Medieval Italian History and Literature

    A 15 page research paper that offers brief (generally 1 page) synopses of essays that deal with Italian medieval society. Then the writer offers a more extended analysis of parts of Patricia Skinner's 2001 text Women in Medieval Italian Society; a brief essay on Dante's Inferno and Otto of Freising's Deeds of Frederick Barbarossa. The underlying theme to the entire paper is how these sources contribute to the study of history. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Alfred de Musset's Confession d'Enfant du Siecle and A Hero of Our Time by Mikhail Yurievich Lermontov

    An 11 page paper which compares the autobiographical elements of these novels represented by the protagonists and considers how society’s ills contributed to a youthful loss of innocence in nineteenth-century French and Russian societies. No additional sources are used.

  • The Virgin Suicides Aspects

    A 5 page essay that consists of 5 one-page short essays that each address some aspect of the novel. Topics covered include social and psychological aspects a narrative that describes the suicides of five sisters. What the boys think of the Lisbon sisters; why Trip leaves Lux on the football field; Dr. Hornicker's opinion; the symbolism of the debutante party are discussed. No additional sources cited.

  • Mourning and Separaton in the Poems of John Donne and W.H. Auden

    A 3 page essay that contrasts and compares poems by these two poets. Separation from a loved one, either through death or prolonged absence, engenders the natural response of mourning. In his poem "Funeral Blues," W.H. Auden captures in metaphors the heart-wrenching experience of losing a loved one. John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning" also uses metaphor in order to offer solace to his beloved concerning a prolonged separation. In both cases, the poets capture the experience of mourning the creative use of metaphor. No additional sources cited.

  • Excerpt from The Silent Partners by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

    This 5 page paper analyzes "Working Conditions," an excerpt from Elizabeth Stuart Phelps's book "The Silent Partner."

  • 'Out Far Nor in Deep' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page research paper that analyzes this Frost poem. The writer first discusses the form of the poem and then takes the poem stanza by stanza to discuss the meaning of its images and metaphors, drawing on scholarly and personal interpretation. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Suicide in 'The Awakening' by Kate Chopin

    An 8 page paper which examines why Edna, in Kate Chopin’s “The Awakening,” committed suicide. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Modernism and Literature

    A 3 page paper which examines the literary movement of modernism. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Spirituality and Religion in Dona Perfecta by Benito Perez Galdos

    4 pages in length. The obvious implication of religious and spiritual intolerance sets the overall theme for Perez Galdos' (2004) Dona Perfecta, a novel about Spain's historic tendency to castigate those who did not fall in line with faith unity. Pepe represents the antiestablishment 'villain' who is not only proud of his personal – if not entirely outsider – beliefs, but he does not hesitate to express them, much to the chagrin of community outrage. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Robert Louis Stevenson's Autobiographical Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    A 5 page essay that makes the point that on the surface, there is little to connect The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde to the events that make up the life of its author Robert Louis Stevenson. Jekyll was English; Stevenson was born in Scotland. Jekyll was a scientist, a doctor; Stevenson a lawyer by education and a writer by profession, and, of course, the fundamental premise of the novel, which is that Jekyll transforms into Hyde, is in the realm of science fiction. However, if one looks below the surface and consider this work for what it says about Stevenson's Victorian mindset, autobiographical aspects begin to emerge. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Feminism and The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 6 page essay that analyzes Kate Chopin's masterpiece The Awakening. The writer proposes that the ultimate question in interpreting this novel to discern why Edna commits suicide. Scholarship has explored this question, and this body of literature suggests that Chopin's evaluation of patriarchy and its effects goes beyond a surface reading that defines Victorian marriage as restrictive and Edna's "awakening" as purely sexual. Close examination of this novel suggests that Chopin intended the reader to see Edna as being psychically scarred by her strict Presbyterian background and cold, patriarchal father. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Life and Works of William Faulkner

    This 7 page paper examines Faulkner's works to see if they are autobiographical; in addition, it considers his major themes, his contribution to literature and his style. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Education as a Key to Liberating Women

    This 5 page paper argues that both "A Vindication of the Rights of Women" and "Frankenstein" presents the idea that education is the key to liberation, both in terms of women, and for the monster in Frankenstein. It agrees with the first premise but not the second. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Poem (As the Cat)' by William Carlos Williams

    A 5 page essay that discusses the imagery in this poem. The poetry of William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) uses imagery that typically refers to everyday experiences and concrete images that describe material objects. Goodblatt and Glicksohn propose that comprehending a metaphor is akin to problem solving, "in its more creative form," and that this involves "an act of perceptual and semantic restructuring. Considering this perspective, this analysis focuses on the imagery that Williams employs in his verse entitled "Poem (As the cat," which offers a typical example of Williams utilization of metaphor and imagery within a short lyric form. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Romanticism, Modernism, and Victorian Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines literature and the development of literature as seen through the work of Mary Shelley (Romancitsm), Thomas Hardy (Victorian) and Yeats (Modernism). Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Examples of Classicism And Romanticism in Literature

    3 pages in length. The writer briefly summarizes each period, as well as provides an author for each example. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Love in the Time of Cholera and the Value of Marriage

    This 7 page paper examines this work and how it portrays love and marriage. Several quotes are included. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried and the Vietnam Draft

    A paper which considers the moral and ethical issues surrounding conscription, with specific reference to the Vietnam draft, and the way that these issues are addressed in O'Brien's novel, The Things They Carried. Bibliography lists 7 sources

  • Cultural Influences Exerted by the Life and Art of Robert Frost

    A 3 page essay that discusses the life of Robert Frost in connection with his poetry. Three poems are briefly analyzed and the writer relates what has been learned by this assignment. One of twentieth century America's greatest poets, Robert Frost (1874-1963), wrote verse that was not initially popular with the American public. For the first several decades of his adult life, Frost worked at a variety of jobs, and his family existed on the edge of poverty. He did not obtain financial stability and success as a poet until he was forty years old (Baym, et al 1762). Frost was a conservative poet who adhered to traditional forms and continued to write in the twentieth century the "kind of traditional poetry that modernists thought could no longer be written" (Baym, et al 1762). Through his remarkable use of imagery and also through his use of rhythm, which mirrors that of colloquial speech, Frost's poems often draw on the natural world to express complex meanings and nuances of understanding concerning life's major issues. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literary Portrayals of Blacks in Works by Eldridge Cleaver, Amiri Baraka, and Zora Neale Hurston

    A 3 page paper which examines how Hurston’s concerns about the representation of blacks in literature in her essay, “What White Publishers Won’t Print” differs from the concerns of Black Arts Movement writers Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones) and Eldridge Cleaver. These African-American authors beliefs about black arts and literature should be are compared and contrasted. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Children's Literary Classic The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams

    A 3 page paper which examines if this classic literary work, first published in 1922, still appeals to contemporary children. No additional sources are used.

  • Linguistic Analysis of Thomas Hardy's Poem 'Darkling Thrush'

    A 10 page linguistically oriented analysis of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush." The writer offers an examination of this poem that explores syntax, phonology, morphology, and lexicon/cohesion. Analysis addresses the poem line-by-line, sometimes word-by-word. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Linguistic Analysis of Thomas Hardy's Poem 'Darkling Thrush'

    A 10 page linguistically oriented analysis of Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush." The writer offers an examination of this poem that explores syntax, phonology, morphology, and lexicon/cohesion. Analysis addresses the poem line-by-line, sometimes word-by-word. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'The Battle of Frogs and Mice' An Ancient Greek Poetic Analysis

    A 3 page paper which examines the society and situation at the time as it is symbolically represented in the story, and specifically considers why the poem was written, who was meant to read it, the moral, and if it can be compared to any aspects of modern life. No additional sources are used.

  • Don't Bother Me, Mom, I'm Learning by Marc Prensky

    This 3 page paper briefly reviews Marc Prensky's book about using computer games to help young people learn. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Children's Literature and Authentic Voices

    This 3 page paper discusses whether or not authors who write about their own culture do so with more authenticity than someone who does not share their ethnic background. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • "Heart of Darkness" and "Apocalypse Now"

    This 3 page paper discusses the way in which developed nations tell themselves lies in order to justify exploiting the developing world, drawing on examples from the film "Apocalypse Now" and the novella on which it is based, "Heart of Darkness." Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • “The Tools of Empire: Technology and European Imperialism in the Nineteenth Century”

    This 3 page paper summarises the main arguments and message of “The Tools of Empire: Technology and European Imperialism by Daniel Headrick in the Nineteenth Century”. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • The Influence of Ancient Literature on Dante's Writing

    This 5 page paper examines a variety of influences on Dante, such as The Old Testament and Aristotle's works. Several works by Dante are explored. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Schlosser: "Fast Food Nation"

    This 4 page paper discusses what Schlosser says about standardization, uniformity, and conformity in the fast food industry on one hand, and nonconformist entrepreneurs on the other. It also considers the movie industry, which is becoming standardized in the same way as fast food. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Chopin's Awakening/Edna & Adele & Mme. Reisz

    A 3 page essay that discussing the roles of Adele and Mme. Reisz in Kate Chopin's nineteenth century masterpiece The Awakening, which tells the story of Edna Pontellier, a Victorian era wife and mother who rejects that era's strict interpretation of gender roles as she attempts to fashion a life as an autonomous, sexual individual and as an artist. Ultimately, however, Edna rejects even this alternative lifestyle and commits suicide. To aid the reader in understanding Edna and the motivations for her actions throughout the novel, Chopin contrasts Edna with two very different women, Adele Ratignolle and Mademoiselle Reisz. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • "Lanval" - Subversion of Gender Norms in Arthurian Legend

    This is a 4 page paper that provides an overview of Marie de France's "Lanval". The poem is analyzed in terms of Lanval's foreignness being representative of his subversive masculinity. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Hero and Leander/Marlowe

    A 4 page essay that discusses the homoerotic passages in Christopher Marlowe's sixteenth century poem Hero and Leander. No additional sources are cited.

  • I am Legend/Matheson

    A 3 page essay that discusses the way in which Robert Neville perceives his identity over the course of the novel. No additional sources cited.

  • A Look at James and Ruth in The Color of Water

    This 3 page paper examines these characters in the classic work. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Early Feminist Literature - An Examination of Themes

    This is a 6 page paper that provides an overview of early feminist literature. Stories included are "The Yellow Wallpaper", "The Interpreter of Maladies", "The Storm", and "The Chrysanthemums". Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Wharton's "Ethan Frome" and the Concept of "Duty"

    This is a 3 page paper that provides an overview of "duty" in "Ethan Frome". Other works such as "The Scarlet Letter" and the works of Do-Ho Suh are cited to provide illumination of the theme. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Langston Hughes, An Overview

    A 5 page essay that offers background on the biography of Langston Hughes and then discussion of five of his poems: "Bad Man," "Cross," "Let American be America Again," "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" and "Silhouette." Bibliography lists these poems and 2 additional sources.

  • Langston Hughes, An Overview

    A 5 page essay that offers background on the biography of Langston Hughes and then discussion of five of his poems: "Bad Man," "Cross," "Let American be America Again," "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" and "Silhouette." Bibliography lists these poems and 2 additional sources.

  • Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick

    A 7 page research paper/essay that discusses the main themes, symbolism and imagery of Philip K. Dick's novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, which portrays a futuristic society in a decaying post-nuclear holocaust world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • "The Great Gatsby" and Existential Values

    This is a 4 page paper that provides an overview of "The Great Gatsby". The greatness of Jay Gatsby is explored in existential terms. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • "Dr. Glass-Case" by De Cervantes

    A 3 page essay on Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra's "Doctor Glass-Case." The writer argues that this sixteenth century protagonist can be viewed as the quintessential Renaissance man. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Mrs. Wilcox and Margaret in Howard's End by E.M. Forster

    5 pages in length. On the surface, Margaret and Mrs. Wilcox of E.M. Forster's 'Howard's End' appear to be two completely different entities whose quests are reaching in opposite directions; however, upon closer inspection, the reader gains significant insight to the fact that the two women are truly more similar than even they realize. In spite of the fact that they come from very diverse backgrounds and expectations, both Margaret and Mrs. Wilcox are of the same constitution right to the core. The writer discusses how Forster is successful in illustrating the obvious separations or disconnections that exist within the framework of society, utilizing Margaret and Mrs. Wilcox as clear-cut examples of how people only appear to be different on the outside but actually harbor a sameness on the inside. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Daughters of the Late Colonel' by Katherine Mansfield

    A 5 page analysis of the short story by Katherine Mansfield. For a brief moment, a ray of sunshine lifts the spirits of Josephine and Constantia Pinner, the middle-aged daughters of the recently deceased and tyrannical Colonel Pinner. For that one instant, author Katherine Mansfield demonstrates that they are both thinking of all the ways in which their lives might have been, could have been, different--only to have them fall back into the habits that have ruled their lives. No additional sources cited.

  • Bell Curve Propositions Defense

    A 10 page analysis of the infamous book by Richard J. Herrnstein and Charles Murray. The writer defends the arguments put forth by these two authors and supports it with observation from Leon Dash's Pulitzer Prize winning account of a welfare mother. No additional sources cited.

  • Enlightenment Ideals in Common Sense by Thomas Paine

    In 5 pages the author discusses 'Common Sense' by Thomas Paine, and how this work reflects the ideals of the Enlightenment in both form and context. Bibliography lists one source.

  • Cultural Identity and How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent by Julia Alvarez

    An eight page paper looking at this multicultural novel in terms of its treatment of the issues of cultural identity and assimilation. The paper asserts that when immigrants try too hard to melt into one homogenous nation, they lose those distinctive characteristics which allow them to maintain their emotional and spiritual health. Bibliography lists two sources.

  • Analysis of The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

    A 3.5 page analysis of Toni Morrison's novel, The Bluest Eye. In this novel, a little black girl, Pecola Breedlove, longs to have blue eyes because everyone she has ever met, and everything in her environment, either consciously or unconsciously, has consistently upheld an ideal of beauty in front of her, and that ideal is white‹white skin, long blond hair and blue eyes‹the cultural epitome of beauty, which is culturally equated with being good. Morrison dramatically reveals what happens to a person's sense of self-worth when their individuality and personal appearance are totally negated by the society in which they live. No additional sources cited.

  • The Octopus by Frank Norris

    A 6 page analysis of this turn-of-the-century novel. The writer argues that the early-twentieth century novelist Frank Norris created a work of literature‹a work of art‹that also reflected the actual history of the state of California. Reflective of the school of naturalistic writing that was predominant at that time, Norris was intent on presenting a human story that was reflective the influence of the Californian environment, yet showing these influences within a context that touched on the relevant issues of the twentieth century. No additional sources cited.

  • The Wilding of America by Charles Derber

    A 5 page analysis of Charles Derber's book, The Wilding of America. 'Wilding' is defined by Derber as an epidemic of self-centeredness, competitiveness, and greed that has effects on urban and suburban environments as well as corporate boardrooms and even Congress. Derber shows how this is corrupting the nation's character and his conclusions are discussed. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Topics Covered in God's Bits of Wood by Sembene Ousmane

    A 1 page discussion that addresses the main topics covered in Sembene Ousmane's novel, God's Bits of Wood. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Erich Fromm's The Art of Loving

    A 3 book report which provides a detailed summary and critique of psychoanalyst Erich Fromm’s book, 'The Art of Loving.'

  • Retelling the Story of 'Bambi'

    A 1 page analysis of a Disney retelling of the classic story of Bambi, the young deer. The writer examines the story, which is based on the Walt Disney film, as it relates to the acquisition of language and vocabulary by small children. No additional sources cited.

  • The Bear Comes Home by Rafi Zabor and Jazz

    A six page paper on Rafi Zabor’s fascinating novel about a bear who plays alto sax. The paper shows how Zabor’s use of a performing bear as a protagonist is an allegory for the traditional position of the black person in the arts; it also describes the strong bond between the jazz and literature. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • The Bear Comes Home by Rafi Zabor and Jazz

    A six page paper on Rafi Zabor’s fascinating novel about a bear who plays alto sax. The paper shows how Zabor’s use of a performing bear as a protagonist is an allegory for the traditional position of the black person in the arts; it also describes the strong bond between the jazz and literature. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • A Review of Marling's Book, As Seen on TV

    A 5 page analysis of As The Visual Culture of Everyday Life in the 1950s by Karal Ann Marling. This paper takes the unusual form of answers to five questions that focus on different aspects of the book, which, collectively, offer a comprehensive look at this book. No additional sources cited.

  • Blue Sky Dream by David Beers

    A 5 page analysis of the book Blue Sky Dream by David Beers. In this book, Beers offers his readers an unusual combination of personal memoir and commentary on the psychology behind the Cold War. This unusual perspective is half autobiography, half political commentary. Beers pictures his family as part of the 'Blue Sky Tribe.' This is the term that Beers uses to describe the specific lifestyle of his own family as part of the aerospace industry, and also the optimistic perspective of American culture in the decades following World War II. No additional sources cited.

  • Richard Wright's Black Boy and William Faulkner's Light in August and Black Identity

    A six page paper comparing the protagonists of these two works (by William Faulkner and Richard Wright respectively) in terms of their racial identities, and their reactions to them. The paper asserts that it is very difficult to establish a positive racial identity when one’s race is constantly disparaged by society as a whole, and this has made both protagonists extremely hostile. Bibliography lists five sources.

  • Language Uses in Julia Alvarez's How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and Toni Morrison's Sula

    A 7 page comparison of Julia Alvarez' How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and Toni Morrison's Sula. The writer addresses how these two authors use language within these works. No additional sources cited.

  • Cannibals and Kings by Marvin Harris

    A 5 page analysis that examines Cannibals and Kings: the Origins of Cultures by Marvin Harris. The writer demonstrates that Harris offers some intriguing ideas relative to the way that early man developed in response to environmental forces. Harris' book covers a wide-ranging variety of topics. In so doing, he often presents a perspective on history that is non-traditional. Nevertheless, Harris provides some very persuasive arguments that leave the reader with much to consider relative to the technologically oriented path of Western society. No additional sources cited.

  • Of Mice and Men vs. The Pearl

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts John Steinbeck’s short novels, 'The Pearl' & 'Of Mice & Men,' and also provides some biographical information on the author, including a brief discussion of some of his other works and some of the writing awards Steinbeck received. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Western Classical Literature and Women

    A five page look at the role women have played in Western literature from the Old Testament through the Greeks and Romans through the Middle Ages and early Renaissance to the Romantic era. Works discussed include the Bible: Homer's Iliad and Odyssey; Aeschylus' Agamemnon; Euripides' Medea; Virgil's Aeneid; Dante's Inferno; the works of Petrarch; Cervantes' Don Quixote; and Goethe's Faust. Bibliography lists two sources.

  • Theater Components

    This 5 page paper considers the components of setting, plot, character and audience participation which may be included in all typesof theater to varying degrees. One might say that all of these elements build upon each other. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio

    A 5 page research paper that examines The Decameron, by fourteenth century Italian storyteller, poet and humanist Giovanni Boccaccio. The writer argues that this work serves as a window in time that reveals to modern readers the world of the Middle Ages and the horror that engulfed that world with the coming of the Black Death, as well as the social changes that this instigated. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Jo Ann Mort's Not Your Father's Union Movement

    This 5 page paper presents an example book review of Jo-Ann Mort’s anthology on the AFL-CIO. The compilation of writings includes a variety of topics including those pertinent to American politics as well as those which affect workers abroad. No additional sources cited.

  • Smell Imagery in Surfacing by Margaret Atwood

    A 5 page analysis of Margaret Atwood's novel Surfacing, a psychologically oriented novel that describes how the unnamed narrator seeks unity and reanimation of the parts of her psyche that she suppressed in order to survive. This is a complex novel, which is permeated with multiple layers of meaning, but it is basically the story of a fragmented woman becoming whole again. In relating this journey, the writer argues that Atwood relies heavily on imagery that focuses on the narrator's heightened senses, and—particularly—on her sense of smell. No additional sources cited.

  • Analysis of Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson

    This 5 page paper focuses on the thematic choices of this author (Jeanette Winterson) whose novel focuses on sexuality. Major themes are homosexuality and religion. The protagonist is also a focus of the analysis. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature, Society, and the Individual

    This 7 page paper explores this theme in light of the following five works: Antigone, Utopia, Brave New World, The War of the Worlds and Herald. Context is discussed as well as applicability in today’s society. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes by Maya Angelou

    A 5 page analysis of All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes by Maya Angelou, which is the fifth volume in her serial autobiography. This volume is an account of Angelou's experiences in Ghana in the early 1960s. This narrative relates how Angelou found a job teaching at the University of Ghana and began working as an editor. While the narrative naturally includes the details of where Angelou worked, and the major details of her life, the motivating force behind the book is how Angelou worked to relate emotionally to Ghana and her African heritage. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Before the Birth of One of Her Children' by Anne Bradshaw

    A 5 page analysis of this poem by early American poet Anne Bradstreet. The writer argues that Bradstreet appears to be trying to influence how her husband might react if the outcome her impending childbirth should be her own death. In doing so, Bradstreet demonstrates much of her own nature, her concern for her children, and, above all, the love that she holds for her husband. No additional sources cited.

  • Constructing Knowledge and Feminist Theory

    8 pages in length. Lorraine Code's 'What Can She Know?' is a celebration of gender, with particular emphasis upon issues of feminism and patriarchal control. Indeed, Code portrays the perpetuation of feminism; not only are her writings a solid reflection of her sentiments of a lacking Anglo-American epistemology but so is the manner in which she reflects the female reawakening. Code displays her craft well and does not hesitate to apply her talent as more of a social statement than one of mere entertainment. Thus is the case with her ongoing assertion that there was truly no separation of the sexes in reality, short of the obvious physical differences; rather, her perpetual argument clearly makes the point that the female gender -- no matter how seemingly fragile and delicate -- is indeed just as much an emotionally strong and self-reliant individual as her socially-accepted male counterpart. The writer discusses Code's book as it relates to feminism and patriarchy. No additional sources cited.

  • Novels of Danielle Steel

    6 pages in length. The writer briefly discusses a common theme among nine of Steel's novels: Daddy, The Gift, Five Days In Paris, Silent Honor, The Ranch, Special Delivery, The Long Road Home, Mirror Image and Bittersweet. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Miss Brill' by Katherine Mansfield

    In 5 pages, the author discusses Katherine Mansfield's "Miss Brill." Miss Brill is portrayed as naïve about life, and not objective about herself. No other sources are cited.

  • El Indio by Gregorio Lopez Y Fuentes

    3 pages in length. Gregorio Lopez y Fuentes' 1937 novel El Indio strives to represent many things at once: political mistreatment, ethnic intolerance and cultural ignorance. While on the surface the story appears as yet another narration with regard to Western European overtaking of Indian land, it is significantly much more than that. Indeed, there exists plenty of references – both obvious and subliminal – that effectively address what truly did occur between the colonists and the indigenous population; however, the writer discusses that through the author's insight, the reader gains a considerable amount of knowledge about what occurred during this clash of culture. No additional sources cited.

  • El Llano en Llamas by Juan Rulfo

    3 pages in length. "El Llano En Llamas" by Juan Rulfo's is indicative of the prolific writer's inherent ability to pursue even the most complex of concepts. Not unlike myriad other works of this genre, Rulfo appeals to the innermost recesses of the reader's soul by reaching out and inviting his audience to experience with him the sometimes intense and often expansive sense of being during the Mexican Revolution. The writer discusses how the novelist demonstrates a distinctive talent when it comes to writing about the inherent difficulties associated with Western European settlement and the blatant disregard for humanity. No additional sources cited.

  • Mi Caballo, Mi Perro Y Mi Rifle by Jose Ruben Romero

    3 pages in length. Jose Ruben Romero's "Mi Caballo, Mi Perro Y Mi Rifle" delves into the lurid history of Western European conquest over the Mexican Indians. Clearly portrayed throughout the pages of Romero's historical account is the white man's opinion that if one was not a of European descent, one was not worthy of living. The writer discusses how this obvious cultural hatred harbored by the white race was focused toward the Indians for the unprovoked manner in which they attempted to preserve their indigenous land. No additional sources cited.

  • El Gesticulador Y Otras Obras De Teatro by Rodolfo Usigli

    3 pages in length. The obvious importance of Rodolfo Usigli's "El Gesticulador Y Otras Obras De Teatro" is the author's quest to reconstruct Mexican history as it has been documented throughout the past. In assessing the particular importance of Usigli's motivation behind re-writing the revolutionary past is its seemingly unrelated association to contemporary society. The writer discusses how post-colonialism was a reaction to and a critique of the colonial dichotomy, inasmuch as there existed a defiant urge to do away with the overwhelming oppression of involuntary change. No additional sources cited.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises and New Value Search

    An 8 page paper which discusses how, with the use of characterization, symbolism, and the narrator, Ernest Hemmingway illustrates how people are searching for new values in their lives. They are searching for new values in their lives because many of the old ones were destroyed along with the war. Bibliography lists 6 additional sources.

  • Social Prejudice in Beloved by Toni Morrison and The Castles Of Athlin And Dunbayne by Anne Radcliffe

    5 pages in length. Assessing the prejudicial differences that exist between Anne Radcliffe's 'The Castles Of Athlin And Dunbayne' and Toni Morrison's 'Beloved' is to address the issue of social class. The reality of Scottish white privilege as it is bestowed upon Radcliffe's Mary is entirely separate and apart from the ravages of Morrison's enslaved Sethe. The writer discusses that the manner by which each character is influenced by prejudice of social class implores the reader to envision the glaring contrarieties between a white British woman a black African American female. No additional sources cited.

  • African American Theater and Blues and the Influential Works of Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes

    A 10 page paper which examines the influences provided by poet Langston Hughes and novelist/short-story writer Zora Neale Hurston on African-American blues and theater, by comparing and contrasting their perspectives, through such works as (among others), Hughes' 'The Weary Blues' and 'Po' Boy Blues' and Hurston's short story, 'How It Feels to Be Colored Me,' and the novel, 'Their Eyes Were Watching God.' Bibliography lists 13 sources.

  • 'The Gift Outright' by Robert Frost

    This 6 page report discusses 1942 poem by Robert Frost titled “The Gift Outright.” He recited it at the inauguration ceremony for President John F. Kennedy in 1961. The poem opens by describing the fact that the early settlers in the North American colonies thought of the land they were cultivating as simply “their” land and continues in only 16 lines to show the connection between Americans and the land mass that is the United States. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • H.G. Bissinger's Friday Night Lights A Town, a Team, a Dream

    A 5 page discussion of the underlying philosophy of win-win at any costs which author Bissinger exposes has resulted in significant social problems in Odessa Texas, the home of the Permian Panthers. At the same time, however, this philosophy is not unique to Odessa. It permeates high school sports across the nation and has the potential for phenomenal societal costs. No additional sources are listed.

  • 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence, 'Everyday Use' by Alice Walker and Families

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts the families in Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” and D.H. Lawrence’s “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” No additional sources cited.

  • Blues Music and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

    A 5 page paper which examines the power of music, the blues, in Toni Morrison’s “The Bluest Eye.” Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel

    A 5 page analyzes that examines how Esquivel's novel resembles a fairy tale and the significance of this resemblance. The writer argues that the story is similar to a fairy tale in that it presents a story that carries the power of myth. This is evident in the manner in which it portrays women and their relationship to the domestic sphere, while also offering a template for female identification that departs from the restrictions inherent in that role. No additional sources cited.

  • Portrayals of Good Science Gone Bad in Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, H.G. Wells, and Mary Shelley

    A 10 page overview of the factors which existed in the Victorian era to spawn such works as “The Island of Doctor Moreau” and “The Invisible Man”, “Frankenstein” and “Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde”. This paper describes the quest for understanding and scientific experimentation which captivated this era and speculates as to how this captivation extended to the literary world as well. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Transformations in the Works of Chinua Achebe and Franz Kafka

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart. The writer argues that while these two narratives are very different, in both works, the authors address issues of transformation in regards to how individuals adapt, or fail to adapt, to challenge in their culture. No additional sources cited.

  • Works of Literature and Race

    This 5 page paper discusses the issue of race in the books of Salman Rushdie and George Lamming (Midnight's Children, and In the Castle of My Skin). Examples and quotes, cited and listed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Character Analysis of the Prince in Giuseppe Lampedusa's The Leopard

    This 9 page paper discusses Giuseppe Lampedusa's novel, The Leopard. Emphasis is placed on the character analysis of the Prince and the theme of the novel. A brief overview is included. Quotes and examples given. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Downfall of Okonkwo in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

    An 8 page research paper that focuses on the character of Okonkwo in Chinus Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart. The writer examines how much of Okonkwo's downfall is due to his own character and how this relates to Igbo society in general. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Terry Kay's To Dance with the White Dog

    This paper discusses the book by Southern writer, Terry Kay. Issues of psychology, death, dying, process of aging, as well as parallels between aging as an adult and aging as a child are drawn. Synopsis included, as well as theme analysis. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Modern Native American Literature and Cultural Conflict

    An 11 page discussion of cultural conflict as is evidenced in Thomas King’s “Green Grass, Running Water”, Leslie Marmon Silko’s “Ceremony”, Gerald Vizenor’s “The Heirs of Columbus”, and Sherman Alexie’s “The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven”. The author notes the underlying theme of the differences in the way the environment is viewed by Native Americans verses Non-Natives and suggests that in pre-contact cultures the villain in Native American stories took the form of witchcraft while in contemporary literature it takes the form of non-Natives. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature and Class Division

    This 5 page paper provides an overview of two stories--Maupassant's The Necklace and Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground--and looks at how class plays out in each. The problem of class in society is also discussed in general. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Sex

    This 5 page paper discusses the function and use of the sexual encounter in three novels: Tender is the Night(Fitzgerald), Mourning Becomes Electra(O'Neill), and McNally's Love, Honor, Valour. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature and Sex

    This 5 page paper discusses the function and use of the sexual encounter in three novels: Tender is the Night(Fitzgerald), Mourning Becomes Electra(O'Neill), and McNally's Love, Honor, Valour. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Early Modern Culture and Dr. Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 7 page research paper that examines the connections between Christopher Marlowe's play and the early modern period in which it was written. The writer discusses the ways in which the play reflects the thinking and theology of this period. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Analyzing 'The History Man' by Malcolm Bradbury

    This is a 10 page paper analyzing Malcolm Bradbury’s “The History Man”. “The History Man” (1975) by Malcolm Bradbury was considered by many an introduction to a new genre called “the campus novel”. The novel explored the academic and personal life of the main character, Howard Kirk, and his colleagues and students as the charismatic teacher taught his sociological perspectives on life and developed a certain scoundrel reputation as a manipulative and exploitive instructor in the satire fun-filled novel. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Novel Essays by George Lukacs and Virginia Woolf

    A 5 page essay that contrasts essays by Virginia Woolf ("Modern Fiction") and George Lukacs ("The Ideology of Modernism") and how these essays pertain to the statement that "works of literature are windows in the unconscious lives of authors and readers alike." The writer argues that this statement is particularly appropriate to the modern literature discussed by Woolf and Lukacs. No additional sources cited.

  • Wisdom's Message in One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and in the Mahabharata

    This 8 page paper considers the way in which these two texts, although written millennia apart, both communicate a message regarding the meaning and application of wisdom and that gather of knowledge is not the same as wisdom. The bibliography cites 2 sources.

  • Child and Adult Voices in Literature for Children

    A nine page paper which looks at the significance of the adult and child voice in three works of children's literature: Alice in Wonderland, Little Women and The Secret Garden. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Apocalyptic Literature

    This 9 page paper compares and contrasts old and new apocalyptic literature. The bible is discussed along with Nostradamus . The New Age movement is highlighted. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Eighteenth Century British Literature and Women

    This 8 page paper discusses the role of women in 18th century British literature. This paper refers to "Evelina" and "Roxana". Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature, Ceremony, and Ritual

    This seven page paper discusses the use of ceremony and ritual in the works of Hemingway (Sun Also Rises) and Leslie Silko (Ceremony). Examples are cited from text. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Twentieth Century Literature and Gender

    This 7 page paper looks at gender, but also at class and race, in two works that focus on strong women who lived in the United States during the early part of the twentieth century. Hurston's Their eyes were watching God and Wharton's House of Mirth are each discussed. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • William Bradford and Captain John Smith as Examples of American Colonial Writers

    This is a 5 page paper comparing the writers Captain John Smith and William Bradford. Early colonial American writers were known for their optimistic look at the new world and described America as not only the new world but as pure, virgin and a place for opportunity and dreams. Their writings reflected the colonist view away from the restrictions of British society. Captain John Smith was considered one of the first historians ever to document the colonists’ experiences in his writings about his time at Jamestown and his travels throughout New England. Using a fairly simple and open narrative, he provided detailed maps and descriptions of the areas in addition to adventurous tales of his own and others. William Bradford who was one of the original arrivals in Plymouth on the Mayflower also wrote of his experiences in the new world but his text was based largely on his Puritan faith and compared their quest heavily to that of Paul’s in the Bible. Despite Bradford’s more sober style of writing, he also saw the new world as a land of opportunity as did Smith and the other colonists. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Greco Roman Literary Works and Heroism

    This 12 page paper discusses the evolution of the hero figure in the classical Greco-Roman literature of Homer and Sophocles. The plays/stories of Antigone, Oedipus Rex, The Odyssey, The Illiad, are given a brief overview as well as analyzed for the hero's characteristics. Also included are the heroic depictions of women heroes in the stories. Specific qualities of heroes discussed and exampled. All quotes pulled from text and cited. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Money in 'The Lame Shall Enter First' by Flannery O'Connor and 'The Rocking Horse Winner by D.H. Lawrence

    5 pages in length. Money's presence in D. H. Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse Winner" and Flannery O'Connor's "The Lame Shall Enter First" illustrates how people become far too dependent upon its purported ability to ease life's problems. While both stories provide perfect examples of the way in which contemporary culture has turned into a money-dependent society, Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse Winner" badgers the point home with such force that the reader suspects from the very start how significant a role money will play in the characters' ultimate conflict. Similarly, O'Connor's "The Lame Shall Enter First" captures the essence of depravation, as well, when Rufus refuses to accept the valuable telescope Sheppard gives him so that he might become "enlightened." No additional sources cited.

  • Symbolism of the Coyote in The Tortilla Curtain by T.C. Boyle

    This is a 6 page paper discussing the symbolism as portrayed by the coyote as similar to that of the American attitude toward illegal immigrants in the United States. T.C. Boyle’s “The Tortilla Curtain” tells an effective story of illegal immigration in Southern California. While he tells the story of several characters throughout the novel he best depicts the feelings of the characters symbolically by paralleling the story of the immigrants as comparable to the coyotes which continuously intrude into the yards of the residents in the community. By using the coyote symbolism, Boyle best expresses the duality felt by the characters and by American citizens in general in that many feel that the illegal immigrants are intruding upon their “space” in the United States and arriving impoverished and hungry while at the same time everybody understands that the immigrants, and the coyotes, only cross the border in hopes for rewards of a better life because of it. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • National Geography Standards and Jules Verne's Around the World in Eighty Days

    This is an 11 page paper discussing “Around the World in Eighty Days” in regards to the National Geography Standards. When Jules Verne wrote “Around the World in Eighty Days” (1873), the world seemed a much larger place and was just beginning to become more easily circumnavigated in a relatively short time because of the technological advances. Using the National Geography Standards comprised of six essential elements which make up the eighteen standards, it is useful to note that the elements can be identified within Verne’s work. Verne wrote an adventure fantasy story well over a century ago but was able to convey many of the essential elements used in the geographical standards and descriptions still used today. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Emily Mann's The Execution of Justice and Social Injustice

    A 6 page overview of the many injustices which exist within our justice system. Mann’s play is a theatrical recap of the trial of Supervisor Dan White who was ultimately convicted of voluntary manslaughter for the 1978 murder of liberal San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk. Mann reveals the homophobia which underlies the trial and the subsequent sentencing. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Timing and Disguise in 'The Odyssey' Stories

    A 6 page paper which discusses the importance and significance of disguises and timing in three separate Odyssey stories. The stories discussed are “The Odyssey” by Homer, the film “The Odyssey” directed by Andrei Konchalovsky, and the film “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” directed by Joel Coen. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • Poetry, Literature, and Justice and Freedom Themes

    A 5 page paper which examines a common theme in two pieces of literature and two pieces of poetry. The theme discussed is that of freedom and the works are “The Conversion of the Jews” by Philip Roth, “A Room of One’s Own” by Virginia Woolf, “Ego Tripping (There May Be a Reason Why)” by Nikki Giovanni, and “How We Carry Ourselves” by Jimmy Santiago Baca. No additional sources cited.

  • Aspects of Doctor Zhivago

    5 pages in length. Assessing the extent to which the Russian Revolution impacted Pasha Antipov requires one to establish an inherent association between an idealist "whose rage for order overwhelms his moral values" (Doctor Zhivago) and a war that was directly due to the czarist regime collapse from the insurmountable pressure of World War I and a backward economic situation that proved impossible to overcome in the face of Germany's industrialization. Antipov's visionary approach to the social and political world around him was not meant to sustain the weight of revolution; because of the immense internal suffering he endured, he felt life was no longer worth the effort and committed suicide – a painful and final gesture on his part to illustrate just how much he could not tolerate his own failure. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literature and Cultural Stereotypes

    A 6 page paper which examines how three different novels present the reader with different cultural stereotypes. The novels discussed are “Breadgivers” by Anzia Yezierska, “The Awakening” by Kate Chopin, and “Their Eyes were Watching God” by Zora Neale Hurston. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Ancient Writings Like Epic of Gilgamesh and Ideology

    This 6 page paper looks at the Epic of Gilgamesh along with four ancient poems. These are compared and contrasted and similar themes are highlighted. There is a great deal of attention to religion and philosophy. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Classical Literature and Common Theme of Perseverance in Overcoming Obstacles

    A 5 page essay that argues that common themes can be found in the classical literature of the past. The writer explores the theme of perseverance that can be found in Gilgamesh, The Book of Job, The Odyssey and The Aeneid. The writer argues that in each case, the hero perseveres against adversity by overcoming obstacles that stand between him and his goal. He goes on despite those who advice that his quest is foolhardy and eventually is rewarded for his pain by reaching and achieving his goal. No additional sources cited.

  • Canto 3 of 'Inferno' by Dante

    An 8 page research paper that analyzes Canto III from Dante's Inferno (which is a part of his epic masterpiece the Divine Comedy). This examination uses a representative portion of the Inferno, namely Canto III, to illustrate how Dante used the framework of the poem to convey his ideas concerning religion and morality. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Weary Blues' by Langston Hughes

    A 5 page research paper that examines Hughes' poem "The Weary Blues. The writer argues that Hughes attempted to convey an understanding of blues values through his verse to the wider modern world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Ancient Literature and Cultural Characteristics

    A 5 page paper which examines “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” “Oedipus the King,” and “Lysistrata” in terms of the culture of the time and the culture of today. No additional sources cited.

  • Interpreting 'Sailing to Byzantium' by William Butler Yeats

    A 6 page review of one of Yeats’ most spiritually moving poem. The author analyzes the symbolism employed by Yeats to present the contention that Yeats’ intent was to impart a sense of spiritual awareness, of the fragility of life in our worldly form, of the power of the many mystical forces of our universe, and the concepts of reincarnation and life in the afterworld. Bibliography lists 4 sources. PPyeats2.rtf

  • Emily Dickinson and the Poems of Fascicle Twenty-Eight

    A 14 page research paper that examines the poems in fascicle 28, a division that refers to packets of poems that Dickinson grouped together herself. The writer offers a brief explication of each poem, emphasizing thematic content and how the individual poems fit with the overall pattern. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Avi's Don't You Know There is a War On?

    A 3 page review of the book by Avi recounting the experiences and impressions of a fifth grade protagonist (Howie Crispers) during a critical week in March 1943. World War II is raging in Europe and America has pitched herself full fervor into the war effort. From a fifth Grader’s perspective, however, the war has many personal implications as well. Not only must he juggle his failing math grades, a principal whom he believes to be a Nazi spy, and the emotional turmoil surrounding the death of his best friend’s father and the eventual loss of that friend when he moves away, Howie Crispers must learn to deal with his obsession with one of his teachers. The author of this paper unveils this fictional story upon the historical basis of how World War II affected our country on the home front. No additional sources are listed.

  • 'Forgiving My Father' by Lucille Clifton

    A 4 page essay that explicates Lucille Clifton's poem "forgiving my father." The writer argues that this poem concerns the legacy of a childhood made harsh by a father's inability to provide for his family. Clifton, as a woman, identifies most heavily with her mother's anger and disappointment at having married a man who could not provide for his family. However, within the context of this poem, Clifton comes to perceive that her mother's anger is not necessarily her own and that she can forgive them both and, in doing so, move on with her own life. No additional sources cited.

  • Selfishness in O'Connor and Browning

    This 4 page report discusses O'Connor's short story and Browning's "dramatic monologue." In comparing the primary characters of each, the writer makes the assertion that the character of the grandmother is more selfish than Browning's duke. Bibliography lists only the primary sources.

  • Living Like Weasels by Annie Dillard

    A 4 page paper which analyzes Annie Dillard’s “Living Like Weasels.” No additional sources cited.

  • Life and Works of Sylvia Plath

    An introduction to Plath's life and works, including a commentary on three of her poems, Daddy, Lady Lazarus and Morning Song.

  • Life and Works of Sylvia Plath

    An introduction to Plath's life and works, including a commentary on three of her poems, Daddy, Lady Lazarus and Morning Song.

  • Explication of 'London' by Poet William Blake

    A 3 page essay that explicates William Blake's poem London. The writer argues that Blake was frequently critical of English society in his poetry, subtly attacking many of the established institutions and cultural ideas of his era. In his poem "London," Blake paints a portrait of the city that depicts it has having fallen into moral chaos. Appalled at the suffering, poverty, prostitution and mistreatment of children, Blake's poem is scathing social commentary that was intended to open the eyes of the upper classes to the degradation of their society as a whole. London is also briefly compared to Blake's The Chimney Sweeper. No additional sources cited.

  • Fried Green Tomatoes and Relationship Psychology

    A 6 page paper which examines how the characters relate to each other in terms of connections, relational functioning, mutuality, interpersonal dynamics, and motivation. No additional sources are used.

  • Sexuality and Young Women in Sleeping Beauty by Rosario Ferre and Wild Swans by Alice Munro

    A 3 page paper which discusses how young women and their sexuality are seen by society and by the girls in Alice Munro’s “Wild Swans” and Rosario Ferre’s “Sleeping Beauty.” Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • What My Heart Wants to Tell by Verna Mae Slone

    This 3 page report discusses Slone's book about the mountain people of Knott County, Kentucky, where her family has lived since 1790. Her intent was to dispel the myths and half-truths that exist about the people and the area. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Literature of the Medieval Period

    This 21 page paper addresses several different topics. The authors discussed are St. Paul (Romans and Galatians); Augustine (Confessions); Gospel of Mark; Boethius (Consolation); and Gregory of Tours (History of the Franks). The essay discusses: the education of each author; who may have rewritten their original document; defining evil; authors' perceptions of a heavenly kingdom; the authors' use of belief; why each of the authors considered himself a Roman; conflict. While most of the five authors are discussed under each topic heading, not all are. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Sharon Liddell's Children's Book, Being Big

    A 3 page critique of the children’s book “Being Big” by Sharen Liddell. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Move' by Lucille Clifton

    A 4 page explication of Clifton's poem "Move," which was written to commemorate the bombing of Philadelphia Afro-centric movement in Philadelphia in 1985. The writer argues that Clifton's poem is an indictment against the black mayor of Philadelphia at that time for authorizing the attack. No additional sources cited.

  • Women in A Woman by Sibilla Aleramo and The Leopard by Giuseppe Di Lampedusa

    A 4 page acknowledgment of the variation which exist in literature in regard to the presentation of women’s roles. Regardless of the country of origin, literature expresses the author’s liberty to be either sympathetic to women's roles or cynical as to those roles. Their portrayals can be either detailed, shallow, or stereotypical. In most cases literature produced by female authors is more positive in terms of its depiction of women than is literature produced by males. A particularly interesting point of comparison as to how women’s roles are presented in Italian literature exists in Guiseppe Di Lampedusa’s “The Leopard” and Sibilla Aleramo’s “A Woman”. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Literary Analysis of William Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily'

    This 4 page paper discusses the various aspects of Faulkner's short story, A Rose for Emily. Symbolism, character psychology, setting, and quotes included. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Eighteenth Century Literary Satire in the Works of Daniel Defoe and Jonathan Swift

    A 6 page paper which examines the use of satire in literature during the 18th century. The authors examined are Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Eighteenth Century Literature and Religion

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of religion in 18th century literature. The paper examines the work of Jane Austen and John Milton. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Napoleon and Kutuzov in War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

    A paper which considers the different types of statecraft employed by Kutuzov and Napoleon in Tolstoy's War and Peace, and outlines the reasons why the Russian's methods were successful where the French general's were not. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'And Death Shall Have No Dominion' by Dylan Thomas

    An 11 page research paper/essay that analyzes Thomas' poem "And death shall have no dominion." The writer argues that in this poem, it is not religion that Thomas honors, but the idea behind Christian dogma, which is that there is life from death-- an idea, which Thomas argues in his verse is self-evident in nature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Meaning of 'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the meaning behind Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy." The writer points out that throughout the poem, images of men jumble together, some of her father, some of her ex-husband, some that present attempts by Plath to understand her father through his Germanic background. Collectively, along with the intentionally schoolgirl-like rhymes, the poem conveys the black desperation of a lost little girl, which definitely was Plath's psychic state at that time. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Meaning of 'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the meaning behind Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy." The writer points out that throughout the poem, images of men jumble together, some of her father, some of her ex-husband, some that present attempts by Plath to understand her father through his Germanic background. Collectively, along with the intentionally schoolgirl-like rhymes, the poem conveys the black desperation of a lost little girl, which definitely was Plath's psychic state at that time. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Meaning of 'Daddy' by Sylvia Plath

    A 3 page essay that analyzes the meaning behind Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy." The writer points out that throughout the poem, images of men jumble together, some of her father, some of her ex-husband, some that present attempts by Plath to understand her father through his Germanic background. Collectively, along with the intentionally schoolgirl-like rhymes, the poem conveys the black desperation of a lost little girl, which definitely was Plath's psychic state at that time. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Goodbye Tsugumi and N.P. by Banana Yoshimoto

    A 4 page essay that examines the fiction of Japanese writer Banana Yoshimoto, specifically looking at Goodbye Tsugumi, Kitchen and N.P. as being representative of her fictional style. The writer argues that Yoshimoto writes from the heart, offering her readers insight into the minds, as well as the lives of her protagonists. It is this quality in her writing that provides the essential ingredient that gives her novels international appeal. Her books picture young Japanese women trying to cope with the pressures of a traditional culture in a modern world. In portraying their problems and dreams, Yoshimoto creates stories that connect with young people everywhere. No additional sources cited.

  • Literary Portrayals of Lost Innocence

    A 5 page contention that the theme of vanishing youthful innocence is treated by a number of writer. The author of this paper uses the specific works of Voltaire, Henry James, Lewis Carroll, and Alison Habens to support this contention. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Literature of Black America

    An 11 page research paper that begins with brief synopses of four African American novels: Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison; Native Son by Richard Wright; The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man by James W. Johnson; and Cane by Jean Toomer. These synopses are roughly 2 pages each. The remainder of the paper is an essay that compares the endings of Native Son and Song of Solomon. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Story of Doctor Zhivago

    A 4 page paper which examines the story of “Doctor Zhivago” and illustrates how everyone, in some way, can relate to him and his struggles. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature By and About Women

    A 6 page paper which examines what a reader could gain from reading three different pieces of literature written by, and about, women. The books are “Beloved” by Toni Morrison, “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen, and “Ghost Country” by Sara Paretsky. No additional sources cited.

  • Anne Rice's Writings and Sexuality

    A 10 page paper which examines Anne Rice’s use of sexuality in her vampire novels. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Mature Playwrights Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares plays by Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller. The writer argues that while Miller's plays had a broader thematic scope (e.g. The Crucible is applicable to the McCarthy era), Williams' The Glass Menagerie is still a "mature" drama, as it offers insight into human relationships. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Langston Hughes, Maya Angelou, American Identity and Education

    A 5 page paper which examines Maya Angelou’s “Graduation” and Langston Hughes’ “Salvation” as they relate to the importance of education and finding one’s identity. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Exercise in Dante's 'Inferno'

    This 3 page paper provides an example of how to approach a writing exercise that asks one to look at other literature and put characters into the different parts of hell designated by Dante. The literature used is Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Miller's Tale and Othello. No bibliography.

  • Examples of Post-Colonial Strife In Literature

    This 4 page paper examines the following stories in regards to the issue of post-colonial strife: "The Heart of Redness", "Anil's Ghost", and "Sozaboy". Furthermore, this paper illustrates how the characters in these stories are confronted with strife and how they proceed to overcome the strife that occurs in their experience. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • What Defines Americanness in American Literature

    A 4 page essay that discusses works by Chopin, Emerson, Twain, James and Irving in regards to what qualities or characteristics make American literature "American." The writer argues that in the early days of the United States as a free and independent nation, its culture was still largely derivitive of European cultures, particularly that of England. However, throughout the nineteenth century, U.S. writers successfully established a body of literature that was distinctly American, owing little to outside sources and signifying that the US possesses a literary tradition that reflects the experience of a unique people, their history and orientation toward life. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Themes in French Literary Classics

    A 10 page paper which examines themes within French literature. The works discussed are Balzac's “Le Pere Goriot,” Flaubert's “Madame Bovary,” Proust's “Du Cote de Chez Swann,” Gide's “L'Immoralist,” and Camus’ “L'Etranger.” No additional sources cited.

  • Mohsin Hamid's Moth Smoke, Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things and Class

    A 4 page paper which examines the issues of class in “The God of Small Things” by Arundhati Roy and “Moth Smoke” by Mohsin Hamid. No additional sources cited.

  • Sonnet Uses of Hopkins

    A 9 page research paper/essay that analyzes four of Hopkins's poems in relation to how they demonstrate Hopkins' use of the sonnet form. The poems "God's Grandeur," "The Windhover," "As Kingfishers Catch Fire," and "Carrion Comfort" are explicated. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Dracula by Bram Stoker and the Themes of Sexuality and Perversity

    A 4 page paper which examines how Stoker’s use of character doubles, repetition of events, and recurring images help to underscore the theme of boundary crossing and blurring of opposites that allow for moral distinctions, with the emphasis on sexuality/perversity. No additional sources are used.

  • Dracula by Bram Stoker and the Themes of Sexuality and Perversity

    A 4 page paper which examines how Stoker’s use of character doubles, repetition of events, and recurring images help to underscore the theme of boundary crossing and blurring of opposites that allow for moral distinctions, with the emphasis on sexuality/perversity. No additional sources are used.

  • Literature of Canada and Authors Atwood, O'Hagan, and Davies

    A 6 page essay that briefly summarizes three Canadian novels -- Tay John by Howard O'Hagan, fifth Business by Robertson Davies, and Surfacing by Margaret Atwood. The writer offers a brief plot synopsis and analysis of each novel. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and the Creature in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    A 3 page paper which examines the significance of the novels that the Creature reads in Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein.” No additional sources cited.

  • Bette Bao Lord's Spring Moon

    A 7 page paper which reviews and analyzes aspects of Bette Bao Lord’s novel “Spring Moon.” No additional sources cited.

  • Cinematic and Text Versions of Literature A Comparative Analysis

    An 8 page paper which examines the qualities that differentiate text versions from cinematic versions of literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Nietzsche's The Collapse of Western Metaphysics in the Areas of Reason, Morality, and Religion and Underground Man of Fyodor Dostoevsky

    A 5 page contention that we are currently experiencing the retributions of a general crisis in Western Thought, a crisis that has resulted from the collapse of western metaphysics in the areas of reason, morality, and religion. This crisis has serious implications for culture and the image of man alike. The author of this paper illustrates it with an examination of the views of the so-called "underground man" and Nietzsche. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Comparison of the Book and Film Versions of Alcott's Little Women

    This 28 page paper compares Alcott's LIttle women to the film version (1994) of Little Women by Gillian Armstrong. Quotes, citations, examples from various scholarly sources. Contextual support offered from both film and book versions. Bibliography lists 16 sources.

  • Irish Folklore in the Poetry of William Butler Yeats

    A 10 page emphasis that Yeats' work is important not just from an entertainment perspective but also from the perspective that it preserved a critical chapter in Irish history. Many of his poems capture the spirit of Ireland, the richness of the folklore and the old wives tales as well as the soul of the quest for Irish independence. The author of the paper uses "Come Gather Round Me, Parnellites" and "Sailing to Byzantium" to illustrate this point. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Piety, the Bible, Sophocles, and Plato

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares Plato's Euthyphro, Sophocles' Oedipus and the Book of Genesis, chapter 22. The writer points out that all of these works concern the perspective of ancient peoples on issues of piety, justice and the manner in which these issues intersect with religion. Examination of these texts shows that Sophocles and the author of Genesis agree that divine authority demands and deserves unquestioning obedience. However, Plato, in representing the philosophy of Socrates, presents a more ambiguous picture that emphasizes the unreliability of a purely religious foundation for issues of justice. Analysis of these positions shows that Plato's stance in Euthyphro is the most logical-- and just-- by modern standards. No additional sources cited.

  • Browning's Last Duchess & Her Fatal Misstep

    A 3 page essay that discusses Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess" and how this applies to the concept of "hamarita." The literary term "hamarita" has been defined simply as a "tragic flaw," however, it does not necessarily refer to flaw in character, as it can also be an "unwitting, even a necessary, misstep in doing rather than an error in character" (Literary Vocabulary). In Robert Browning's poem "My Last Duchess," it is made clear that the duke's last duchess did, indeed, take a fatal misstep that brought about her demise and that action consisted, not in a character defect, but in the fact that she was too good, too caring, too human, to be a proper aristocrat in the eyes of her husband. Her hamarita lay in her love of life and individuality, which prevented her from existing solely as just one more beautiful possession belong to the duke. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Doyle & Gaskell/Victorian Literature

    A 10 page paper that consists of two 5-page papers. The first discusses Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Bakervilles in terms of he used the concept of mystery. The writer asserts that Doyle's creation of Holmes ushered in this genre into popular consciousness. Its bibliography lists 2 sources. The second 5-page paper is on Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton and the concept of industrialization, which the writer relates to class bias and the Victorian ideas on cleanliness. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Development of Literature: Medieval to Victorian

    A 3 page paper which examines the development of literature from Medieval times to the Victorian Age. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Analysis: "The Tell Tale Heart"

    This 4 page paper examines Edgar Allan Poe's classic story "The Tell Tale Heart." It argues that the narrator is in the grip of obsession that leads him to kill. It also argues that the same can be said of Willard in the film "Apocalypse Now." Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Beauty, Competitiveness and Death in Snow White

    This 7 page analysis of Snow White suggests that beauty and age enter into the picture and explain the Queen's behavior. Beauty in society is evaluted. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • American Ethnic Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines what American Ethnic Literature should do. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • New Orleans Literature: Race, Class and Gender

    A 5 page paper which examines the perspectives of race, class and gender in New Orleans literature. The paper examines the work of Walker Percy, Louis Armstrong, and Ellen Gilchrist. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Gatsby & the American Dream

    A 3 page essay that discusses F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, which can be viewed as an exploration of the psychological ramifications of the American Dream. Examination of Fitzgerald’s masterpiece indicates the reasons for the enduring relevance of this book as it accurately and insightfully portrays the contradictions that characterize the American Dream and how this can influence individual lives. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Christianity in Beowulf

    A 6 page research paper/essay that discusses Christian symbols in the epic poem Beowulf. This poem has its origins in pagan culture, but it was recorded by a Christian scribe (Saupe 97). Therefore there are “overlays” that color the narrative with Christian religious meaning (Saupe 97). This examination of the Christian overlay of meaning in Beowulf attempts to discern if this Christian influence changes in the descriptions of Beowulf’s three quests, or remains uniform throughout. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Psychology of Characters in The Iliad

    A 7 page paper which examines the psychology of the characters in Homer’s The Iliad. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Themes: To Kill a Mockingbird

    A 3 page paper which examines various themes in Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. No additional sources cited.

  • Medieval Law and Literature

    This 5 page paper examines several medieval laws and argues that they resemble literature, not legal documents. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Medieval Law and Literature in ‘Beowulf’

    In ten pages this paper examines how Medieval law manifests itself in the anonymously written epic ‘Beowulf’ with the focuses being the patriarchy, legal and moral duty established through patrilineal custom, the complex matter of inheritance, and the transition from Germanic customs and community obligation to Anglo law and order. One source is cited in the bibliography.

  • Management/Labor Conflict in "The Grapes of Wrath"

    This 3 page paper argues that Steinbeck's purpose in writing "The Grapes of Wrath" was to illustrate the way in which management exploits labor, and he did it by creating a protagonist (Tom Joad) who changed from a disinterested person to a man committed to organizing labor. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • "Death of a Salesman" as an Analogy for the Death of the American Dream

    This 5 page paper discusses the way in which Arthur Miller's play "Death of a Salesman" can be seen as analogous to the death of the American dream. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Female Influence on British Literature

    A 7 page discussion of several of the female British authors that have influenced literature and society. This paper includes Mary Shelly, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Agatha Christie, Virginia Woolf, Jane Austen, Margery Allingham, and Elizabeth Gaskell. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Eliot and Hardy and the Victorian Age

    This 6 page paper discusses "Jude the Obscure" by Thomas Hardy and "Middlemarch" by George Eliot; it also discusses Matthew Arnold's idea of a balance between anarchy and culture. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Symbolism in "The Great Gatsby"

    This 10 page paper discusses Fitzgerald's use of color symbolism in his classic novel "The Great Gatsby." Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Satire and Irony in Political Literature

    This 3 page paper examines Past and Present, The Communist Manifesto and Erewhon. Some quotes are included. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Pariarchy and the Repression of Women: Reflections in Literature

    A 6 page review of some of the writings of Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Carolyn Kizer. Included are Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour” and “The Awakening”, Gilman’s “Yellow Wallpaper” and "Women and Economics: A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution", and Kizer’s “The Bitch”. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Lois W. Johnson/Trouble at Wild River

    A 3 page book review of a juvenile novel. Trouble at Wild River by Lois W. Johnson is a thrilling, suspense novel geared toward pre-teen readers. The suspenseful narrative propels the novel, as the young people, Kate and Anders, endeavor to discover who has been changing the ownership markings on the logs that farmers will be sending down river. However, the novel has a broader appeal than that of a simply mystery, as it addresses how Kate is adapting to her new family. Her mother has recently married Anders’s father. Also there are familial issues with her mother’s brother Ben. As this suggests, the volatile emotions of a pre-teen girl are addressed within the framework offered by the mystery. No additional sources cited.

  • Japanese Literature: "Essays in Idleness" and "An Account of My Hut"

    This 8 page paper compares two Japanese works of Medieval literature, "Essays in Idleness" and "An Account of My Hut." Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Japanese Literature: "Essays in Idleness" and "An Account of My Hut"

    This 8 page paper compares two Japanese works of Medieval literature, "Essays in Idleness" and "An Account of My Hut." Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Langston Hughes/Critical Response to 2 Poems

    A 9 page research paper that discusses 2 poems by Langston Hughes (1902-1967), who has been termed the “Shakespeare of Harlem,” as he is credited with some of the finest poetry to emerge from that “great flowering of African-American literature known as the Harlem Renaissance” (Sundquist 55). Two of his poems, “Harlem,” which is also known under the title “Dream Deferred,” and “I, Too, Sing America” exemplify the radical protest spirit that characterizes a great deal of Hughes’ verse. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Langston Hughes/Critical Response to 2 Poems

    A 9 page research paper that discusses 2 poems by Langston Hughes (1902-1967), who has been termed the “Shakespeare of Harlem,” as he is credited with some of the finest poetry to emerge from that “great flowering of African-American literature known as the Harlem Renaissance” (Sundquist 55). Two of his poems, “Harlem,” which is also known under the title “Dream Deferred,” and “I, Too, Sing America” exemplify the radical protest spirit that characterizes a great deal of Hughes’ verse. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart

    A 5 page tutorial analysis of Edgar Allen Poe’s short story The Tell-Tale Heart. No additional sources cited.

  • Hamlet & Oedipus

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares the characters of Hamlet and Oedipus. Despite being separated by the passage of centuries, as well as differences in language and culture, Sophocles’ portrayal of Oedipus and Shakespeare’s depiction of Hamlet bear similarities, as well as the innumerable differences that one would expect. The similarities revolve around themes common to both plays, such as incest and the use of symbolism, while the differences largely involve the specifics of characterization. No additional sources cited.

  • Jane Eyre's Relationship with Rochester: Freud's Unconscious

    14 pages in length. Bronte's Jane Eyre is replete with Freudian undertones where Jane and Rochester's relationship is concerned, most notably where the imbalance of rank is concerned. The master/slave, father/daughter composition of their union is both grand and far-reaching; that Rochester assumes the decidedly superior and patriarchal role over the subservient status Jane feels compelled to adopt speaks clearly to Freud's psychoanalytic composition of unconscious, repression and the Oedipal complex. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Flaubert/Emma Bovary

    A 4 page essay that discusses the causes for Emma Bovary’s unhappy life and eventually suicide. These causes include Emma’s convent education and her passion for Romance novels, which is a habit she continued into adulthood. Also in childhood, the death of her mother and the occupation of her father influenced her environment, as did the double standards of the nineteenth century in regards to the social opportunities and expectations of women and men. No additional sources cited.

  • The Bible, Koran, And Divine Comedy

    A 5 page paper. Each work is discussed separately in terms of their contribution to modern society. The influence and impact of the Bible itself can be found across life from culture to law to literature and so on. The contribution of the Koran itself is more difficult to determine although many individual Muslims contributed significantly to areas like medicine, math and architecture. Dante's Divine Comedy greatly influenced several different areas of life. The writer comments on which book contributed the most and why. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Hendel: "Apples in Honey"

    This 3 page paper discusses the short story "Apples in Honey" by Israeli writer Yehudit Hendel. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The Christian Influence in Medieval Literature

    This 4 page paper discusses the influence of Christianity on medieval literature by exploring "Beowulf," "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" and Dante. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • O. Henry/Gift of the Magi

    A 5 page essay that discusses the career of William Sydney Porter, who is better known by his pseudonym of “O. Henry,” a man who is one of America’s most prolific writers of the short story genre (O. Henry, Writer). Over the course of his career, O. Henry wrote roughly 600 short stories, which were published in 14 volumes (William Sydney Porter). A master of suspense, O. Henry portrayed the lives of ordinary people, but would typically use a plot twist that gave his stories a characteristic sense of irony (O. Henry). It is O. Henry’s trademark sense of irony that gives one of his best known stories, “The Gift of the Magi,” its grace and meaning. The paper focuses on discusses this story. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Symbolism in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"

    This 4 page paper discusses the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," and argues that it can be seen as a struggle between paganism and Christianity, with the symbols of the green sash and the pentacle on Gawain's shield representing each of these theologies respectively. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Dante’s Inferno/Canto XX

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Canto XX from Dante Alighieri’s epic poem “The Divine Comedy,” which begins with the book entitled “Inferno” and records how Dante journeys through Hell led by the specter of the ancient Roman poet Virgil. In Canto XX, Dante, the poet as opposed to the character in the poem, reasons that piety lives but that pity is dead. This may seem hard-hearted to the modern-day reader, but it fits with the theological reasoning of Dante’s era, which believed that God’s justice should be accepted unequivocally and with complete faith, that is, with piety. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Study Guide/Oedipus the King & Darker Face of the Earth

    A 5 page research paper that offers a study guide and suggestions on how to understand and approach the task of essay writing on 2 plays: Oedipus the King by Sophocles and The Darker Face of the Earth by Rita Dove. To repeat this, this paper is not an essay but it rather suggestions and a study guide. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Franklin’s Tale: Courtly Love and Marriage

    A 3 page paper which examines how Chaucer’s Franklin’s Tale demonstrates and incompatibility between courtly love and marriage. No additional sources cited.

  • Dante’s Inferno & Humanism

    A 3 page essay that discusses “The Inferno” from Dante’s medieval epic poem The Divine Comedy. This poem describes the experience of the author, led by the specter of the ancient Roman poet Virgil, through a journey of spiritual enlightenment that takes him through Hell, Purgatory and finally to Heaven. The punishments that are inflicted on the souls in Hell strike Dante, as a character in the poem, as inhumane, but Dante, the poet, makes it clear that each punishment is ideally suited as retribution for the sins committed by these souls while the individuals were alive on earth. Therefore, as the poem’s narrator moves through Hell, he receives progressive lessons pertaining to what it means to be fully human and fully in accord with the expectations of God. No additional sources cited.

  • Dante’s Inferno & Humanism

    A 3 page essay that discusses “The Inferno” from Dante’s medieval epic poem The Divine Comedy. This poem describes the experience of the author, led by the specter of the ancient Roman poet Virgil, through a journey of spiritual enlightenment that takes him through Hell, Purgatory and finally to Heaven. The punishments that are inflicted on the souls in Hell strike Dante, as a character in the poem, as inhumane, but Dante, the poet, makes it clear that each punishment is ideally suited as retribution for the sins committed by these souls while the individuals were alive on earth. Therefore, as the poem’s narrator moves through Hell, he receives progressive lessons pertaining to what it means to be fully human and fully in accord with the expectations of God. No additional sources cited.

  • Wordsworth & Hardy/Perspectives on Nature

    A 3 page essay that observes that both William Wordsworth, in 1838, and Thomas Hardy, in 1900, wrote poems that were inspired by the beautiful song of the thrush. But while these two poems share a common topic, the Romantic approach and exuberant optimism of Wordsworth is quite different from the dark skepticism that characterized the Victorian worldview exemplified by Hardy. Nevertheless, examination of the two poems shows that each poet took inspiration and encouragement from the thrush, each in his own way. No additional sources cited.

  • Wordsworth & Hardy/Perspectives on Nature

    A 3 page essay that observes that both William Wordsworth, in 1838, and Thomas Hardy, in 1900, wrote poems that were inspired by the beautiful song of the thrush. But while these two poems share a common topic, the Romantic approach and exuberant optimism of Wordsworth is quite different from the dark skepticism that characterized the Victorian worldview exemplified by Hardy. Nevertheless, examination of the two poems shows that each poet took inspiration and encouragement from the thrush, each in his own way. No additional sources cited.

  • Wordsworth & Hardy/Perspectives on Nature

    A 3 page essay that observes that both William Wordsworth, in 1838, and Thomas Hardy, in 1900, wrote poems that were inspired by the beautiful song of the thrush. But while these two poems share a common topic, the Romantic approach and exuberant optimism of Wordsworth is quite different from the dark skepticism that characterized the Victorian worldview exemplified by Hardy. Nevertheless, examination of the two poems shows that each poet took inspiration and encouragement from the thrush, each in his own way. No additional sources cited.

  • Homsexuality in Capote’s Other Voices, Other Rooms

    A 3 page paper which examines whether or not the protagonist in Truman Capote’s novel Other Voices, Other Rooms was a blossoming homosexual. Bibliography lists 1 additional source.

  • Amy Tan’s Two Kinds: Mothers and Daughters

    A 4 page paper which examines mother/daughter relationships as seen through Amy Tan’s short story Two Kinds. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Analysis: “The Sun Also Rises”

    This 6 page paper analyzes the themes of gender and sports in Hemingway’s novel “The Sun Also Rises.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Myth and its Function

    This 7 page paper discusses the role of myth within a good story: Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean M. Aurel. The importance of archetypal image is discussed, as well as the perception that writing is the key to human consciousness as shown in Walter Ong's Orality and Literacy: The Technologicalizing of the Word. Bibliographylists 4 sources.

  • Pessimism and Optimism in Candide by Voltaire

    5 pages in length. Voltaire's 'Candide' helps one to make a solid distinction between the concepts of rosy optimism and gloomy pessimism. By doing so, this particular literary masterpiece provides insight as to what constitute the notion of happiness and the existence of despair. The writer discusses how Voltaire effectively demonstrates these points by way of Pangloss and Martin, each of whom represent the opposite ends of the spectrum. No additional sources cited.

  • Symbolism in I Saw the Sky Catch Fire by T. Obinkaram Echewa

    5 pages in length. T. Obinkaram Echewa is a man whose writings dig deep to reveal the truth of the human heart. His classic works reflect a writer concerned with the darker, more disturbing aspect of humanity, while at the same time they also represent the benevolent side of womankind. The writer discusses that throughout his works, Echewa utilizes an extensive array of symbolism, which is particularly evident in "I Saw The Sky Catch Fire." No additional sources used.

  • Seamus Heaney's Poetry and Ghosts of the Earth

    A fifteen page paper looking at this Irish poet's views of the thin veil between life and death, as depicted in his works. The paper asserts that Heaney views the dead and the living, the past and the present, as occupying the same space. Bibliography lists fifteen sources, including seven poems of Heaney's.

  • Literature and Free Will

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Stephen Crane's 'The Open Boat' with Jack London's 'To Build a Fire.' The concept of free will is explored in respect to the characters in these works. The short stories are compared and contrasted. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Free Will

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Stephen Crane's 'The Open Boat' with Jack London's 'To Build a Fire.' The concept of free will is explored in respect to the characters in these works. The short stories are compared and contrasted. No additional sources cited.

  • Jean Craighead George's Julie of the Wolves

    This 5 page paper contemplates this fictitious work by Jean Craighead George. The protagonist is discussed in terms of motivation and inner development. Much of the discussion concerns coming of age in different cultures. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Sense of Place in Swamp Angel by Ethel Wilson

    In 5 pages, the author discusses the way in which sense of place was developed in "Swamp Angel" by Ethel Wilson. No other sources are cited.

  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien and the Theme of Heroism

    A 7 page research paper that examines the topic of heroism in J.R.R. Tolkein's 'The Hobbit.' The writer argues that while the overall pattern for this narrative fits with the typical mythical depiction of an heroic epic, Tolkien departs from this template in many important respects. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Good and Evil in Sula by Toni Morrison

    A 5 page research paper that examines the characters of 'Sula' and 'Nel' as representations of 'good' and 'evil' in this work by Toni Morrison. Sula and her friend Nel, form the focal point for this narrative and it is around this duo that other relationships revolve. Sula comes to represent evil and social alienation. Nel, on the other hand, becomes a perfect example of social propriety. However, the writer argues that Morrison's point is that Sula and Nel's relationship demonstrates the very Eastern idea that good and evil are but two sides of the same coin. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Women's Self Determination in The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A five page paper showing how this nineteenth-century feminist author structured her novel in order to explicate her theme of the importance of a woman's self-determination. The paper asserts that far from being a "shock" ending, the protagonist's suicide is the predictable result of her inability to achieve her potential. Bibliography lists seven sources.

  • Being There by Kosinski

    This 5 page paper provides a first person analysis of the protagonist. The book is discussed in terms of Chance's relationship with plants and television as well as other things. No additional sources cited.

  • Marriage in 'The Way Of The World' by William Congreve

    5 pages in length. William Congreve's "The Way Of The World" addresses the issue of marriage in a number of different ways. While play speaks about the bonds of matrimony in one way or another, it is not actually the marriage, in and of itself, upon which the tale focuses. Rather, the author carefully yet quite effectively touches upon marriage, its meaning within the social backdrop, as well as the requirements necessary to maintain its existence; however, this tale delves much deeper into the aspect of marriage than what merely resides upon the surface. It is through intense character examination in Act IV, Scene V that the reader is able to see beyond the marital façade to a more realistic place where the Congreve's protagonist inevitably dwells. No additional sources cited.

  • Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs

    Harriet Jacobs wrote the story of her life of enslavement, mistreatment, confinement and eventual freedom shortly after the end of the Civil War. This 5 page paper argues that Incidents in the Life of A Slave Girl was intended to be read as a slave narrative and, as such to provide a historical documentation of what the reality of slavery entailed - at least for a young woman. It is also a political manifesto in that it argues that the realities of slavery were not much different from the Northern social norms of segregation. No additional sources are listed.

  • Our Secret by Susan Griffin

    5 pages in length. The writer discusses Susan Griffin's "Our Secret" as it relates to true spirituality and human connectedness. No additional sources cited.

  • What Invisibility Means in Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

    A six page paper looking at Ralph Ellison's novel in terms of the way certain classes of people are rendered invisible by a society that refuses to see them as individuals. The paper observes that by the end of the novel, the protagonist has moved from a socially-imposed invisibility that makes him personally inauthentic to a self-imposed invisibility where he can be truly himself. Bibliography lists ten sources.

  • Slavery as Presented in Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    In 5 pages, the author discusses Harriett Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin or Life Among the Lowly. 'When considering the institution of slavery in America, one must look to one specific text in order to understand what happened during that horrific time in America's past. That work is Uncle Tom's Cabin or Life Among the Lowly, which exemplifies the injustices faced by the Black American in the 1800s. This book was written by Harriett Beecher Stowe and published in 1852. From this tome, one is able to examine how the institution of slavery and a condoning society conspired to destroy the souls of the enslaved Black Americans. As an author, Stowe appears to want the reader to comprehend those realities so that he/she can better understand how to become a human being instead of a virtual animal. Her thesis appears to be that slavery equals destruction, evil, and lack of humanity. Slavery has negative ethical, moral, and religious implications.' No other sources are cited.

  • Lingering Power of The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

    A 10 page paper that explores the figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and irony contained in Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie". Also discussed are the underlying themes of the story. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Envy by Soviet Novelist Yuri Olesha

    A five page paper on this novel by Soviet novelist Yuri Olesha. The paper compares two of the characters, Babichev and Kavalerov, in terms of their political views and their significance to the human condition. Bibliography lists two sources.

  • Literature and the Influence of Sir Isaac Newton

    8 pages in length. Newton's influence upon the literary world maintains its foundation within the concepts of truth and reality. Instrumental in inspiring writers from all walks of life, Newtonian concepts have become an integral component for those writers who strive to incorporate a deeper, more meaningful existence to their literary experiences. The writer discusses that when one attempts to assess Newtonian influence upon literature, evidence can be found in virtually every genre. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature and the Influence of Sir Isaac Newton

    8 pages in length. Newton's influence upon the literary world maintains its foundation within the concepts of truth and reality. Instrumental in inspiring writers from all walks of life, Newtonian concepts have become an integral component for those writers who strive to incorporate a deeper, more meaningful existence to their literary experiences. The writer discusses that when one attempts to assess Newtonian influence upon literature, evidence can be found in virtually every genre. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Theme of Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

    5 pages in length. The writer discusses that apart from the obvious thematic ploys of Emily Bronte's "Wuthering Heights," there exists an overriding theme of Catherine's betrayal of her true self. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Love of Family and Homeland in Euripides' Medea

    5 pages in length. The relationship between love of homeland and love of family in "Medea" becomes as conflicting as does the relationship between the primary characters. However, this struggle to choose between person and place is not limited to just these two characters, but rather is apparent with nearly all of the characters who have speaking parts. Indicative of the play's inherent quest for balance between both entities, the writer discusses how it becomes clear that there is not room to accommodate one with the other, which forces the characters to sometimes make difficult decisions. No additional sources cited.

  • Character Analysis of Nwoye in Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

    A 3 page paper which discusses the strengths and weaknesses of Nwoye in 'Things Fall Apart' by Chinua Achebe. This character's strengths lie in his ability to look beyond the traditional and accepted. He looks outside of that tradition to see another faith. But, herein also lies some of his weakness for he is, in many ways, running from what frightens him about his own culture. No additional sources cited.

  • Bigger Thomas in 'Native Son' by Richard Wright

    A 6 page paper which examines two opposing critical interpretations of the protagonist Bigger Thomas in Richard Wright's novel, "Native Son," to determine whether or not Bigger is a positive or negative African-American character. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Historical and Social Perspectives of Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

    5 pages in length. The social and historical aspect in Joseph Conrad’s "Heart of Darkness" are such that they are significantly more subtle than it is obvious. There exist both implied and obscure representation within Conrad's text, as well as those that possess a more literal image and conceptualization. The writer discusses that Conrad’s implication of social and historical impact within a traditional, even romantic setting leaves one to ascertain that the author possessed a great sense of the future within his writings. No additional sources cited.

  • The Stronger by August Strindberg

    This 5 page paper explores themes of this unique play and answers the question 'Who is the Stronger?' Themes discussed include marital power, gender and sex. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Classical Greek Literature and Women's Tragic Marriages

    A 4 page paper that examines the recurrent theme of woman's tragic condition, especially in the matter of marriage, as presented in the Greek tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Works discussed are Agamemnon, Tereus, and Medea. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Stronger by August Strindberg

    This 5 page report discusses who is the stronger character in Strindberg’s play “The Stronger.” “The Stronger” is a three-character one-act in which the central character never appears, and one of the two female rivals for his love says nothing. The entire action of the play takes place over only a 15-minute period. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Imperialism and Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

    A 4 page paper that examines the manner in which African author Chinua Achebe challenges traditional ideas of imperialism in his novel entitled Things Fall Apart. A short synopsis of the novel's plot is included, with particular emphasis placed on the sections in which Achebe emphasizes the uneven trade of time honored tradition for Western cultural imperialism. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • 'Low Lifes' in Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

    A 7 page paper that examines Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic 1852 novel Uncle Tom's Cabin. An analysis of the characters of Arthur Shelby, Mr. Haley, and Simon Legree is presented as well as the underlying theme that entwines these characters. Also included is an excerpt from Eliza's flight and its relation to the general theme as well as a short analysis of positive early twentieth century critiques. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Amerian Society and Economy as Presented in John Ford's Stagecoach and Ann Banks' First Person America

    5 pages in length. Ann Banks' "First Person America" and John Ford's "Stagecoach" individually represent a changing class-consciousness related to modifying economic and social conditions of the 1930s. Indeed, it can readily be argued that imaginative texts do not directly document such experiences of the 1930s, but rather they indirectly represent conflicts, tensions, changing values and the ever shifting conditions of the particular setting. No additional sources cited.

  • Characters and Plot from Miller, O'Connor and Plath

    A 6 page paper which compares and contrasts Arthur Miller's play, "Death of a Salesman," Frank O'Connor's short story, "First Communion," and Sylvia Plath's poem, "Metaphors" in terms of characters, tone, plot and style to reveal how each author appeals to the senses, emotions and intellect of the readers.

  • Frank Serpico and Willie Stark

    This 5 page paper compares the real life Frank Serpico and the fictional Willie Stark who appears in All the King's Men. Corruption is the theme as they are compared and contrasted to one another. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Frank Serpico and Willie Stark

    This 5 page paper compares the real life Frank Serpico and the fictional Willie Stark who appears in All the King's Men. Corruption is the theme as they are compared and contrasted to one another. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Heathcliff's Emotional and Physical Abuse in Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

    5 pages in length. The writer discusses the underlying theme of Heathcliff's physical and emotional abuse. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

    6 pages in length. Who is Heathcliff in Emily Bronte's 'Wuthering Heights,' and what is his role within the story's context? Indeed, Heathcliff is destined to become a brooding, troubled and angry man who has lost control of his own life due in large part to the abusive treatment he receives as a child. The writer discusses that the most interesting aspect of Heathcliff's character is the manner by which he perpetually transfers his deep-seated anger and frustration upon all who enter his life, even to the point of emotionally poisoning his own offspring. No additional sources cited.

  • Homosexuality in the Works of Oscar Wilde

    7 pages in length. Did Oscar Wilde's homosexual tendencies provide the author with a hidden theme throughout his works? Some have argued that the author's anxieties with regard to his own homosexuality represents a subtle but obvious enough underlying theme. Although the characters in Oscar Wilde's stories are all in heterosexual relationships, critics contend that there exists an undercurrent of homosexual desire between and among the main characters. They cite that in many of his works, exposure of a secret sin or indiscretion and consequent disgrace is central in design, clearly symbolizing the author's penchant toward homosexuality throughout his literary creations. The writer discusses how one only needs to peruse the myriad pages of Wilde's works in order to ascertain the truth: there is no homosexual reference, hidden or otherwise. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Alienation in The French Lieutenant's Woman by John Fowles

    5 pages in length. Alienation can accurately be described as an inclination of temperament or outlook. Another way to describe it would be to call it a highly personal and unreasoned distortion of judgment. More often than not, alienation is defined as a negative outlook. In the case of John Fowles' "The French Lieutenant's Woman," alienation is what the author's protagonist -- Sarah – comes to loathe. While she is an upstanding and compassionate woman, she is unfairly thrust into the lair of societal judgment when she is falsely accused of being a whore. The writer discuss how this erroneous conclusion not only causes her unmerited emotional distress but it also casts an even larger shadow of doubt as to whether or not her French sailor will ever return for her. No additional sources cited.

  • Emily Dickinson and the Poems of Fascicle Twenty-Eight

    A 14 page research paper that examines the poems in fascicle 28, a division that refers to packets of poems that Dickinson grouped together herself. The writer offers a brief explication of each poem, emphasizing thematic content and how the individual poems fit with the overall pattern. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Wood Pile' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page explication of Robert Frost's poem "The Wood-Pile." The writer summarizes the poem, and then examines it closely, line by line, as to Frost's use of poetic devices, as well as the poem's thematic meaning. No additional sources cited.

  • Poetic Analysis of 'The Wood Pile' by Robert Frost

    A 5 page explication of Robert Frost's poem "The Wood-Pile." The writer summarizes the poem, and then examines it closely, line by line, as to Frost's use of poetic devices, as well as the poem's thematic meaning. No additional sources cited.

  • Love and Marriage Disappointments

    A 5 page paper which examines “A Story of an Hour” by , “A Doll’s House” by Ibsen, and three poems as they present the reader with a look at the disappointments often found in love and marriage. The poems discussed are “Aunt Jennifer’s Tiger” and “Moving in Winter” by Adrienne Rich and “Ex-Husband” by Gabriel Spera. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Children and Young Adult Literature with an Annotated Bibliography

    This 11 page paper provides an annotated bibliography on a variety of books in many genres. Classic works are discussed as well as contemporary realistic literature, poetry and fantasy. Annotated bibliography lists 30 sources.

  • Sharon Kay Penman When Christ and His Saints Slept

    This is a 5 page book review of Sharon Kay Penman’s novel “When Christ and His Saints Slept”. Sharon Kay Penman’s novel “When Christ and His Saints Slept” (1995) tells the story of the struggle for the English crown upon the death of Henry I during the 12th century. The novel is considered excellent on many accounts by the critics. Firstly, the novel is accurate in its detail in revealing the political turmoil and its horrific effects on the citizens of Britain at the time. Secondly, by the in-depth characterizations used in the novel and in some cases the introduction of fictional characters in order to obtain this, Penman managed to find a way to humanize that era in history which had previously been untold in such a manner. By doing this Penman not only creates an intensely interesting novel of history but also hopes to inspire her readers to further their education in the history of the Middle Ages, an area she considers still dark and undiscovered in its previous depictions. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Author Stephen Crane and the Naturalist Literary Genre

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the naturalism genre in literature and writer Stephen Crane. American writer Stephen Crane (1871-1900) was well known for his naturalist style during his time. Naturalism in literature was a philosophy used by writers to describe humans in regards to the influences and interactions within their own environments. The characters described in naturalist literature were usually in dire surroundings and often from the middle to lower classes. Despite their circumstances however, humans within naturalist literature were able to eventually overcome their situations by some form of courage or heroism which Crane found to be consistent in all of the cultures and setting he studied. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Women as Viewed by Charles Dickens and Jane Austen

    A 5 page paper which examines how Jane Austen’s views women in “Emma” and Charles Dickens views women in “David Copperfield.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Relationships Between Men and Women in Literature and Throughout History

    An 8 page research paper that examines how historical sources and literature have portrayed male/female relationships. The writer specifically examines this topic in regards to marriage in the nineteenth century. Literary sources discussed are A Doll's House, The Awakening and Jane Eyre. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Seventeenth Century 'Old English' Literature

    A 20 pages research paper that answers questions on English literature from Beowulf to Gulliver's Travels. Works discussed include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Utopia, the Metaphysical Poets, and King Lear. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'The Odyssey' by Homer Content Analysis

    A 5 page paper which examines the Robert Fagles’ translation of the classic Greek poem to consider why Odysseus did not immediately return to Ithaca, the reasons behind his lengthy hiatus, contemplates what he is searching for and determines whether or not the text can be read as a metaphor for the Ionian exile. No additional sources are used.

  • Women's and Men's Roles in American Literature

    A 5 page paper which examines the roles that men and women played in the literature of Colonial America and the New Republic. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • D.H. Lawrence's 'Horse Dealer's Daughter' and the Character of Mabel

    A 5 page paper which examines the character of Mabel in “Horse Dealer’s Daughter.” The paper focuses on three elements of her character which help to define the character’s role. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • Relationship Between Truth and History

    This 5 page paper examines two works of fiction: Coetzee's Disgrace and Churchill's Cloud Nine, and determines how fictional narrative works in relation do describing history and writing about truth. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Postcolonial Literature and Displacement

    A six page paper which considers the concepts of sense of place and displacement in postcolonial literature, especally with reference to hybridisation and the reification of indigenous culture. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • The Red and the Black by Stendhal and the Characters Mathilde and Julien

    A five page paper which looks at the relationship between Julien and Mathilde in Stendhal's novel, particularly with regard to the concepts of honesty and hypocrisy as evinced by both their association and the author's portrayal of French society as a whole. Bibliography lists 1 source

  • Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

    This 5 page paper provides an overview of the book but critically evaluates it in respect to characterization and the thematic element of race. The mother is the focus of this analysis which sees her as important in shaping her son's life. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Captivity of Women in A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson and The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper

    This is a 6 page paper on a comparison of Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” and Rowlandson’s “A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson” in regards to strength, sexuality and purity. James Fenimore Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” and Mary Rowlandson’s “A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson” both tell stories of female captives during the Indian colonial wars in the Eastern U.S. In Cooper’s work of fiction, he tells the story of Cora Munro and how she provides the strength needed to allow her pure sister to survive their captivity. Cora is of mixed blood but still finds the idea of marrying Magua the Huron “morally repugnant”. Cooper was also criticized after the publication of the work in his insinuation of doubting the purity of the colonists. Rowlandson’s true account of her own captivity stressed that she found her strength to survive her ordeal through the purity of the Psalms of the Puritan religion. Rowlandson’s strength came from her religion whereas Cora’s came from within herself and her use of her powerful sexuality: the colonist ideals remain intact however as Rowlandson survived and the impure Cora dies. These ideals of the importance of pure blood lines are still seen today in the rapes which are reported during wartime in Joanne Barkan’s article on the Serbian rape camps of Yugoslavia which were meant to bring impurity to the blood lines of the Muslims. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • French Romantic Literary Works and Their Similarities

    A 5 page paper which discusses the similarities in the novels “Madame Bovary,” “Pere Goriot,” and “Cheri” as the literature of the French Romanticism period. Bibliography lists 3 additional sources.

  • Stephen Crane's Maggie A Girl of the Streets and Women's Opportunities

    A 5 page paper which examines the position of Maggie in Stephen Crane’s “Maggie: A Girl of the Streets” in relationship to opportunities available for women at the turn of the century. The paper argues that while there were opportunities in some parts of the country, Maggie’s environment and position in society were such that there were no options for her. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparision of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure and Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. While each novel features an independently minded female protagonist, the writer argues that there are distinct differences between them as well, specifically focusing on the topic of marriage and sexuality. No additional sources cited.

  • Characters in 'The Cook,' 'The Shipman,' 'The Doctor' and 'The Guildsmen' in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales

    This 5 page paper looks at the characters of the guildsmen, the Cook, the shipman and the doctor in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and how they are portrayed as negative characters. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • A Discussion of Christian Elements in the Epic Poem Beowulf, and in the Character of Beowulf Himself

    This is a 10 page paper discussing Beowulf as a Christian and Christian elements in the poem “Beowulf”. Beowulf, written by an unknown author in 8th century England, tells the tale of a young hero, Beowulf as he defeats evil monsters in order to defend his people. He arrives in the story as one who is already well known for his victories over monsters and in addition, he is virtuous and good and benefits his victories in battle to the grace of God. He relates tales of how God calmed the seas in order for him to be able to see the sea monsters and slay them. When he is fighting the evil Grendel, a descendent from Cain, and Grendel’s mother, he asks that God give victory to the one He believes is the most good and believes that his victories would not have been successful without God’s assistance. Many pagan elements appear in the poem, such as monsters, which no doubt reflects the overall situation and conflict between the pagan and Christian religions which existed in England at that time. The heavy Christian influence in the poem however, is reflected in the Christian Beowulf overcoming the powerful pagan monsters. Overall, Beowulf the hero, and Beowulf the poem can both be considered Christian in their faith, symbolism and the elements of strength seen as rewards for Christian goodness and virtue. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Social Transgressions in D.H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers

    A 9 page discussion of the odd circumstances portrayed in this early twentieth century novel depicting the life of young Paul Morel. Lawrence treads on societal prohibitions when he presents the graphical account of the odd relationship which existed between his protagonist and his mother. He does so not because he wants to harness the “shock factor” in order to captivate a reading audience but because he wants to explore the most primal aspects of mankind’s nature.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Gender

    A 5 page paper which examines how gender is presented, in “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald and “The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway, as it relates to American identity. No additional sources cited.

  • Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and Gender

    A 5 page paper which examines how gender is presented, in “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald and “The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway, as it relates to American identity. No additional sources cited.

  • Supernatural and Dreams in The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann and The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov

    This is a 5 page paper discussing the references of dreams and the supernatural in Mikhail Bulgakov’s “The Master and Margarita” and Thomas Mann’s “The Magic Mountain”. Mikhail Bulgakov’s “The Master and Margarita” and Thomas Mann’s “The Magic Mountain” both contain references to dream sequences to allow the characters to escape or mask the reality of life which surrounds them. In “The Master and Margarita”, Bulgakov uses dreams sequences and references to supernatural elements to allow the characters to speak about the underground world of the secret police. As characters are taken for questioning, the details of the abductions by “them” are made possible by the unreality and the distance provided by dreams. In addition, references to the supernatural such as “the Devil” also invoke memories of ancient taboos in society which are known to be punished. Mann’s central character Hans in “The Magic Mountain” has various dreams, daydreams and “vision quests” which allow the character to escape the routine and reality of his life. Already escaping somewhat to the sanatorium in the mountains, Hans has drug and fever induced dreams in which he gains more insight into the actions of man and offers him more freedom and confidence in his own decisions in life. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'Over There, World War II,' and 'I Sing, Too, America' by Langston Hughes

    An 8 page research paper/essay that analyzes two of Hughes poems, "I, too, Sing America" and "Over there, World War II." First, the writer gives a brief biography of the poet, then discusses critical opinion of his work, and then, critically analyzes these two poems. The writer demonstrates how the political content of these poems was aimed at both a black and white audience. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Over There, World War II,' and 'I Sing, Too, America' by Langston Hughes

    An 8 page research paper/essay that analyzes two of Hughes poems, "I, too, Sing America" and "Over there, World War II." First, the writer gives a brief biography of the poet, then discusses critical opinion of his work, and then, critically analyzes these two poems. The writer demonstrates how the political content of these poems was aimed at both a black and white audience. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Religion and Sex Views of Walt Whitman

    A 6 page discussion of the manner in which this noted nineteenth century poet viewed religion and the subject of sex. The author of this paper presents several quotes from Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” These quotes reveal not only the graphic sexual content of Whitman’s work but also demonstrate the poet’s apparent belief that religion was only valid in a non-judgmental sense in that it reflected one’s own inner feelings. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Human Nature and Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

    This 5 page report discusses Conrad’s best-known work and its many layers which ultimately presents a variety of shades of darkness. Not only are there the human conflicts and measures of darkness but there are also social implications presented in terms of the conflict that takes place between what is lawful and what is against the law (morally, logically, and legally), self-restraint compared to personal and uncontrolled self-indulgence and at the core of all that, the conflict between order and chaos. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • ECE and Children's Literature

    This 5 page report discusses the title topic and briefly addresses the many areas in which a teacher’s use of children’s literature can make a significant impact in a young student’s learning processes. Aside from issues related to language acquisition and development, expansion of critical thinking skills, proficiency in reading and writing, there is one very simple and very fundamental reason for using children’s literature in early childhood education. Children love stories! Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence

    A 6 page paper which examines elements of the supernatural, irony, and symbolism seen in D.H. Lawrence’s short story “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” No additional sources cited.

  • Role of the Governess in The Turn of the Screw by Henry Jam

    A seven page paper which offers a stylistic analysis of the governess's role in Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, with reference to participants and processes, deixis, modality and other examples of stylistic devices.

  • Homosexuality in Le Fanu's Carmilla and Wilde's Dorian Gray

    This 7 page paper discusses the homosexual themes in Le Fanu's Carmilla and Wilde's Dorian Gray. Examples given. Quotes cited from texts. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Literature and the Theme of Appearance versus Reality

    A 6 page paper which compares and contrasts “The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams and “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker as they touch on the theme of appearance vs reality. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Modern Society and Literature

    A 5 page paper which discusses and defines literature and examines the role of literature in contemporary society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Twentieth Century British Experimental Literature

    A paper which considers the move away from traditional literary forms and towards the experimental in British literature of the mid-twentieth century, with particular reference to Woolf's To The Lighthouse and Beckett's Happy Days.

  • A Character and Thematic Comparison of Desiree's Baby and Antlers

    A comparison between the themes and characters in Chopin's Desiree's Baby and Bass's Antlers, with particular reference to the exploration of gender roles and sexual morality in the two societies depicted. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • The Lion Aslan in C.S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

    A 4 page paper which analyzes the character of Aslan the lion from C.S. Lewis’ “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature Shifts During Medieval Times

    A 3 page paper which examines how the changes in society led to changes in literature in the Medieval times. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Protagonist's Fate in 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence

    This 5 page paper discusses the fate of Paul, D.H. Lawrence's protagonist in The Rocking Horse Winner. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Image of Mulattos

    A 4 page paper which examines the Mulatto image presented in “Plum Bun” by Jessie Fauset and “Quicksand” by Nella Larsen. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Infant Joy' and 'Infant Sorrow' Poems by William Blake

    A 4 page essay that discusses Blake's intentions with his poems Songs of Innocence and Experience. The writer explicates and contrasts "Infant Joy" and "Infant Sorrow" and also discusses both poems by Blake entitled "The Chimney Sweeper." No additional sources cited.

  • 'The Negro Speaks of Rivers' by Langston Hughes

    A 5 page essay that explicates the many layers of meaning in this poem by Hughes. The writer argues that this poem presents a vision of African American culture and life that was totally different from the one that existed at the time of the poem's publication (the 1920s). No additional sources cited.

  • 'The Negro Speaks of Rivers' by Langston Hughes

    A 5 page essay that explicates the many layers of meaning in this poem by Hughes. The writer argues that this poem presents a vision of African American culture and life that was totally different from the one that existed at the time of the poem's publication (the 1920s). No additional sources cited.

  • Common Themes in Jane Eyre, Silas Marner, and Wuthering Heights

    This 5 page paper analyzes three classic novels for the themes of nature versus nurture: George Eliot's Silas Marner, E. Bronte's Wuthering Heights, and C. Bronte's Jane Eyre. Quotes cited from texts. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Graham Greene's The Destructors and D.H. Lawrence's 'The Rocking Horse Winner'

    A paper which compares and constrasts these two stories, with particular reference to the psychology of the main characters, the dynamics of the relationships which they establish with others, and the underlying tragic themes of the two narratives. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Theme of Sexuality in Works by Sophocles, William Shakespeare, and Toni Morrison

    A 10 page essay that contrasts and compares Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's Hamlet and Morrison's The Bluest Eye. The writer argues that while human society changes, human nature does not and that these works are remarkably consistent in the manner in which they present parental obligation and the hazards of coming of age. Examination of these works shows that each of these authors considers this period to be thwart with peril and that this is particularly true when parents abdicate their responsibility to oversee this process, which includes guiding and protecting their children. No additional sources cited.

  • Bram Stoker's Dracula and Kate Chpin's The Awakening Compared

    A 10 page research paper/essay that examines Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening (1899) and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). The writer argues that these works provide readers with vastly different conceptualizations of fantasy, sexuality and race. Chopin addresses the negative consequences of a woman's sexual awakening and her eventual suicide to escape the restrictions of Victorian society on female life. Stoker creates a fantasy in which an Eastern European monster preys on innocent English women and children. Examination of these two works shows that while these two authors each address common themes, they do so from diametrically opposed positions. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie's HIstory Writing

    A 3 page paper that begins by commenting on the changes in writing history, specifically, the change to the Annales school and Braudel's total history schema. The essay then discusses Ladurie's Montaillou: The Promised Land of Error. The writer discusses how Ladurie uses the total history approach as well as the scientific approach supported by von Ranke. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie's HIstory Writing

    A 3 page paper that begins by commenting on the changes in writing history, specifically, the change to the Annales school and Braudel's total history schema. The essay then discusses Ladurie's Montaillou: The Promised Land of Error. The writer discusses how Ladurie uses the total history approach as well as the scientific approach supported by von Ranke. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Insanity in Comparative Literature

    This 4 page paper examines two works: The Awakening by Chopin and Poe's The Cask of Amontillado. Protagonists in each of these works are discussed in terms of their display of insanity. The characters Edna and Montresor are compared and contrasted Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Symbolism and the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne

    This 4-page paper discusses the symbolism in three Nathaniel Hawthorn stories: "The Birthmark," "Lady Eleanore's Mantle" and "Youg Goodman Brown."

  • Annotated Bibliography for Ernest Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls

    A 3 page annotated bibliography of sorts on Ernest Hemingway’s “For Whom the Bell Tolls.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 1984 by George Orwell and Language's Power

    This 4 page paper discusses Orwell's themes and discussion in regard to langauge. Freedom of speech is discussed in relation to the novel. Quotes cited from novel to support argument. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Common Themes in Literature

    This 5 page paper examines two works--Toa Te Ching and the Age of Iron--and looks for common elements. The values to come from the works are viewed to be similar. No additional sources cited.

  • True Life Stories, Literature, and Issues of Gender, Sex, and Race

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of sex, race, and gender in Toni Morrison’s “The Bluest Eye,” Harriet Jacobs’ “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” Paule Marhsalls’ “Brown Girl Brownstone,” and Henry Roth’s “Call it Sleep.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Time Perceptions in Poetry

    A 4 page explication of four poems dealing with the passage of time: "Sonnet 18"/Shakespare, "Sonnet 75"/Spencer, "The Soote Season"/Howard, and "My Galley"/Wyatt, the Elder. The writer argues that human beings are the only creatures aware of their morality and that this has influenced artistic expression since the dawn of history. This examination of four sixteenth and seventeenth century poets demonstrates that while the topic is universal, the artistic slant of individuals can vary considerably, as the tone of these poems ranges from the morose to the hopeful. No additional sources cited.

  • Presley in The Octopus by Frank Norris

    This 6 page paper discusses the role of Presley in Frank Norris' book, The Octopus. Point of view, themes, brief synopsis, offered. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 0 sources.

  • Vera Figner's Memoirs of a Revolutionist, Ivan Turgenev's Fathers and Sons and Radical Russian Intelligentsia Images

    A 4 page overview of the differing presentations of the Russian Revolution found in Ivan Turgenev's "Fathers and Sons" and Vera Figner's "Memoirs of a Revolutionist". Interestingly, despite the fact that one book is fictional and the other factual, there are many similarities between the various characters in regard to the motivations and ideologies that shape their lives. No additional sources are listed.

  • The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway

    A 5 page essay that examines the principal theme of Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, as it is suggested by the title. At the beginning of his novel The Sun Also Rises (1926), Ernest Hemingway includes an epigraph that consists of two quotations. The first is from Gertrude Stein, an avant-garde American poet who was the emotional center of the group of expatriate American writers living in Paris during the 1920s. This quote describes the generation that came of age during World War I as a "lost generation." The horror of the war had caused this group of young people to lose faith in traditional values, leaving them adrift, without a center, in the fluctuating current of modernism. But also included in the epigraph is a quote from the Bible, from Ecclesiastes, which states that the world endures and the sun continues to rise, which suggests that time and nature will eventually provide a new generation and new hope. Examination of this novel shows that both themes, hopelessness and the hope of rejuvenation, are integral to the structure of the text as a whole. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Fontana, California and Davis's City of Quartz

    This 3-page book examines Davis' City of Quartz, and discusses the history of and comparison with the various parts of the city of Fontana.

  • Rain of Scorpions by Trambley

    This 7 page paper examines this Latina author's 1975 work. The use of characterization is explored and a b it of the author's life is discussed. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Setting and Theme in The Man to Send Rain Clouds by Leslie Marmon Silko

    A 4 page paper which analyzes the theme and setting in Leslie Marmon Silko’s short story “The Man to Send the Rain Clouds.” No additional sources cited.

  • Literary Psychological Growth and Spiritual Transformation

    This 3 page paper examines many works of great literature and touches on their messages as it relates to certain characters. Whether or not they grow spiritually or psychologically is discussed. Some works included are Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper. Several other works are noted. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Sandra Brown's Mirror Image

    A 5 page review of the book “Mirror Image” by Sandra Brown. No additional sources cited.

  • Moral Attributes and History of Balzac's Colonel Chabert

    This 3-page paper discusses Balzac's Colonel Chabert, notes the story based on its times (post-Napoleonic France) and discusses whether virtue or evil survived the day. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Early Snow' by Mary Oliver

    A 3 page essay that discusses the imagery in Mary Oliver's poem "Early Snow." The writer states that this is a lyrical description of an early snow fall. Examination of this poem shows that, first of all, the poet concentrates on how the snow looks as it covers familiar objects in the landscape. Then, the poet goes on to internally explore the sense of awe and amazement that she feels watching the snow. These musings lead her to consider humanity's place in the scheme of things, as represented by the natural world. No additional sources cited.

  • Postcolonial Literature and Symbols

    This 8 page paper examines two works--The Sand Child and The Multiple Child-- and examines them in the context of the time and place in which they were written. Gender themes are explored. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'Nineteen' by Elizabeth Alexander

    A 4 page explication of Alexander's poem "Nineteen, which captures the essence of her style, which is free flowing and lyrical. Explication of this poem shows that Alexander, like other experts of the free verse style such as Whitman, has the ability to capture the essence and spirit of a time, place and age through the voice of her youthful narrator/protagonist, which expresses the poet's impressions and memories in free verse. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Sociopolitical Classes of Plato and Their Parallels

    A 15 page research paper that examines Plato's sociopolitical classes as outlined in the Republic and also his Theory of the Soul. This literature review, first of all, discuss Plato's theory of the soul and show how he extrapolates on this idea in the Republic to describe his conception of an ideal state. Then, a separate literature review examines the topic of social class within American society to determine if there are parallels between Plato's conceptualization of social class and current day American reality. Bibliography lists 16 sources.

  • Literature and Issues of Gender and Race

    This 6 page paper analyzes and compares Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, to the elements found in Marquez's work, One Hundred Years of Solitude for ways each author addresses race and gender. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Greek Values in Homer's 'The Iliad'

    A 4 page essay that examines Greek values in the Iliad. In his epic poems, the Iliad and the Odyssey, the ancient Greek poet Homer praised numerous qualities and values. "Patriotism, heroism, loyalty, resistance to temptations, truthfulness, generosity, honesty and hospitality" are just a few of the virtues that "Homer praised and exalted" (Christian and Greek philosophy, 2003, p. 15). This examination of Homer's Iliad focuses on what this epic poem tells the modern reader concerning the importance of Greek values, specifically heroism, honor and solidarity, in Greek society. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen and the Themes of Love, Marriage, and Money

    A 6 page paper which examines how the characters of Marianne and Elinor feel about money and its relationship to love and marriage in Jane Austen’s novel “Sense and Sensibility.” No additional sources cited.

  • 'Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift' by Jonathan Swift

    A 4 page essay that analyzes Jonathan Swift's poetic commentary on his own death. Swift (1667-1745) is one of the greatest satirists of all time. His wit and critical viewpoint of society did not exclude himself as a topic. In his poem "Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift," he addresses how he imagines his own decline, death and the response of his so-called friends and public. The underlying theme in this poem is that profuse shows of concern and compassion serve to cover the basic self-interest of the individual, who is enormously glad that the sufferer is not himself. Likewise, Swift lampoons his own reactions to the success of others. Examination of this work shows how Swift uses the symbol of pride to point out the follies inherent in human behavior. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'I HAD been hungry all these years' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page explication of Emily Dickinson's poignant poem "I HAD been hungry all the years." In this poem, Dickinson offers images of what life's banquet is liked when viewed by someone who feels like an outsider. Dickinson was a recluse most of her life and seldom ventured from her home. Examination of this poem suggests that, at some point in her life, she had the opportunity to experience more than her solitary existence and that the "plenty" of this occurrence was both painful and revealing to her. No additional sources cited.

  • Discussion and Summary of The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

    A 3 page paper which summarizes and discusses Alice Sebold’s novel “The Lovely Bones.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Oedipus Rex, the Book of Genesis, and Destiny

    A 4 page paper which discusses how destiny plays a part in the Book of Genesis in the Bible and in the classic Oedipus Rex. No additional sources cited.

  • Epic Poem 'Beowulf' and Comparison of the Dragon and Grendel

    A 6 page paper which compares and contrasts two of Beowulf’s opponents and analyzes their symbolic significance. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Impact of the Great War on Western Literature

    A 4 page essay that discusses the impact of the “Great War,” that is, World War I on Western literature. World War I is known for its “mindless squandering of human life with negligible results” (Hull 17). During its era, it was known as the Great War, the war to end all wars, as well as the war that would make the world “safe” for democracy. The Great War accomplished none of these purposes and, when it was over, the survivors were gripped by grief, guilt, rage and, in the case of one German lance corporal, a young man named Adolf Hitler, by the desire for revenge (Hull 17). The Great War had another significant effect in that it had a tremendous impact on the course of modern Western literature. The collective consciousness of both Europe and America was forever changed by World War I and this change was reflected in the literature produced both during the Great War and in the decades afterward. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Robert Frost/The Road Not Taken

    A 4 page essay that analyzes Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken.” There are crucial decisions in life that influence the nature that the person’s life takes from that moment onward. For a Christian, one such decision is when the individual decides to accept the gift of Salvation and follow Christ. This crucial decision sets the path or course for the person’s life. Robert Frost beautifully dramatizes the significance of this type of momentous decision in his poem “The Road Not Taken.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Comparison and Contrast: Alice Walker and James Baldwin

    A 4 page comparison and contrast between Alice Walker’s Everyday Use and James Baldwin’s Sonny’s Blues. No additional sources cited.

  • Development of Literature in the Romantic Era

    A 4 page paper which examines the development of era during the Romantic Era. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Sylvia Plath, Mirror & Metaphors

    A 5 page research paper/essay that discusses 2 poems by Sylvia Plath, who was born in 1932 to Aurelia and Otto Plath in Boston, Massachusetts and died in 1963 by her own hand, committing suicide just a few months after her thirtieth birthday (Inness 10-13). Talented, young, beautiful, with two small children—despite the depression caused a separation from her husband--Plath’s suicide remains an enigma that critics draw upon when facing the task of deciphering the meaning of her poetry and her life. Looking specifically at two of her poems, “Metaphors,” which is dated March 20, 1959 and “Mirror,” which is dated October 23, 1961, it is possible to discern something of the disintegration of Plath’s mindset between writing these two works. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Marriages: Their Eyes Were Watching God

    A 4 page paper which examines arranged marriages v love marriages based on Sora Neale Hurston’s novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. The paper argues that in reference to the novel arranged marriages fail in comparison to love marriages. No additional sources cited.

  • How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster

    A 3 page paper which examines the work How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Quotations from Frankenstein

    This 4 page paper uses direct quotes from "Frankenstein" to discuss the characters of Frankenstein and the monster, and the themes of the novel. It argues that Frankenstein is ultimately less human than his creation. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Need for Hard-Back Books

    A 3 page essay that discusses why hard-back books are better than reading books online. Reading a book is not the same as reading text on a computer screen. This is true for several reasons. First of all, there is the immediacy of hard-back book, as everything the reader needs is there, at the fingertips. There is also the factor of portability, that is, not everyone has a laptop or a book reader. Also, there is the problem of copyright and issues pertaining to access, which seem likely to continue to constitute obstacles to Internet access to recent books. Taking these points individually, the value of hard-back books is self-evident. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • American Literature: Realism

    A 7 page paper which examines various authors and periods in American literature as they offer images of realism. The literature examined is Kate Chopin’s The Storm, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper, and Stephen Crane’s The Open Boat. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Alice Walker/Everyday Use

    A 3 page research paper that first briefly discusses biographical background on author Alice Walker and then discusses the themes and characterization used in her short story “Everyday Use.” Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Awakening by Kate Chopin

    A 3 page analysis of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Alice Walker’s Everyday Use

    An 8 page paper which compares conflicts of the characters in Alice Walker’s short story Everyday Use. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Black Snow by Liu Heng

    An 8 page analysis of Liu Heng’s work Black Snow. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Women in Ancient Literature and Now

    This 6 page paper discusses women in “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” “The Iliad” and “Antigone” and how they differ from women today. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Shakespeare’s Influence in English Literature and Language

    This 10 page paper discusses Shakespeare’s influence on the English language and literature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Mallarme, Baudelaire and Goethe

    This 4 page paper discusses the poem “Afternoon of a Faun” by Mallarme; and the poem “Correspondences” by Baudelaire; and how these two symbolic works compare to Goethe’s works. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Dr. Faustus and Dr. Jekyll

    A 4 page paper which examines the descent of Dr. Faustus and Dr. Jekyll in Marlowe’s The Tragical History of Dr. Faust and Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. No additional sources cited.

  • Saving Face: An Analysis of George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”

    This 6 page paper discusses George Orwell’s short story, “Shooting an Elephant.” Bibliography lists 2 sources

  • Gulliver’s Travels by Swift

    A 10 page analysis of Jonathan Swift’s novel Gulliver’s Travels. No additional sources cited.

  • Protagonists: Twain, Austen, and Potok

    A 4 page paper which examines the role of the protagonist in Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Emma by Jane Austen, and My Name is Asher Lev by Chaim Potok. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Dyson: Come Hell or High Water

    This 3 page paper discusses the concept of framing as explained by Michael Eric Dyson in his book “Come Hell or High Water,” and shows how that concept was used to denigrate blacks in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Tree Symbolism in “A Separate Peace”

    This 3 page paper discusses the symbolism of the tree in John Knowles’ novel “A Separate Peace.” Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Federico Garcia Lorca/Play Trilogy

    A 3 page research paper/essay that discusses the Federico Garcia Lorca’s play trilogy. The editors of the New England Review add a biographical note to their publication of Federico Garcia Lorca’s poem “Siguiriya’s Way,” which identifies Lorca as one of the greatest poets and dramatists of modern Spain (Lorca, 2005, p. 96). This poem mixes sensuality with the ever-present threat of violence, which is as theme that is prominent in Lorca’s work. Three of Lorca’s best-known plays are his trilogy: “Blood Wedding,” “Yerma,” and “The House of Bernarda Alba.” Examination of these plays demonstrates how Lorca uses the elements of melodrama to represent the presence of overwhelming sexual desire within the context of the negotiated power. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Beowulf, Tempest, Don Quixote/Their Lasting Appeal

    A 7 page essay that examines 3 works of great literature. “Beowulf,” the Anglo-Saxon epic poem by an unknown poet; Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”; and “The History of Don Quixote de la Mancha” by Miguel de Cervantes illustrate the characteristics of a great work of literature that cause it to endure. Examination of these three great literary works demonstrates that each one continues to resonant with modern readers because they accurately reflect human nature. Additionally, each work demonstrates expert use of such features as characterization and plot construction. Also, each author’s use of language is lyrically beautiful and expertly executed. No additional sources cited.

  • Blake and Wordsworth

    A 6 page essay that offers 2 3-page essays: one on William Blake’s “Chimney Sweep” poems and one on William Wordsworth’s “The World is Too Much With Us Late and Soon.” The writer in each case uses the poems to discuss each poet’s poetic philosophy and style. No additional sources cited.

  • Crane/Maggie: A Girl of the Streets & Naturalism

    An 11 page research paper/essay on Stephen Crane’s late nineteenth century novel Maggie: A Girl of the Streets. This paper consists of an 8 page essay, plus a 3 page annotated bibliography and 1 page proposal on the topic that the essay addresses. The writer argues that Crane is a naturalist writer and that Maggie is intentionally crafted to avoid the problems associated with realism and to express a naturalistic point of view. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Crane/Maggie: A Girl of the Streets & Naturalism

    An 11 page research paper/essay on Stephen Crane’s late nineteenth century novel Maggie: A Girl of the Streets. This paper consists of an 8 page essay, plus a 3 page annotated bibliography and 1 page proposal on the topic that the essay addresses. The writer argues that Crane is a naturalist writer and that Maggie is intentionally crafted to avoid the problems associated with realism and to express a naturalistic point of view. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Winkie, Road & Corruption in Society

    A 4 page essay that looks at 2 books. Cormac McCarthy in The Road and Clifford Chase in Winkie offer two very different commentaries on the corruption, narrow-mindedness and hubris that colors the present political and social atmosphere in the United States. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Environment in Literature: Ecocriticism, Ecofeminism and the Concept of Dwelling

    This 15 page paper examines writings by Barbara Kingsolver and Greg Garrard to explore the ways in which authors use, or examine the use of nature in literary works. It pays specific attention to the ecofeminist nature of the heroine of Kingsolver’s book Prodigal Summer, and also considers the concept of dwelling and farming with regard to sustainability. Finally, it defines ecocriticism and illustrates its use.

  • Literature of the New American Republic

    A 9 page research paper that discusses the formation and evolution of American literature. The writer discusses the effect of the Revolution on literature, the factors that influenced, the nature of American identity and westward expansion and the first generation of significant American writers. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Religious Symbolism in Hurston’s “Sweat”

    This 4 page paper discusses the religious symbolism in Zora Neale Hurston’s short story “Sweat.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Mercerism and Electric Sheep

    This 4 page paper discusses the way “Mercerism” works in Philip K. Dick’s novel, “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Bluest Eye & The Color Purple

    A 5 page essay that discusses Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, which are similar in that both authors use the structure of their novels as a tool that facilitates the achievement of their thematic purposes. In The Bluest Eye, Morrison’s references to the Dick-and-Jane reading primer aids Morrison in contrasting the mainstream cultural ideal, that is, the world represented in the Dick-and-Jane stories, against the violence of her protagonist’s world. This contrast also serves to underscore the way in which mainstream white ideals are assimilated by black Americans and contribute to their dysfunction and unhappiness. Similarly, in The Color Purple, Walker uses her novel’s epistolary format to dramatize her protagonist’s evolution from an insecure, brutalized girl toward an independent, secure woman with her own voice. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Science Fiction Shakespeare

    This 4 page paper comprises a memo to Shakespeare suggesting he write a science fiction screenplay based on the character of Ariel in “The Tempest,” and then it discusses five stories and what makes them science fiction tales. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Gilgamesh and Job

    A 3 page discussion of Gilgamesh, in the Epic of Gilgamesh, and Job, in the Book of Job from the Bible are heroic figures. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Analysis of Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal

    A 6 page essay that analyzes Swift’s “A Modest Proposal.” The writer offers an examination of Swift’s use of language in the essay, as the research analyzes how Swift accomplished his purposes, which were to shake the British public into seeing beyond their prejudices, biases and self-interest. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • If Shakespeare Wrote Science Fiction, Ariel Would Use a Transporter

    This 4 page paper discusses five short science fiction stories and what it is about each of them that classifies them as being in that genre. It also suggests ways in which Shakespeare could use science fiction techniques and themes to rewrite his play “The Tempest” as a screenplay for Spielberg to direct. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • If Shakespeare Wrote Science Fiction, Ariel Would Use a Transporter

    This 4 page paper discusses five short science fiction stories and what it is about each of them that classifies them as being in that genre. It also suggests ways in which Shakespeare could use science fiction techniques and themes to rewrite his play “The Tempest” as a screenplay for Spielberg to direct. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine

    A 3 page paper which examines H.G. Wells’ novel The Time Machine as it involves Time and time travel. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Character of Mordred in Literature

    This paper consists of five pages and discusses how the character of Mordred has appeared throughout literature with the emphasis being on how he is portrayed by T.H. White in The Once and Future King. Seven sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • Sky Lee’s Disappearing Moon Café/Chinese-Canadians

    A 7 page paper that discusses Sky Lee’s 1991 novel Disappearing Moon Café concerns five generations of a Chinese Canadian family whose saga is shaped by cultural, economic and social factors that pertain to both China. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 4 Essays, Antigone, Bible Verses

    A 5 page research paper that consists of 4 separate 1.25 pages papers. Two are on Bible verses, one on Sophocles’ Antigone and 1 on a poem by Sappho. Each paper lists 3 sources in the bibliography.

  • Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Blues of the African-American Experience

    In ten pages this paper examines how the literary artistry of Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston represented the uniqueness of the African-American experience through their stylistic interpretations of blues music. Seven sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • The Persuasiveness of Socrates in Plato's Apology

    This 5 page paper discusses the trial and defense put forward by Socrates, recorded by Plato. The paper argues that Socrates was highly persuasive and put forward attractive arguments, but it was unlikely he would have been found innocent given the background of his teachings and the recent history in Athens at the time of his trial. The writer discusses the background to the trial and looks at the approach taken by Socrates when he defends himself. The bibliography cites one source.

  • Reason vs. Emotion in Dickens and Austen

    This 4 page paper examines “Hard Times” by Charles Dickens and “Sense and Sensibility” by Jane Austen and argues that it’s better to be emotional than to be dedicated solely to reason. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Working Life in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

    5 pages in length. Like ants banded together as a means by which to survive, John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" exemplifies the inherent struggles of class distinction. Indeed, the depiction of toil and strife was to represent the very essence of life for the wayward travelers in search of a day's wage. The pittance of work they were able to find only served to sustain them for the next journey they would face, once again in search of work to support a meager and terribly unstable lifestyle. The writer discusses how for the Joads and all the other people searching for survival during the Depression, work was not merely a means to an end, but rather was the means upon which they staked their entire existence. No additional sources cited.

  • Identity and Influences of Culture and Society in the Characters of Heathcliff, Catherine, and Edgar in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights

    12 pages in length. Although written over one hundred years ago, Emily Bronte's "Wuthering Heights" captures the anguish and troubled times both men and women met head-on when confronted with the social and cultural dilemmas. The paradox here is that although the Catherine, Heathcliff and Edgar were of a different social status altogether, the experiences they were forced to deal with as individuals were not at all dissimilar from one another. Even though society prides itself on the “you’ve come a long way, baby” way of thinking, have social and cultural discrimination in fact come that far? By analyzing the identity of these three fictional characters, the writer discusses the social and cultural influences that are imposed upon them at Thrushcross Grange and Wuthering Heights, as well as how these influences serve to construct their entire identity. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Ideology and 'Englishness'

    5 pages in length. This paper focuses upon the obvious ideological conflict of England and Englishness in the context of the works of two authors, Graham Green's England Made Me and John Betjeman's Collected Poems. The seeming contradictions in the text and viewpoints are discussed. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Host of the Beast' and 'Host of the Lamb' in Billiards at Half Past Nine by Heinrich Boll

    A 5 page essay that examines the significance of the 'host of the beast' and the 'host of the lamb' in Boll's masterpiece, 'Billiards at Half-Past Nine.' No additional sources cited.

  • The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner and the Technique of Stream of Consciousness

    A 7 page paper that argues the point that the personalities and philosophies of the characters in William Faulkner's The Sound and The Fury are most effectively presented and emphasized in the order in which the author presents the four sections of the story. Discussed is Faulkner's combination of the stream-of-consciousness technique and the first person narrative style to present an inside view of the depth of the story's sense of chaos as well as his effective manipulation of time sequencing to emphasize this chaos. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The Call of the Wild Still Calls

    A 5 page paper that analyzes the concepts of animal intelligence and primeval memory presented by Jack London's 1903 novel The Call of The Wild and compares these concepts with the forces behind the modern Animal Rights Movement as well as the Feminist Movement. Included are views on the relationship between humans and animals as expressed by feminist leaders and by ecologists and rights activists. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • European Enlightenment and Literature

    This 9 page paper explores literature in the eighteenth century in Europe, known as the Age of Enlightenment, an age in which reason and common sense, as demonstrated by the scientific method were put forth as the real remedies of society's ills and 'progress' was seen as a law of human development. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • European Enlightenment and Literature

    This 9 page paper explores literature in the eighteenth century in Europe, known as the Age of Enlightenment, an age in which reason and common sense, as demonstrated by the scientific method were put forth as the real remedies of society's ills and 'progress' was seen as a law of human development. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Brown Girl, Brownstones by Paule Marshall and Selina's Assimilation Quest

    A 5 page paper that examines Paule Marshall's 1959 novel Brown Girl, Brownstones and discusses the factors that make this novel a universal inside observation of immigration and its challenges. The basic story and central theme of the novel are outlined and corresponding parallels pertaining to the universal experience of immigration are noted. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • American Literature and the Issue of Class

    This 10 page thesis paper explores the proletarian movement in the thirties. The paper supports the idea that literature highlighting class differences spans the entire twentieth century. The works which are a primary focus is Sinclair's The Jungle and Odets's Waiting for Lefty. The concept of class is viewed in terms of how it is portrayed in American literature as well as its relationship with political ideology. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • American Literature and the Issue of Class

    This 10 page thesis paper explores the proletarian movement in the thirties. The paper supports the idea that literature highlighting class differences spans the entire twentieth century. The works which are a primary focus is Sinclair's The Jungle and Odets's Waiting for Lefty. The concept of class is viewed in terms of how it is portrayed in American literature as well as its relationship with political ideology. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Homoeroticism and Aestheticism in 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' by Oscar Wilde

    A 6 page paper discussing how these two influences work together in the novel. Wilde is able to employ his devotion to aestheticism to weave the tale of Dorian Gray and its attached homoeroticism because he gives all involved a lifestyle in which things can be hidden or contorted, but always used for the main characters' benefit. In this work, aestheticism and homoeroticism work together in a manner that if either were missing, then likely the work would not retain its enduring attraction. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Victorian Mindset in the Works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Robert Louis Stevenson

    A 12 page research paper that uses Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes' story 'The Sign of the Four' and Robert Louis Stevenson's 'Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde' as a springboard to exploring the Victorian mindset as suggested by these two narratives. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Literary Considerations of Greed

    This 5 page paper looks at Willy Loman of Miller's Death of a Salesman and Milkman in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon to explain how these characters are driven by greed. The characters are compared and contrasted. The subject of greed and the American Dream are explored as thematic elements of these works. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Considerations of Greed

    This 5 page paper looks at Willy Loman of Miller's Death of a Salesman and Milkman in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon to explain how these characters are driven by greed. The characters are compared and contrasted. The subject of greed and the American Dream are explored as thematic elements of these works. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Today's Military Actions and Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front

    This 5 page paper focuses on the Remarque novel and compares its descriptions with the reality of military conflicts today. Several quotes from All Quiet on the Western Front are included. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literature's Classic Adventure

    This 5 page paper supports the thesis that adventure is included in many works because human beings thrive on conflict and would not be content with peace. Homer's Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid and Dante's Inferno are examined. The concept of adventure and justifications for inclusion are explored. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • The Eighteenth Century Novel The Italian by Ann Radcliffe

    A 5 page analysis of Ann Radcliffe's eighteenth century novel of Gothic romance, 'The Italian.' The writer examines Radcliffe's concepts of good and evil as portrayed in the novel. No additional sources cited.

  • Samoan Culture in the Fiction of Wendt and Figel

    An 11 page research paper that examines Sia Figiel's Where We Once Belonged and Albert Wendt's Pouliuli. The writer argues that the location of Samoa plays an integral role in each of these novels. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of Heart of Darkness and Ancient Mariner

    This seven-page-paper compares and contrasts Heart of Darkness , by Joseph Conrad and Ancient Mariner , by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • Beloved by Toni Morrison

    This 5 page paper analyzes the characters Sethe and Beloved, their motivations and psyche. The relationship between mother and daughter is highlighted. No additional sources cited.

  • Happiness Perspectives of Langdon Gilkey and Mary Gordon

    A 7 page comparison that looks at Langdon Gilkey's autobiographical account of life in a Japanese internment camp, Shantung Compound, and Mary Gordon's novel concerning an embittered young woman who must learn to cope with life, Final Payment. The writer argues that these two very different works come to similar conclusions concerning the nature of happiness. No additional sources cited.

  • Written on the Body by Jeanette Winterson

    A 5 page analysis of Jeanette Winterson's provocative novel 'Written on the Body,' in which the author offers an intriguing psychologically oriented novel that engages the reader's imagination through her expert manipulation of language. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Meneseteung' by Alice Munro

    This 3 page paper provides insights into Munro's story that appears in the Friend of My Youth anthology. The paper focuses on how artistic expression is exemplified. The Almeda Roth character is highlighted. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Metamorphosis' of Franz Kafka

    This 4 page paper explores this Kafka work that is replete with symbolism. The relationship between Franz Kafka and his father is explored in this paper that ties the author's life with aspects of the infamous work. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • American Society and Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin

    A 5 page paper which examines what James Baldwin's short story, "Sonny's Blues," represents, and how it serves as an inherent commentary on American society. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literature in The Gilded Age

    A 6 page analysis of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum and Looking Backward by Edward Bellamy. The writer argues that each of these writers incorporated into their novels aspects and characteristics of the age in which they were written—the 'Gilded Age' at the close of the nineteenth century. No additional sources cited.

  • Mass Media and Its Influence

    A 5 page paper that examines the tremendous influence of the mass media as presented in The Interplay of Influence: News, Advertising, Politics, and the Mass Media by authors Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Karlyn Kohrs Campbell. Discussed are the three sections in which the book is divided, sections that detail the influence and role of the mass media in news presentation, advertising, and political campaigns respectively. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Shawl by Cynthia Ozick

    When one sits down to read the novella, The Shawl, by Cynthia Ozick, it is difficult to know in advance the amount of emotional investment one is likely to make, however, reader: be warned, this is a story that will grip your heart and not let go. This 5 page paper explores the metaphors and symbols of the story in an effort to understand the greater meaning meant by the author. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Portrayals of Satan and Adam in Paradise Lost by John Milton

    6 pages in length. The writer compares and contrasts Adam to Satan in relation to free will and temptation. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Semantic Analysis of Ar'n't I a Woman?' by Sojourner Truth

    5 pages in length. Sojourner Truth exposes her defiance toward the system's rules, which, as she points out, have all been designed by men, for men. Eloquent in both style and approach, Truth does not allow her gender to get in the way of insisting that nowhere in the framework of human rights has it been established that men are in any way more deserving than women. The writer discusses the semantic interpretation of one passage of Truth's historic speech. No additional sources cited.

  • Knowledge Theme in 'Paradise Lost' by John Milton and Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 5 page research paper that examines the use of the theme of knowledge in Christopher Marlowe's late sixteenth century play, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, and John Milton's mid-seventeenth century epic poem, Paradise Lost,. The writer argues that each author addresses the issue of predestination and free will in determining the relationship of knowledge to God's will. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Knowledge Theme in 'Paradise Lost' by John Milton and Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe

    A 5 page research paper that examines the use of the theme of knowledge in Christopher Marlowe's late sixteenth century play, The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, and John Milton's mid-seventeenth century epic poem, Paradise Lost,. The writer argues that each author addresses the issue of predestination and free will in determining the relationship of knowledge to God's will. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, and Verisimilitude

    A 5 page analysis of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis and The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien and their use of verisimilitude in these children's novels. The writer argues that despite the fantastical aspects of these stories, the settings come across as real and the characters as true because of the degree of detail that each authors includes, as well as the way that the plots adhere to reality within the framework of each novel. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Interior Life' of Slaves and Toni Morrison

    8 pages in length. Slavery has shaped what Toni Morrison calls "the interior life" of slaves and former slaves, meaning the way in which an individual feels about himself, herself, the world, other people – with particular emphasis placed upon people of the dominant white race. Slavery has constructed the interior life of African-Americans, inasmuch as narrative style became the tradition in African-American literature. The distinctive elements of this literary style is quite easily recognized by their intensely personal attributes and quest to educate readers about racial prejudice and the tormented path each author has forcibly followed. The writer discusses Morrison's "Beloved," as well as Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass's writings as they relate to the interior life. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Sherri Tepper's The Gate to Women's Country

    (5pp) Sherri Tepper's cast of both ordinary and extraordinary people play out in her powerful 1988 novel, whose significance goes beyond sex, to deal with the toughest problem of all, the challenge of surmounting humanity's most dangerous flaws so we can survive together - despite ourselves. despite ourselves.

  • Two Solitudes by Hugh MacLennan

    5 pages in length. The establishment of polity is at the core of Huge MacLennan's 'Two Solitudes,' effectively implementing the means by which protagonists Anthanase and his son Paul confront social forces larger than themselves. From the old school and forever bound by his stalwart religious beliefs, Anthanase discovers rather late in life that things do not need to stay the same in order to gain opportunity; in fact, the manner by which he confronts social forces larger than him is to challenge the very system he had heretofore so passionately guarded. Paul, being of a completely separate generation, is influenced by his desire to achieve while trapped within two very divergent worlds. Inasmuch as he is a member of both sides if only by birthright, he confronts overwhelming social forces larger by aspiring to what he believes carries the most significance toward his ultimate political release. No additional sources cited.

  • Focus Groups A Practical Guide for Applied Research by Richard Krueger

    A 5 page paper that examines the 1994 book by author and professor Richard Krueger entitled Focus Groups: A Practical Guide for Applied Research. Discussed are the book's purpose, points and presentation, its contributions and shortcomings, and its recommended readership. Also included is a brief discussion on the differences between quantitative and qualitative research techniques. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • English Lit Questions in 9 short papers

    A 26 page paper that offers a hodgepodge of short essays on Eng. Lit. questions that cover the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as well as creative writing exercises that deal with this period. Writers covered include Yeats, Owen, Conrad, Dickens, Eliot and more. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Epic 'Beowulf' and Anglo Saxon Culture

    This 5 page paper discusses aspects of the Anglo-Saxon culture as evidenced by the classic poem, Beowulf. Discussion includes aspects of culture, government, family ties, and religion. Citations given from text and quoted. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Nurture and Nature in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights

    This 5 page paper takes the idea of a person's basic nature and shows how no amount of culture can change it. This idea is related to the main theme of the novel. Quotes given from the book and cited in MLA format. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Human Nature and the Poetry of Walt Whitman

    This 5 page paper examines the life of Walt Whitman and how he perceive human nature and the meaning of life. Excerpts from his poems, "O Captain! My Captain!" and "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" are examined as supporting evidence. Bilbiography lists 3 sources.

  • Spirituality as a Concept in Black American Literature

    This 5 page paper discusses the issue of African American Literature and the evidence of spirituality in that medium. Furthermore, this paper cites many African-American writers and their works as examples. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Spirituality as a Concept in Black American Literature

    This 5 page paper discusses the issue of African American Literature and the evidence of spirituality in that medium. Furthermore, this paper cites many African-American writers and their works as examples. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'The Children's Hour' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    A 5 page research paper that critically analyzes Longfellow's poem "The Children's Hour." The writer argues that this poem speaks directly to feelings that are basic to all humanity and this is why his verse, although no longer critically acclaimed, is so well loved and read throughout the world. The writer also discusses Longfellow's reputation and how his work is regarded. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'The Children's Hour' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    A 5 page research paper that critically analyzes Longfellow's poem "The Children's Hour." The writer argues that this poem speaks directly to feelings that are basic to all humanity and this is why his verse, although no longer critically acclaimed, is so well loved and read throughout the world. The writer also discusses Longfellow's reputation and how his work is regarded. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Truth in Poetry

    A 5 page paper which examines three different things. The paper discusses the phrase “The truth shall set you free” as it relates to specific literature. The paper then discusses the meaning of William Blake’s comment “Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks of Religion,” and lastly the paper discusses a particular poem whose title and author is unknown. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Color Purple and Catcher in the Rye Compared

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares Alice Walker's The Color Purple and J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye. The writer argues that these novels share common characteristics because they both feature the voices of young adolescents as their protagonists. The writer contrasts the emotional growth and maturity of each protagonists, while also comparing their basic plot lines. No additional sources cited.

  • Values According to William Faulkner, Willa Cather, and D.H. Lawrence

    A 9 page research paper that examines D.H. Lawrence's "Rocking-Horse Winner," Willa Cather's "Paul's Case," and William Faulkner's "Barn Burning" as examples of short fiction in which a young protagonist is challenged by materialism, either their own or their parent's. In each story, the point is made that values influence not only how life is lived, but also how it is perceived. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • American Society in Three Literary Views

    A 7 page essay that contrasts and compares three works: Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall," Mark Twain's "Corn-Pone Opinions," and Countee Cullen's poem "Incident." The writer argues that in each case, the author endeavors to reflect to the American people certain aspects of society that are contradictory to the prejudices that were evident during the time when these works were created. In other words, these works reflect aspects of the society in which they were created and, in doing so, provide a critique of that society. No additional sources cited.

  • Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five and Yon Yonson's Cyclic Poem

    A 6 page paper which examines how the Yon Yonson poem in Kurt Vonnegut’s novel “Slaughterhouse Five” essentially reflects the narrative and structural form of the story. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • The Theme of Identity in Derek Walcott's Omeros

    This 8 page paper discusses the theme of identity in the epic poem by Derek Walcott, called Omeros. The characters of Achille and Plunkett are analyzed to show a search and discovery of self identity in the wake of two disparate cultures on St. Lucia. Many quotes and examples included and cited from text. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • James McBride's The Color of Water and Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club

    A 5 page paper which compares and contrasts the themes offered by Amy Tan in “The Joy Luck Club” and James McBride in “The Color of Water.” No additional sources cited.

  • Omeros by Derek Walcott and Character Identity

    A 9 page paper which examines the characters of Achille, Hector, Helen, Ma Kilman, and Plunkett as symbolic figures who represent Walcott’s search for identity in his novel/epic poem “Omeros.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Gods Will Have Blood by Anatole France

    5 pages in length. Evariste Gamelin, Parisian painter and student of Jacques Louis David, leads readers on a climb up the social ladder that begins with good intentions yet ends with overwhelming oppression and death. Gamelin's myopic idealism serves to crush the very purpose for which he lived his life prior to the Revolution; as soon as he realized the imminence of war, he was first to display his loyalty to the cause – no matter if that cause would ultimately cost thousands of innocent lives. Before becoming the monstrous magistrate of the Revolutionary Tribunal, Gamelin sports a decidedly more humane and compassionate persona, even to such an extent of providing a hungry mother and child with a pittance of bread. Once swept up on the frenzy of battle, however, he completely loses touch with his previous self and metamorphoses into an outright killer who has no regard for human life. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Yvain' by Chretien de Troyes and Relationship Reciprocity

    A 5 page essay that analyzes the reciprocity of relationships in Chretien de Troyes' twelfth century epic poem Yvain, the Knight of the Lion. The writer argues that the message that these relationships transmit to the reader is that that give and take is necessary to the maintenance of society in general. No additional sources cited.

  • Cultural Literature Issues

    A 9 page paper which examines several different stories and novels that deal with cultural realities. The novels or stories examined are “The God of Small Things” by Arundhati Roy, “Maru” by Bessie Head, “Jasmine” by Bharati Mukherjee, “Secrets” by Nuruddin Farah, “Moth Smoke” by Mohsin Hamid, “Grain of Wheat” by Ngugi wa Thiong'o, “The Guide” by R.K. Narayan, “Ambigious Adventures” by Cheikh Kane and “Death of a King’s Horseman” by Wole Soyinka.

  • James P. Gray's Why Our Drug Laws Have Failed and What We Can Do About It ”: A Discussion of the Premises of Author James P Gray in Comparison to the Philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Machiavelli, Locke, Hobbes, and Ro

    A 5 page exploration of the question of whether drug laws are serving a positive societal function. Gray contends that not only are drug laws ineffective, they are counterproductive and potentially devastating. This contention is evaluated in light of the contentions of numerous other philosophers. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Chinese Literary Examples The Fox Fairy and The World Inside a Pillow

    A 6 page examination of these two examples of Chinese literature. This paper presents a brief outline of the key points of each of these stories and discusses the interblending of actual historical events, geography, and time with fiction. An emphasis is placed on the unique role of intertextualization. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literary Social Criticism

    A 5 page essay that analyzes Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Henry David Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience," and Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" as examples of literature in which the author provides social criticism. The writer asserts that in each of these works, the author argues, not only that an individual can fight the system, but also that it is his or her duty to do so. No additional sources cited.

  • How Eighteenth Century London Society Was Shaped by the Role of Women in 'The Rambler,' 'Evelina' and 'Moll Flanders'

    14 pages in length. There has rarely been a time in the history of mankind that women have not had to struggle in order to assert their worth as a gender. From the time when males first declared patriarchal authority over their female counterparts, women have fought – in various ways and with various results – to be treated both equitably and respectfully. Literature has long reflected this perpetual struggle between the genders, most often taking the side that support patriarchal control; however, a slow but steady change began occurring in eighteenth century London society that helped nurture a growing metamorphosis, which included Samuel Johnson 'Rambler' (Misella), Daniel Defoe's 'Moll Flanders' and Frances Burney's 'Evelina: Or, the History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World.' Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • Zora Neale Hurston's 'The Gilded Six Bits' and Alice Walker's 'Everyday Use'

    This 5 page paper analyzes Walker's "Everyday Use" and Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits". Specifically, this paper highlights their portrayal of women, black-on-black issues and mother-child relationships. Bibliography lists 0 sources.

  • Analysis of Literary and Film Versions of The Color Purple

    A 5 page paper which examines how a literary work will manifest itself in a very different way when put into film. The novel/film discussed is “The Color Purple” by Alice Walker, film directed by Steven Spielberg. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and the Use of Newspapers

    A 10 page paper which examines the use of newspapers in literature. The texts discussed are “Sister Carrie” by Theodore Dreiser and “Manhattan Transfer” by John Dos Passos. Bibliography lists 4 additional sources.

  • Postcolonial Literature in Morocco and Kenya

    A 7 page paper assessing the primary features of postcolonial literature, focusing on the Kenya and Morocco through the work of Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Fatima Mernissi. Both of these views of postcolonial literature provides readers with a basis for asking “what if” questions. Though the degrees to which each goes vary greatly, each maintains that foreign influence inexorably and irrevocably changed their cultures, providing the primary feature of postcolonial literature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Literary Analysis of Jeffrey Eugenides' The Virgin Suicides and Timothy Findley's Not Wanted on the Voyage

    A 6 page paper which compares and contrasts the authors, their writing styles, they ways in which they convey themes, symbols, storylines, settings and characterizations and, in particular, considers the role of women in their respective novels. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf and its Literary Contribution

    A 5 page paper which examines Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse” as it contributed to literature. No additional sources cited.

  • Moths, Life, and Death

    This is a 3 page paper, that is based on Woolf’s essay “The Death of the Moth” and Thurber’s “The Moth and the Star”. There are two sources cited.

  • Literature, Poetry, and Self Reliance

    A 5 page paper which examines the theme of self reliance in the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Robert Frost’s “Mending Wall,” Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery,” Chinua Achebe’s “Dead Man’s Path” and Sophocles’ “Antigone.” Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'The Death of the Moth' by Virginia Woolf

    This 5 page paper is a discussion of Woolf's essay, "The Death of the Moth". This paper examines how eloquently Woolf speaks of death and how the death of the moth can be likened to how human beings should value life. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Emily Dickinson's Views of Self and Society

    A 5 page essay that examines three of Dickinson's poems that deal with the self, how Dickinson saw herself and her society, "I'm Nobody! Who are You?," "Much Madness is divinest Sense," "The Soul selects her own Society." The writer argues that these poems give the reader insight into the remarkable personality of this nineteenth century poet. No additional sources cited.

  • Emily Dickinson's Views of Self and Society

    A 5 page essay that examines three of Dickinson's poems that deal with the self, how Dickinson saw herself and her society, "I'm Nobody! Who are You?," "Much Madness is divinest Sense," "The Soul selects her own Society." The writer argues that these poems give the reader insight into the remarkable personality of this nineteenth century poet. No additional sources cited.

  • Women's Roles in Homer's 'The Odyssey'

    This 5-page paper focuses on the role the women played in Homer's The Odyssey, and how their roles helped add to the story's adventures.

  • Christian Allegory and 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

    A 5 page research paper, in which the writer argues that the traditional interpretation of "Mariner," which sees the poem as Christian allegory, comes closest to capturing its meaning. The writer also explores how the poem has been interpreted by various critics. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Christian Allegory and 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

    A 5 page research paper, in which the writer argues that the traditional interpretation of "Mariner," which sees the poem as Christian allegory, comes closest to capturing its meaning. The writer also explores how the poem has been interpreted by various critics. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • A Reading of Emily Dickinson's 'After Great Pain…'

    A 5 page essay that offers an explication of Dickinson's poem "After Great Pain a Formal Feeling Comes." The writer argues that, in this poem, Dickinson indicates the various stages of recovery from traumatic pain. Her verse delineates the various stages that an individual goes through after experiencing great pain: the philosophical questions that one asks; the mechanical feeling of detachment; and, also, that the pain eventually ceases, if one survives it. No additional sources cited.

  • A Reading of Emily Dickinson's 'After Great Pain…'

    A 5 page essay that offers an explication of Dickinson's poem "After Great Pain a Formal Feeling Comes." The writer argues that, in this poem, Dickinson indicates the various stages of recovery from traumatic pain. Her verse delineates the various stages that an individual goes through after experiencing great pain: the philosophical questions that one asks; the mechanical feeling of detachment; and, also, that the pain eventually ceases, if one survives it. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Coole Park and Ballylee, 1931' by William Butler Yeats

    A 5 page essay that examines Yeats' assertion in this poem that 'We were the last romantics…' (line 41). The writer argues that this is a fair assessment and that examining the context of the poem demonstrates Yeat's version of romanticism, which is embedded in his love of the Irish country. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Coole Park and Ballylee, 1931' by William Butler Yeats

    A 5 page essay that examines Yeats' assertion in this poem that 'We were the last romantics…' (line 41). The writer argues that this is a fair assessment and that examining the context of the poem demonstrates Yeat's version of romanticism, which is embedded in his love of the Irish country. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Student Supplied Readings on Being Human

    This 5 page paper incorporates a number of readings submitted by a student to address the issue of being human. Several themes are discussed , including consciousness, war and its effects, and how technology affects man's communion with nature. No bibliography.

  • Freudian Psychology and Ghosts by Henrik Ibsen

    A 3 page paper which examines the parallels that exist between Henrik Ibsen’s “Ghosts” and Freudian concepts. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Tartt's The Secret History and the 'Fatal Flaw' Concept

    A five page paper which considers the concept of the 'fatal flaw' in Tartt's "The Secret History" and the way that their fascination with the darker side of the picturesque affects the lives of Richard and the others. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Impact of Nathaniel Hawthorne's Writings on Children

    5 pages in length. Nathaniel Hawthorne understood the inner workings of his fellow man, rising to the challenge on many occasions to point out flaws, vulnerabilities and shortcomings inherent to being human. While this approach comprised a significant portion of his writings, there was still enough room for the celebrated author to infuse a bit of literary cheer into the hearts of children through two publications: Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys and Tanglewood Tales. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Ramayana Version by R.K. Narayana

    A 4 page discussion of this abbreviated version of classic tale from Indian culture. This paper presents the thesis that while R.K. Narayana's rendition of "The Ramayana" is too abbreviated to offer much scholarly use, it occupies a critical place in world literature in that it introduces the world (particularly the West) to one of the most important tales of Indian literature, a tale that would be too long and too complex to capture the attention of most western readers without the type of abridgment that Narayana has elicited. Narayana was in fact writing for a specific audience within a specific societal framework. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 3 Women in Odysseus's Life in 'The Odyssey' by Homer

    A 4 page paper which examines the roles of these women in Odysseus’s life and how they affect the protagonist as well as the epic poem, “The Odyssey.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Poems of William Blake and Theodicy

    An 8 page paper which examines how the theme of theodicy is interwoven into Blake’s poetic works, “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience” such that the reading of a single poem can be influenced or altered by its relationship to other poems in the collection. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Human Isolation in The Country Doctor and Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

    A paper which looks at man's isolation from society and Kafka's use of surrealism, with particular reference to Metamorphosis and The Country Doctor.

  • Human Isolation in The Country Doctor and Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

    A paper which looks at man's isolation from society and Kafka's use of surrealism, with particular reference to Metamorphosis and The Country Doctor.

  • The Aspects of Literature Analysis

    A paper which looks at various aspects of literary analysis, including the interaction between audience and text and the socio-cultural insights which can be elicited from the written text. Bibliography lists 5 sources

  • Julia's Petticoat by Herrick

    A 3 page explication of "Julia's Petticoat," by seventeenth century poet Robert Herrick. The writer argues that Herrick creates a seduction poem that uses the extended metaphor of his love's petticoat as an elaborate and poetically lyrical way of referring to the sexual allure of the woman who wears it. Examination of the poem shows that Herrick focuses on the effect that this undergarment has on the poet as he finds it suggestive of the woman's beauty and allure, so much so that the occasional glimpse of petticoat seems to excite him as much as the woman herself. No additional sources cited.

  • Christian Symbolism in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

    A 3 page paper which summarizes C.S. Lewis’ “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” and then examines the Christian symbolism within the story. No additional sources cited.

  • Persuasion by Jane Austen and Overhearing

    A 5 page paper which examines how the overhearing or indirect information about others and actions illustrate how heroine Anne Elliot blossoms into her own woman with a firm and individualistic set of attitudes and opinions about herself and others by the conclusion of the novel. No additional sources are used.

  • 'Black Magic' by Dudley Randall

    A 3 page essay that explicates "Black Magic" by Dudley Randall, which is also known by the title "Blackberry Sweet." The writer argues that this homage to the beauty of a young black woman is in the tradition of English seduction poems. No additional source cited.

  • Part One of Faust by Goethe

    A 3 page essay that examines Goethe's Faust, Part I and argues that while it is Faust who is the presumed genius, the man of letters and learning and Margaret, his love, is but a simple peasant girl, it is Margaret who has learned from her experiences at the end of Goethe's Faust, Part I, not the learned doctor. This is evidenced by Faust's continued association with the devil, Mephistopheles, while Margaret rejects them both, repents, and is, therefore, taken to heaven. No additional sources cited.

  • "Political, Philosophical, Religious, Cultural, Social, Literary and Artistic Value of 'Poem of The Cid"

    4 pages in length. The philosophical, political, social, religious, cultural, literary and artistic values present in Poem of the Cid reflect the comprehensive nature medieval literature sought to project; that this tale is replete with detailed implications of each value speaks to the manner by which medieval literature served as a definitive – if not embellished – form of social statement. No additional sources cited.

  • Depictions of Nature in the Poetry of Dickinson and Frost

    A 3 page essay that contrasts and compares 2 poems. Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost are both evocative poets whose verse shows each poet's gift for reflecting natural scenes with photographic accuracy, conveying to the reader not only how the scene looked, but also what it made the poet feel and the thoughts it conjured. Two representative poems, "The Wind begun to knead the Grass" by Dickinson and "Design" by Frost, demonstrate the marked similarities between the ways in which these two great American poets utilized diction and poetic imagery in their work and also how they differed. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Assassination of John F. Kennedy Portrayed in Libra by Don DeLillo

    7 pages in length. DeLillo, who represents the real in a way "many postmodernists argue is impossible" (Hutchinson 117), brings to the table an entirely unique interpretation of postmodernism; while his approach to the events surrounding the Kennedy assassination can be readily correlated with conventional postmodern thought, it nonetheless extends beyond such conventionality to the point where staunch postmodernists must stretch their own understanding of the concept to reach DeLillo's central theme. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Satan Imagery in 'Paradise Lost' by John Milton and The Bible

    An 8 page paper which compares and contrasts how these two literary works portray evil. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • History of Rasselas by Samuel Johnson

    This 5 page paper examines this work and looks at it in light of Aristotle's ideas. The concept of happiness is explored. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • The Indo Caribbean Experience as Found in A House For Mr. Biswas

    10 pages in length. Identity is a critical theme all throughout the story that borrows directly from the Indo-Caribbean experience and cultural experience. To not only understand but also accept one's place within the larger concept of society is something Mr. Biswas struggles with for his entire life; that he is unable to rectify what he deems wrong in his day to day existence – the death of his father, a controlling and uncaring mother, a wife with no backbone and an extended family by marriage that has little respect for him – he ultimately develops an inferior sense of himself while at the same time working hard to find his own place in the world. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Chinese Literary Works

    This 5-page paper discusses five works of Chinese literature. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Symbols Used in Poetry and in the Bible

    A 6 page essay that explores the meaning of symbol in 4 works: Matthew 13:24-30; "The Boston Evening Transcript" by T.S. Eliot; "The Lightning is a Yellow Fork" by Emily Dickinson and "The Road Less Traveled" by Robert Frost. The writer offers some biographical facts on each author; then discusses the meaning of the poem and then how it uses symbols to convey that meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Psychological Theory and 'I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings' by Maya Angelou

    3 pages in length. Cultivating such intestinal fortitude after growing up surrounded by fear, self-loathing, sexual abuse and a sense of abandonment, Maya Angelou proved how one can rally back amidst what may otherwise be a lost and troublesome existence. Examining her remarkable path from an awkward and insecure childhood to a poised and self-assured adulthood, one may well attribute much of this progression to John Dewey's Progressivism Theory. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Sonnet 54' in Amoretti by Edmund Spenser

    A 7 page paper that explicates Spenser's Sonnet 54. This close reading of the poem offers a line-by-line interpretation of the poem, discussion of its meter and rhyme scheme, and also Spenser's use of poetic devices. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • A Review of the Eighteenth Century Play The Love Suicides At Sonezaki

    A 4 page discussion of the early eighteenth century play by Japanese dramatist Chikamatsu Monzaemon. This paper discusses the sexual and religious intonations of the play and discusses it from Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, Roman Catholic, and modern American perspectives. No additional sources are listed.

  • Interpretation of 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot

    A 5 page essay that offer interpretation of Eliot's famous poem. The writer argues that Prufrock realizes that he has aged without ever really having lived and there is the suggestion at one point in the poem that he toys with the idea of asking a woman to marry him. He does not, however, do this because of his fear of rejection. As this suggests, Eliot's poem captures perfectly the psychic state of a shy, insecure person who feels trapped in a "hell" created by his social paralysis, which keeps him from ever doing anything, from ever really living, out of fear of looking foolish, as well as the fear of embarrassment that results from having tried and failed. As this suggests, examination of this poem shows how it is a psychological profile of a modern individual whose life is meaningless due to his internalization of what he feels is expected of him. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Interpretation of 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot

    A 5 page essay that offer interpretation of Eliot's famous poem. The writer argues that Prufrock realizes that he has aged without ever really having lived and there is the suggestion at one point in the poem that he toys with the idea of asking a woman to marry him. He does not, however, do this because of his fear of rejection. As this suggests, Eliot's poem captures perfectly the psychic state of a shy, insecure person who feels trapped in a "hell" created by his social paralysis, which keeps him from ever doing anything, from ever really living, out of fear of looking foolish, as well as the fear of embarrassment that results from having tried and failed. As this suggests, examination of this poem shows how it is a psychological profile of a modern individual whose life is meaningless due to his internalization of what he feels is expected of him. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'Blackberry Sweet' by Dudley Randall

    A 3 page essay that explicates this seduction poem by Dudley Randall. Also known as "Black Magic," this poem concerns Randall's description of a black girl's beauty and the effect that this has on the poet. No additional sources cited.

  • Passages Compared in Rain of Gold by Victor Villasenor

    A 3 page essay that compares two passages from Victor Villasenor's Rain of Gold, a real-life account of his Mexican-American family background. The writer discusses two passages that highlight the texture and nuance of the mother/son relationship and the importance of the matriarch in Mexican culture. No additional sources cited.

  • Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison and Music

    This 7 page paper discusses why music is such an integral part of Ralph Ellison’s classic novel. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literary Genres Modernism and Postmodernism

    A 6 page paper which examines the journey of the hero in modern and postmodern works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Homer's 'The Iliad' and Achilles' Shield

    A 3 page essay that discusses the moving images on the shield of Achilles, which is wrought before the final battle with Hector. The writer contrasts the story told by these images with the plot of the poem and speculates about their purposes within the overall structure of Homer's epic. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • 'Cross' by Langston Hughes

    A 3 page essay that explicates Langston Hughes' poem "Cross," which refers to the "cross" that the narrator has to bear, which is his mixed-race heritage. Due to this heritage, the narrator of the poem feels that he has no cultural "home," as he does not fit with either white or black society. Unlike current society in which mixed-raced individuals, such as golfer Tiger Woods, are regarded simply as "people," in the first half of the twentieth century, which is when this poem was composed, this was not the case. No additional sources cited.

  • Comparison of the Poems by Christina Rossetti and John Milton

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares works by Milton and Rossetti. John Milton (1608-1674), in his epic poem Paradise Lost, and Christina Rossetti (1830-1894), in her poem The Goblin Market, each present narratives in which women are tempted by sin that is represented allegorically by fruit. In each poem, there are also depictions of acts of love. But while these features indicate that the poems bear similarities, they also have fundamental differences that deal mainly with the poet's depiction of women. Eve is depicted as shallow, easily deceived and not capable of thinking as rationally as Adam. Rossetti's heroine, Lizzie, on the other hand, is clever, self-sacrificing, and saves her sister from sin through her actions. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Comparison of the Poems by Christina Rossetti and John Milton

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares works by Milton and Rossetti. John Milton (1608-1674), in his epic poem Paradise Lost, and Christina Rossetti (1830-1894), in her poem The Goblin Market, each present narratives in which women are tempted by sin that is represented allegorically by fruit. In each poem, there are also depictions of acts of love. But while these features indicate that the poems bear similarities, they also have fundamental differences that deal mainly with the poet's depiction of women. Eve is depicted as shallow, easily deceived and not capable of thinking as rationally as Adam. Rossetti's heroine, Lizzie, on the other hand, is clever, self-sacrificing, and saves her sister from sin through her actions. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Analysis of the Poem 'The Elixir' by George Herbert

    A 3 page explication of the poem featured in the 1633 collection of religious poetry, “The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations.” No additional sources are used.

  • Analysis of the Poem 'The Elixir' by George Herbert

    A 3 page explication of the poem featured in the 1633 collection of religious poetry, “The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations.” No additional sources are used.

  • Edgar Allan Poe's Poetry and Death

    A 6 page paper which examines how the deaths of people close to him influenced Poe’s poems. Specifically considered are “Alone,” Annabel Lee,” “The Raven,” “To My Mother,” and “Ulalume.” Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Estates Satire and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

    This 6 page paper discusses Estates Satire and how Chaucer uses it in his poem.

  • Estates Satire and Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

    This 6 page paper discusses Estates Satire and how Chaucer uses it in his poem.

  • Nature and Poetic Views Contrasted

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares four poems, --"A Sick Rose" by William Blake; "Apparently with no surprise" by Emily Dickinson; "Digging" by Seamus Heaney; and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" by Robert Frost. The writer argues that in these poems the reader encounters brilliant imagery that perfectly invokes scenes of nature in the reader's imagination. However, examination of these four poems shows that the poets intend their verse to send very different messages. Blake and Dickinson picture nature as beautiful, but unfeeling. Their poems see nature as evidence of a divine power that can be capricious in its cruelty. Frost and Heaney, on the other hand, picture nature as soothing, positive and more benign. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Nature and Poetic Views Contrasted

    A 5 page essay that contrasts and compares four poems, --"A Sick Rose" by William Blake; "Apparently with no surprise" by Emily Dickinson; "Digging" by Seamus Heaney; and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" by Robert Frost. The writer argues that in these poems the reader encounters brilliant imagery that perfectly invokes scenes of nature in the reader's imagination. However, examination of these four poems shows that the poets intend their verse to send very different messages. Blake and Dickinson picture nature as beautiful, but unfeeling. Their poems see nature as evidence of a divine power that can be capricious in its cruelty. Frost and Heaney, on the other hand, picture nature as soothing, positive and more benign. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Nature Imagery in the Works of Zora Neale Hurston and William Wordsworth

    A 3 page paper which discusses the nature imagery as presented in Wordsworth's poem "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey" and Nora Zeale Hurston's novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God." Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Laura, In Williams’ Glass Menagerie

    A 3 page essay that discusses the character of Laura from Tennessee Williams’ poignant play “The Glass Menagerie.” There are a number of similarities between Laura Wingfield and the small glass animals that she collects. As with her small glass animals, Laura is fragile, both in health and temperament. Also, like her animals, which are a beautiful expression of art, Laura herself has an ethereal beauty. This metaphor also connects Laura with nature as the shapes of her glass suggest the natural world, which is distant from the play’s urban setting. As this suggests, the glass menagerie itself can be viewed as a metaphor for understanding Laura’s inner nature and Romantic beauty. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Sam Shepard: Cruising Paradise: Tales

    This 3 page paper discusses Sam Shepard’s book “Cruising Paradise: Tales.” Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Significance of Jesus Christ’s Death and Resurrection as Decay and Renewal in William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury

    In nine pages this paper analyzes how the author symbolically represents the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ in the novel and the importance of this religious symbolism to the story of the dysfunctional Compson family and the decline of the Southern aristocracy. Five sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • Native American Oral Tradition: Parallels in the Literature

    A 5 page analysis of Gerald Vizenor's ““Word War in the Word Wards” (a chapter in “Bearheart the Heirship Chronicles”) and “An Insatiable Emptiness” by Evelyn Lau. No additional sources are listed.

  • Edgar Allan Poe, Suicidal Tendencies, and ‘The Tell-Tale Heart’

    In ten pages this paper considers the life of author Edgar Allan Poe, how his works were influenced by his depression and suicidal tendencies, and how suicidal tendencies manifest themselves in his famous short story, ‘The Tell-Tale Heart.’ Ten sources are cited in the bibliography.

  • Native Experience: Literature and Film

    A 4 page paper which examines, comparing and contrasting, native experiences as seen through fiction and film. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Everyday Life in Literature

    This 6 page paper discusses ordinary life as depicted in John Updike’s story “A&P,” and then expands on the example of Sammy to include other books, and why they are considered to be realistic literature. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Hagar and Lottie: The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence

    A 5 page paper which discusses the development of the relationship between Hagar and Lottie in Margaret Laurence’s The Stone Angel. No additional sources cited.

  • American Ethnic Literature

    This 7 page paper defines what American ethnic literature is, and what it means, and why it’s important. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Female Sexuality in House of Bernarda Alba

    A 3 page essay on Federico Garcia Lorca’s play “The House of Bernarda Alba,” which is part of a trilogy in which each play expresses the way that women were “crushed by Spanish customs and social life” during the early twentieth century (Jones and Jones 13). In Bernarda Alba, the cast is virtually all women, as there is only one brief appearance by a male. In this play, Garcia Lorca uses the theme of suppressed sexuality to underscore the corrosive nature of Spanish cultural expectations towards women. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Treatment of Women in Literature

    This 5 page paper looks at the way the representation of women has evolved throughout literature, from “Frankenstein” in 1818 to “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,” published in 2005. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • A Rose for Emily

    A 3 page paper on William Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Modern Vampire

    This 5 page paper discusses the evolution of the vampire from the cruel bloodsuckers of legend to the suave, even romantic, anti-heroes of today. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • W.B. Yeats/An Irish Airman Foresees His Death

    A 3 page essay that analyzes this Yeats poem. During World War I, millions of young men lost their lives. In his poem “An Irish Airman foresees his Death,” Irish poet W.B. Yeats explores why one particular young man, a pilot, engages in that awful conflict and how he views his death, which he knows is sure to come. The words that Yeats selects and the pilot’s manner of speaking tells the reader a great deal about how Yeats imagined this man’s character. No additional sources cited.

  • Gatsby & The American Dream

    A 4 page essay that discusses this classic novel. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby overtly concerns the story of a man trying to win back his wartime lover and recreate his idolized version of their affair. However, beneath this romantic plot, there runs a much deeper and more serious theme, which addresses the decay of the American Dream that Fitzgerald witnessed in the years following World War I, which is when the US experienced a period of extreme opulence and sudden wealth. Fitzgerald portrays the American Dream as having been tarnished by the rampant materialism of American culture and its social and moral values. While his theme is evident throughout the novel, it is particularly evident in Fitzgerald’s characterization of Gatsby, Daisy, and Nick, with each character underscoring a different but related point. No additional sources cited.

  • Derrida, Literature and “Midsummer Night’s Dream”

    This 10 page paper examines Derrida’s theory of literature and whether or not it is useful in teaching the subject; it also touches on how it might be applied to Shakespeare’s wonderful comedy, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Shange/For Colored Girls…

    A 4 page essay that consists of 4 short answers to specific questions on Ntozake Shange’s “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide when the Rainbow is Enuf.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Ambition of Lady Macbeth

    This 11 page paper examines Shakespeare's classic work. It is claimed that Lady Macbeth's ambitions take center stage as her husband is psychologically manipulated into committing a murder for the gain of the throne. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Women Rising Above Oppression in The Color Purple

    A 6 page paper which examines female characters in The Color Purple by Alice Walker and how they rise above oppression. No additional sources cited.

  • Gary Soto/”Oranges”

    A 3 page explications of “Oranges,” a poem by Gary Soto, which is evocative of innocence, as it tells of the narrator’s experience on his first “date” with a girl. This memory is obviously a profound one for the narrator and the reason for the memory’s significance in this man’s life is largely conveyed through the poem’s lyrical imagery and symbolism. A close reading of the poem and examination of this feature demonstrates this point. No additional sources cited.

  • Gary Soto/”Oranges”

    A 3 page explications of “Oranges,” a poem by Gary Soto, which is evocative of innocence, as it tells of the narrator’s experience on his first “date” with a girl. This memory is obviously a profound one for the narrator and the reason for the memory’s significance in this man’s life is largely conveyed through the poem’s lyrical imagery and symbolism. A close reading of the poem and examination of this feature demonstrates this point. No additional sources cited.

  • “Chimpanzee Politics” and Human Behavior

    This 10 page paper takes the book “Chimpanzee Politics” by Frans de Waal as a springboard for answering five questions about the chimps described in the book, and how their behavior can be related to human behavior. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Where the Heart Is

    A 5 page paper which discusses the film and the book Where the Heart Is. No additional sources cited.

  • 2 Carpe Diem Poems

    A 4 page essay that explicates 2 carpe diem poems. Carpe diem, a Latin phrase meaning “cease the day,” is a favorite theme found in seventeenth century poetry. Two of the most famous carpe diem poems from this era are Robert Herrick’s “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” and Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress.” An examination of these poems indicates that while Herrick makes effective use of imagery in order to argue his carpe diem seduction theme, Marvell’s poem is the most effective. No additional sources cited.

  • 2 Carpe Diem Poems

    A 4 page essay that explicates 2 carpe diem poems. Carpe diem, a Latin phrase meaning “cease the day,” is a favorite theme found in seventeenth century poetry. Two of the most famous carpe diem poems from this era are Robert Herrick’s “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time” and Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress.” An examination of these poems indicates that while Herrick makes effective use of imagery in order to argue his carpe diem seduction theme, Marvell’s poem is the most effective. No additional sources cited.

  • Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night/On Film

    A 7 page research paper/essay that discusses 2 film adaptations. While there are numerous film adaptations of Shakespeare’s tragedies, the Bard’s comedies have proven to be notoriously difficult to translate successfully to the screen (Crowl 69). However, Kenneth Branagh’s Much Ado About Nothing (1993) and Trevor Nunn’s Twelfth Night (1996) successfully overcome the challenges inherent in a film adaptation of a Shakespearean comedy, as both films were artistically and commercially successful. First of all, these films overcome the problems of translating the plays from the restrictive confines of the stage to the visual options available in film. They also combine aspects of Hollywood storytelling and cinematic technique that are familiar to modern audiences with Shakespeare text and, thereby, imbue the classic plays with fresh energy and postmodern aesthetic. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Hunter Thompson/Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    A 7 page analysis of Hunter S. Thompson's 1971 novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which is quasi-autobiographical, as Thompson gives himself and his lawyer, Oscar Acosta, the pseudonyms of Raoul Duke (a Doctor of Journalism) and Dr. Gonzo, who is described as being a 300-pound Samoan. A central premise of this trip to Las Vegas is that tourism can be used as a means for addressing the concept of the American Dream. A surface reading of Thompson's satirical novel tends to see it as celebratory of the 1960's drug culture; however, closer examination of this novel reveals it as a scathing critique of American culture and specifically the American dream, and also a denunciation of the drug culture of the 1960s. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature of the Renaissance and the Works of Ben Jonson, Francis Bacon, and John Milton

    In six pages this paper examines Renaissance literature and discusses how these authors and their writings reflect this period and genre. Five sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Linda in Death of a Salesman

    A 3 page analysis of Linda in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. No additional sources cited.

  • Written on the Body, The Color Purple

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares ideas about love in Jeanette Winterson's novel Written on the Body and the film The Color Purple, which was adapted from the novel by Alice Walker. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Thrill of Transgression: “Frankenstein” and “Manfred”

    This 6 page paper examines “Manfred” by Lord Byron and “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley and argues that they are both examples of Gothic literature; that Frankenstein is self-deceiving while Manfred is overly self-aware; and that both protagonists transgress boundaries: Frankenstein cross the line between life and death, and Manfred breaks the taboo against incest. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • An Extra Chapter for “Johnny Tremaine”

    This 3 page paper discusses what a writer might do to create an additional chapter for the children’s book “Johnny Tremaine.”

  • Johnny Tremain

    A 3 page essay that addresses aspects of this novel. Esther Forbes' classic coming-of-age novel set in the Revolutionary era has as its protagonist a talented, intelligent, but somewhat arrogant fourteen-year-old boy, Johnny Tremain. The writer describes Johnny's maturation process, the novel's themes and other aspects. No additional sources cited.

  • The Theme of Obsession in “Frankenstein”

    This 5 page paper discusses the types of obsession portrayed in “Frankenstein,” including the obsession of Frankenstein for his experiments in creation; his subsequent obsession with fleeing from the creature; and the creature’s obsession with revenge. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Showalter, Culture and Literature

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Elaine Showalter's A Literature of Their Own, which offers a challenge to the narrowness of the traditional canon of what is considered to be valuable contributions by women to English literature. In so doing she directly addresses the way in which culture has had an influence on women's literature. Showalter's theoretical perspective presents women's writing in terms of being a subculture, which evolved in direct reaction to the elements in mainstream patriarchal culture that tended to trivialize women's experience and role in society. No additional sources cited.

  • Showalter, Culture and Literature

    A 3 page essay that analyzes Elaine Showalter's A Literature of Their Own, which offers a challenge to the narrowness of the traditional canon of what is considered to be valuable contributions by women to English literature. In so doing she directly addresses the way in which culture has had an influence on women's literature. Showalter's theoretical perspective presents women's writing in terms of being a subculture, which evolved in direct reaction to the elements in mainstream patriarchal culture that tended to trivialize women's experience and role in society. No additional sources cited.

  • Mattheissen: “The Snow Leopard”

    This 5 page paper argues that Peter Mattheissen’s book “The Snow Leopard” is as much about his journey of self-discovery as it is a story about his explorations of the Himalayas. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Submissive Characters In Children's Literature: Influence Upon Self-Perception In Female Children

    6 pages in length. Children's literature is replete with visual imagery of worlds that exist beyond reality's realm; to equip a child with a story that takes her outside her established precepts is to fortify that young mind with additional learning tools for life. However, not every lesson learned within the pages of children's literature is of a positive nature, inasmuch as some messages drive home antiquated gender identity roles that impose significantly distorted perceptions upon naïve and vulnerable readers. When cast as submissive characters by virtue of their gender, children are taught that such famous "people" as Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty represent how women are expected to be in the real world; without benefit of truly understanding the fantasy component of children's literature, they take with them these skewed perceptions and unknowingly incorporate them into their own psychological development. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Blues and James Baldwin’s Short Story “Sonny’s Blues”

    In three pages this thematic analysis of James Baldwin’s ‘Sonny’s Blues’ focuses on the symbolic significance of ‘the blues’ and what the color and the music represent throughout the story. Four sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Submissive Characters In Children's Literature: Influence Upon Self-Perception In Female Children

    6 pages in length. Children's literature is replete with visual imagery of worlds that exist beyond reality's realm; to equip a child with a story that takes her outside her established precepts is to fortify that young mind with additional learning tools for life. However, not every lesson learned within the pages of children's literature is of a positive nature, inasmuch as some messages drive home antiquated gender identity roles that impose significantly distorted perceptions upon naïve and vulnerable readers. When cast as submissive characters by virtue of their gender, children are taught that such famous "people" as Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty represent how women are expected to be in the real world; without benefit of truly understanding the fantasy component of children's literature, they take with them these skewed perceptions and unknowingly incorporate them into their own psychological development. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Sexual Imagery/Depression in 3 Poems By Robert Frost

    A 5 page essay that analyzes 3 poems by Frost. Robert Frost is one of America's best-loved poets. His use of evocative and lyrical natural imagery speaks to a broad audience. However, in addition to the folksy wisdom, there is tension in many of Frost's poems that subtly intimates both his battles with lifelong depression, as well as conflicted feelings toward sex. The following examination of 3 of Frost's poems, "Acquainted wit the Night," "The Road Not Taken," and "Birches," demonstrates that below the literal surface meaning of these poems, Frost invites the reader to look deeper into his perception. No additional sources cited.

  • Sexual Imagery/Depression in 3 Poems By Robert Frost

    A 5 page essay that analyzes 3 poems by Frost. Robert Frost is one of America's best-loved poets. His use of evocative and lyrical natural imagery speaks to a broad audience. However, in addition to the folksy wisdom, there is tension in many of Frost's poems that subtly intimates both his battles with lifelong depression, as well as conflicted feelings toward sex. The following examination of 3 of Frost's poems, "Acquainted wit the Night," "The Road Not Taken," and "Birches," demonstrates that below the literal surface meaning of these poems, Frost invites the reader to look deeper into his perception. No additional sources cited.

  • Love in The Horse Dealer’s Daughter by D.H. Lawrence

    A 3 page paper which examines how Lawrence represents love in the short story The Horse Dealer’s Daughter. No additional sources cited.

  • Predestination, Life, and Relationships in Passing by Nella Larsen

    7 pages in length. Expressing one's feelings on family relationships, love, predestination and following dreams is not such an unusual occurrence; that is, of course, unless one is doing so in the early part of the twentieth century. Back during the time Nella Larsen wrote her groundbreaking story "Passing," these issues were dealt with in the privacy of one's own thoughts. Indeed, it was highly irregular to delve into such concentrated and personal subjects as these, especially in front of strangers. However, Larsen recognized the need to address the sometimes more difficult aspects of life, which she achieved so eloquently in "Passing." Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'The Crowd' by Ray Bradbury

    A 5 page paper that presents a critical analysis and discussion of the major theme and primary idea presented in Ray Bradbury's 1943 short story The Crowd. This discussion includes a brief history of Bradbury's writing career and examines how the writer's life experiences and observations are reflected in The Crowd as well as in the majority of his works. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Setting in The Lamp at Noon by Sinclair Ross

    4 pages in length. In Sinclair Ross's "The Lamp at Noon," the desolation of the expansive and haunting setting mirrors the sentiment of life, marriage and the glimmer of hope. This short story set against a backdrop of emotional and scenic barrenness is indicative of the prolific writer's inherent ability to pursue even the most complex of concepts. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature of the Late Eighteenth Century and Humanism

    A 7 page research paper that examines the way the themes of nature and humanism in late 18th century and how this reflects a natural progression from earlier eras. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Literature of the Late Eighteenth Century and Humanism

    A 7 page research paper that examines the way the themes of nature and humanism in late 18th century and how this reflects a natural progression from earlier eras. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Derek Walcott, Chinua Achebe, and Non Native Writers Use of English

    A 6 page research paper and analysis of the use of English by Chinua Achebe in 'Things Fall Apart,' and Derek Walcott in 'The Star-Apple Kingdom.' Both of these writers choose to express himself in the language of colonial oppression— English— rather then in a language native to his region. The writer explores why. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Night Flight by Antoine de Saint Exupery and Leadership

    A 5 page analysis of the theme of leadership in Antoine de Saint-Exupery's novel 'Night Flight.' The writer argues that the two protagonists represent the way that brave individuals have always challenged the unknown, and, in so doing, have advanced the race as a whole. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson

    A 5 page summation and analysis of 'Snow Falling on Cedars,' David Guterson's first novel, which uses the trial of a Japanese-American as a springboard for a narrative that explores issues of racism and injustice on a small island in Puget Sound, not long after the Japanese-American internment, which occurred during World War II. No additional sources cited.

  • Harlem's Poet Laureate Langston Hughes

    A 5 page research paper that examines the life an career of Langston Hughes. The writer, in particular, regards those elements in Hughes' life that influenced his writing, such as black music. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of the Short Stories 'A Christmas Memory' by Truman Capote, 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D.H. Lawrence and 'The Child by Tiger' by Thomas Wolfe

    A 5 page comparison of themes between three short stories--—'A Christmas Memory' by Truman Capote; 'The Rocking Horse Winner' by D. H. Lawrence; and 'The Child by Tiger' by Thomas Wolfe. The writer explores similarities and differences between these three. No additional sources cited.

  • Propaganda and Literature Relating to British Imperialism

    The literature of Imperialist England included themes based on social Darwinism, the crisis of faith, imperialism, poverty and progress. This 7 page paper explores the issues in Milton's Paradise Lost; Behn's Oroonoko and Swift's Gulliver's Travels that pertain to the cultural context of the British Empire. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Langston Hughes' 'Salvation'

    A 5 page paper which examines and analyzes the representation of the persona in the piece "Salvation" by Langston Hughes. No additional sources cited.

  • Southern Locations and Their Importance in the Works of William Faulkner

    ( 6 pp) Introduction Faulkner's main concern lies with depicting the historical development of the South, the degeneration of values, the effect of racism and the psychological state of mind of Southerners In apocryphal Yoknapatawpha County, setting for most of his fiction and patterned after his real-life home in Oxford and Lafayette County, Mississippi, Faulkner writes of regional characters who tell of economic and social frustrations. This famous address in American literature is a familiar location to literature students of all ages who encounter it in such stories as Barn Burning, A Rose for Emily, and That Evening Sun. ibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Countee Cullen's 'Heritage' and African American Ancestry Perceptions

    A 5 page paper that examines early twentieth-century poet Countee Cullen's perception of his African-American ancestry as expressed in his poem "Heritage". Discussed are the conflicts and contradictions Cullen found in this perception and the factors and emotions that contributed to these conflicts. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Works of Playwright Lillian Hellman

    This 6 page paper takes a glimpse at this playwright's interesting life and then goes on to compare and contrast two of her early works. The Children's Hour and The Little Foxes are discussed in depth. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

  • Struggle for Ethnic Identity by Pyong Gap Min

    5 pages in length. The United States population reflects a significant diversity of nationalities. Indeed, some of the inherent difficulties and challenges that face these immigrants are great, which are effectively demonstrated in Pyong Gap Min's book entitled "Struggle For Ethnic Identity : Narratives By Asian American Professionals." Gap Min's book points out – through a number of personal narratives – that one of the main obstacles in overcoming this ongoing struggle for Asian ethnic identity in the United States is the absence of cultural recognition. A strong cultural foundation proves difficult in a society that urges other ethnic peoples to adopt the American way of life. No additional sources cited.

  • Michael Shaara's Killer Angels

    This 5 page paper provides a discussion on this historic novel by Michael Shaara. The work focuses on the Battle of Gettysburg and has been critically acclaimed. The theme of bravery is explored. No additional sources cited.

  • Peter Matthiessen's Far Tortuga

    (5 pp) Although this initially appears as an adventure story, anyone who knows Peter Matthiessen's work will be ready for much more, and view the sparse writing and revelation through dialog, as rhythmic as the sea itself. Far Tortuga (1975), like his other works, is distinguished by a love of nature, and an urgent concern that the elemental harmony between man and nature is in great jeopardy, as well as the belief in the cyclic process of the universe.

  • Arthur C. Clarke and Gentry Lee's Rama II

    This 3 page paper explores the science fiction novel written by Arthur Charles Clarke and Gentry Lee. Characters are discussed in depth. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Human Relationships

    This 5 page paper takes The Birds by Aristophanes, four Woody Allen films, and Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra and finds common ground. Human relationships are the focus of this paper that highlights the use of comedy. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Battle of Gettysburg and Geography's Importance

    This 5 page paper provides a discussion on Killer Angels by Michael Shaara in reference to geographic considerations. Killer Angels intricately portrays events that occurred during the Battle of Gettysburg. No additional sources cited.

  • Howard's End and the Symbolism of Materialism and Culture

    A 7 page paper that examines the concepts of culture versus materialism and practicality versus intellectualism as presented by the Schlegel and Wilcox families in E.M. Forster's 1910 novel Howard's End. Also included are discussions of the symbolism incorporated into each family characterization as well as into the physical estate of Howards End. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Feminist Approach to Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

    5 pages in length. Leslie Marmon Silko's "Ceremony" addresses a long-standing issue that has existed between Native American men and women: the open and equal pursuit of identity. That patriarchy has been the controlling social force for centuries has effectively placed the female gender in the shadows of acceptance, while the male gender has successfully progressed in all possible areas: politics, education and economics. For women, these areas have long histories of restraint through design of the woman’s role; the effects of such designs have been so well entrenched that they have automatically applied to virtually every other area of public life. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature and Analysis of Character, Theme, Symbols, and Setting

    This 11 page report discusses a number of well-known literary works that offer a broad range of styles and concepts relating to the 19th and 20th century literary experience. Authors considered are Nathaniel Hawthorne, James Joyce, William Faulkner, Henrik Ibsen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, poet Elizabeth Bishop and brief references to William Shakespeare’s “Othello” and Robert Burns’ “Red, Red Rose.” Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Heritage and Running in the Family by Michael Ondaatje

    6 pages in length. Characteristically reminiscent of Ondaatje's heritage, "Running in the Family" clearly represents the author's personal perception of reality as it not only exists within his own mind, but also how it resides within the confines of society. While the story is intricately intertwined with both past and present, Ondaatje relishes the opportunity to weave a web of secrecy and illusion, not unlike the appearance of his own life. The writer discusses how the student might compare Ondaatje's story with her own. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • An Analysis of Conde's, I,Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.

    3 pages in length. Tituba, the only black woman to be accused of witchery, had many conflicting issues in her life, not the least of which were trying to distinguish a balance between suffering and happiness in order to construct a meaningful life. In her attempt to achieve this elusive balance, she must often make a choice between freedom and love. By having to make this choice, one might readily surmise that while freedom, love and happiness were of paramount importance to her, none of them could be achieved without suffering. The writer discusses this topic as it relates to Maryse Conde's "I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem." No additional sources cited.

  • Gwen Harwood's 'Suburban Sonnet'

    A 5 page paper that examines the language and meaning of Australian lyric poet Gwen Harwood's Suburban Sonnet. Discussed is the poem's use of imagery and metaphor as well as the dual meanings expressed by these literary devices. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Praying Our Experiences by Joseph F. Schmidt

    A 5 page paper that presents a reflection of Joseph F. Schmidt's Praying Our Experiences written in the third person narrative style. Included are tutorial notes and suggestions on how this paper may be written in the first person voice or style. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • Literature and Women's Social Status

    This 5 page paper examines Poe's 'The Fall of the House of Usher ' and Hawthorne's 'Rappaccini's Daughter' and discusses the portrayal of women as evil. General trends in society are duly noted. Common themes are explored. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'On the Death of a Fair Infant Dying of a Cough' by John Milton

    This 5 page paper explicates this early Milton work. Milton's use of texture is assessed. Several techniques are explored. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Feminism in Lysistrata by Aristophanes

    4 pages in length. Swirling with elements of sex, power and control, it has been argued that Aristophanes' Lysistrata is the conception of feminism as we know it today. The plot, simple as it may seem, serves to create a sense of gender dominion unlike anything of its time; indeed, the play effectively marks the point at which women were presented as both wise and cunning. No additional sources cited.

  • A Comparison of Devil In The Shape Of A Woman and Salem Possessed

    5 pages in length. There were a number of reasons why Salem became the historical foundation of witch hunts, but none were so powerful as the threat of female independence had at that time. Without out a doubt, the fear of women's emancipation was the foremost reason for the colonial New England witch hunts. When comparing Carol Karlsen's "Devil In The Shape Of A Woman" with Paul Boyer And Steven Nissenbaum's "Salem Possessed," one immediately notes the incongruity of the two works, primarily due to the fact that Karlsen's perspective as a woman herself is significantly different from either of her male counterparts. No additional sources cited.

  • Vice and Virtue Internal Debate in Tom Jones by Henry Fielding

    5 pages in length. The internal debate that rages inside the lead character of Henry Fielding's "Tom Jones" of deciding whether he should follow his virtue or his vice is one that carries through the entire book. Clearly, Jones is compelled by benevolent forces yet he is also motivated by temptation that has a tendency to find him trouble. Many occasions find him struggling with doing what he perceives is the right thing at the moment, only to find that he has once again made the wrong decision. Analyzing what goes on in Jones' head when he experiences these moments, one will undoubtedly find that underneath his roguish exterior, he truly does want to overrule his oftentimes-shadier side. When Jones argues with himself over his conduct and the desire to act upon impulse, he is quick to acknowledge the less-than-prudent aspect of his actions; however, at the same time there is an incessant urge that many times overwhelms his better judgment, ultimately coercing him to follow through with the questionable action. No additional sources cited.

  • Metaphor of Hunting in Tom Jones by Henry Fielding

    5 pages in length. The relationship that exists between Blifil and Jones in Henry Fielding's "Tom Jones" is one that resembles the hunter and his prey. Since the time of their infancies, Blifil has quite clearly demonstrated an intolerance toward the boy who was to grow up as his brother. Indeed, Blifil made childhood and adolescence a living hell for Jones, who was routinely made the scapegoat for his blatant lies. Whether he is driven by jealousy or downright malevolence, Blifil assumes the hunter's position early on in Fielding's tale. No additional sources cited.

  • Tayeb Salih's Season of Migration to the North, Toni Morrison's Beloved and Ghosts

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts Toni Morrison's 'Beloved' with Tayeb Salih's 'Season of Migration to the North.' Themes are discussed along with the significance of spirit and the afterlife in each. No additional sources cited.

  • Protagonist Parallels Between Go Tell It on the Mountain and Catcher in the Rye

    This 5 page paper compares and contrasts these two works that both have coming of age themes. The protagonists in each--Holden Caulfield and John Grimes--are discussed in depth in terms of their spiritual and psychological journeys that deal with religion, family and the meaning of life. No additional sources cited.

  • Marriage Views of Henrik Ibsen

    This 5 page paper focuses on four themes of marriage that Ibsen exemplifies in his works Ghosts, A Doll's House and Hedda Gabler. The four characteristics of marriage that the author focuses on is the lack of independence for the female, a lack of communication between the couple, lust in the female heart and a lack of regard for commitment. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • The Storm by McKnight Malmar

    4 pages in length. The writer discusses Malmar's "The Storm" as it relates to plot, theme, character, setting, point of view, symbols and imagery, and tone. No bibliography.

  • Overview of Japanese Literature

    18 pages in length. Japanese literature exists for the lessons that can be learned via the authors' insight and experience. There are myriad themes presented in Asian literature, not the least of which includes family, patriarchy, gender, sex, death, heritage, tradition, ethnic identity, social conflict, change and celebration. However, the writer only needs to be of Asian persuasion – not specifically Japanese – in order to effectively address the complexity of these vast and varied themes. The writer discusses Yukio Mishima, Amy Tan, Pa Chin and Pyong Gap Min. Bibliography lists 13 sources.

  • Literature, Female Characters, and the Theme of Phenomenal Women

    A 5 page discussion of the theme of phenomenal women as reflected in the female characters of Andrienne Rich, Joyce Carol Oates, Marge Piercy, Maya Angelou, Linda Paston, and Susan Glaspell. This paper acknowledges each of these authors and their female characters as having a positive role not only in the personal development of the author but also in the development of the world as a whole. They are, indeed, phenomenal women. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Dakota A Spiritual Geography by Kathleen Norris

    This is a 5 page analysis of Kathleen Norris’ “Dakota: A Spiritual Geography”. Tutorial language appears throughout the text in square brackets as an aid for writers in their analysis. Kathleen Norris’ 1993 book “Dakota: A Spiritual Geography” relates the spiritual journey and shift Norris and her husband have experienced since moving to South Dakota twenty years ago to tend the family farm. Although a Protestant, she has become an oblate to the local Benedictine monastery and has come to appreciate their isolated and peaceful existence. Norris and the monks’ spirituality are heavily connected to the landscape which is beautifully described by Norris’ poetic and artistic hand but it is a landscape and an existence which must be chosen by an individual in order to be appreciated according to Norris. In a time when materialism and wealth seem to have become prevalent motivators in the world, Norris reveals to readers how spiritually satisfying her life has become as she has been able to center herself in relation to her landscape and the community she has adopted. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Ernest Hemingway's 'Hills Like White Elephants' and White Elephant Symbolism

    A 4 page paper which examines the symbolic nature of white elephants in Ernest Hemingway’s short story “Hills Like White Elephants.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Influences of Nature and Biography in the Works of Emily Dickinson

    This is a 5 page paper discussing Emily Dickinson and two poems from her Nature class. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) wrote well over 2,000 poems during her life in Amherst, Massachusetts but only seven were published while she was still alive. After her death, her poems were classified and published. Dickinson was heavily influenced by several factors in her life: the religion of her father, the impact of the Civil War, and nature. A look at two poems from her “Nature” class shows how Dickinson combines all of these symbolic elements to depict a time of loneliness, longing and false hope. Although the poems describe a time in nature when summer is just out of reach, the meanings run much deeper for Dickinson and her readers, as for her summer is a time of life, fruitfulness and happiness which has been lost. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Influences of Nature and Biography in the Works of Emily Dickinson

    This is a 5 page paper discussing Emily Dickinson and two poems from her Nature class. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) wrote well over 2,000 poems during her life in Amherst, Massachusetts but only seven were published while she was still alive. After her death, her poems were classified and published. Dickinson was heavily influenced by several factors in her life: the religion of her father, the impact of the Civil War, and nature. A look at two poems from her “Nature” class shows how Dickinson combines all of these symbolic elements to depict a time of loneliness, longing and false hope. Although the poems describe a time in nature when summer is just out of reach, the meanings run much deeper for Dickinson and her readers, as for her summer is a time of life, fruitfulness and happiness which has been lost. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • A Critical Reading of a Passage from Chuck Palahniuk's Fight Club

    This 2.5 page paper focuses on one passage in this book by Chuck Palahniuk. The narrator has just been beaten in a fight, he and Tyler can see his image in the blood on the floor. This paper is an interpretation of this scene based on the Bible. The writer offers an analogy of the image of the narrator and Veronica's veil. Veronica was the woman who wiped Christ's face at Cavalry. The writer also provides an analogy between the rules of the club and the Ten Commandments. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Carpe Diem Poems by Herrick and Donne

    A 4 page essay that contrasts and compares Herrick's poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" and Donne's "The Flea." The writer argues that both poets make use of the carpe diem them to create seduction arguments. No additional sources cited.

  • 'In Memoriam' by Alfred Lord Tennyson and its 'Spring Songs'

    This 4 page report discusses the “spring songs” of the poem’s sections 38, 83, 91 and 115. In each, Tennyson discusses the return of spring, the possibility of rebirth, and a measure of hope and reassurance. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • 'Song' by Allen Ginsberg, 'Story of an Hour' by Kate Chopin, and Love

    A 5 page paper which examines love in the short story “Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin. The idea of love is discussed in relationship to the poem “Song” by Allen Ginsberg. No additional sources cited.

  • DeLillo, Baldwin, and Kushner Literature Examination

    A 2 1/2 page paper which breifly examines some issues in “The Fire Next Time” by James Baldwin, “Homebody/Kabul” by Tony Kushner, and “White Noise” by Don DeLillo. No additional sources cited.

  • Geoffrey Chaucer's 'The House of Fame' and its Dream Sequence

    This 5 page report discusses Geoffrey Chaucer’s poem “The House of Fame” and its dream sequence. Bibliography lists only the primary source.

  • Comparison of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and Emma by Jane Austen

    A 5 page paper which examines the similarities of these novels, such as how they are representative of their time periods, how they feature women who were clearly before their time, and how rigid socioeconomic class conventions dictated gender roles and marital compatibility. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Literature, Understanding, and the Lack Thereof

    A 4 page paper which discusses how some characters in literature understand and do not understand one another. The works discussed are “The Old Wives’ Tale” by Arnold Bennett, “The Secret Agent” by Joseph Conrad, and “The Wings of a Dove” by Henry James. No additional sources cited.

  • Black Boy by Richard Wright and History

    A 3 page paper which examines some of the key historical points made within Richard Wright’s novel “Black Boy.” No additional sources cited.

  • Anita Shreve's The Weight of Water

    A 7 page paper which examines the novel’s plot, narration, characters, themes, writing style and historical accuracy. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'Ovid's Banquet of Sence' by George Chapman

    A 3 page essay that examines Chapman's sixteenth century poem "Ovid's Banquet of Sence." The writer discusses how Chapman assumed that his readers would be cognizant of numerous literary references and focuses on how Chapman's poem reflects Platonic ideals expressed by Diotima in Plato's Symposium. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Ovid's Banquet of Sence' by George Chapman

    A 3 page essay that examines Chapman's sixteenth century poem "Ovid's Banquet of Sence." The writer discusses how Chapman assumed that his readers would be cognizant of numerous literary references and focuses on how Chapman's poem reflects Platonic ideals expressed by Diotima in Plato's Symposium. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Ode to a Grecian Urn' and 'To Autumn' by John Keats

    A 7 page essay that analyzes Keats' "To Autumn" and "Ode to a Grecian Urn," with a primary focus on "To Autumn." It is Keats' rich use of language that pays tribute to this season. As the poem progresses, Keats piles up sensory images in much the same way as a farmer piles up his harvest. An examination of this poem, in comparison with another poem that exemplifies Keats' style, the famous "Ode to a Grecian Urn" reveals Keats' optimistic outlook, a perspective that found meaning in the ordinary events of life, as well as in great art. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Literary and Poetic Examples of True Love

    A 5 page paper which examines what true love is as described by literature and poetry. The paper discusses Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116,” Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “How Do I Love Thee?,” Bernard Malamud’s “The Magic Barrel,” Judith Viorst’s “True Love,” and Linda Pastan’s “Love Poem.” No additional sources cited.

  • Literary and Poetic Examples of True Love

    A 5 page paper which examines what true love is as described by literature and poetry. The paper discusses Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116,” Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “How Do I Love Thee?,” Bernard Malamud’s “The Magic Barrel,” Judith Viorst’s “True Love,” and Linda Pastan’s “Love Poem.” No additional sources cited.

  • The Secret History by Donna Tartt, Alfred Hitchcock's Rope and Education

    A 6 page paper which examines the theme of education in Alfred Hitchcock’s film “Rope” and Donna Tartt’s novel “The Secret History.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Overview of 'The Tell Tale Heart' by Edgar Allan Poe

    A 2 1/2 page paper which examines Edgar Allen Poe’s short story “The Tell Tale Heart.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

  • Character Comparison of James and Ruth in The Color of Water by James McBride

    A 2.5 page paper which compares and contrast the novel and son of this autobiographical tale. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Summary of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling

    A 10 page paper which summarizes J.K. Rowling’s novel “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.” No additional source cited.

  • Hard Times by Charles Dickens and its Biblical Theme

    This 6 page paper explores a biblical theme in Dickens' famous work. The first chapter of the work where the concept of facts is emphasized is used as a basis for discussion in terms of the spiritual versus the material world. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Things Fall Apart by Achebe and Heart of Darkness by Conrad

    A 3 page essay that contrasts and compares Achebe's Things Fall Apart to Conrad's Heart of Darkness. The writer argues that Achebe reverses the basic plot scenario seen in Conrad's novel. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver and Applicatioins of Erik Erikson and Lawrence Kohlberg's Theories

    This is a 7 page paper discussing Kohlberg and Erikson’s developmental stages as reflected in Rachel from “The Poisonwood Bible”. In Barbara Kingsolver’s 1999 novel “The Poisonwood Bible” the fifteen year old daughter, Rachel, reflects primarily Lawrence Kohlberg’s “conventional” level of moral reasoning and the progression from Erik Erikson’s “identity versus role confusion” (stage 5) to “intimacy versus isolation” (stage 6) levels of personality development. Rachel is considered the most self-absorbed of the characters within the novel and because of this her perspective remains primarily a selfish one and how her family’s environment and values impact her life and development. However, from Rachel, readers can also see a development in her awareness of her surroundings and although she remains still fairly self-absorbed she at least realizes how little impact her and her family and their Christian intentions have on the social and physical environment of the Congo showing a maturity of her moral and personal development. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver and Applicatioins of Erik Erikson and Lawrence Kohlberg's Theories

    This is a 7 page paper discussing Kohlberg and Erikson’s developmental stages as reflected in Rachel from “The Poisonwood Bible”. In Barbara Kingsolver’s 1999 novel “The Poisonwood Bible” the fifteen year old daughter, Rachel, reflects primarily Lawrence Kohlberg’s “conventional” level of moral reasoning and the progression from Erik Erikson’s “identity versus role confusion” (stage 5) to “intimacy versus isolation” (stage 6) levels of personality development. Rachel is considered the most self-absorbed of the characters within the novel and because of this her perspective remains primarily a selfish one and how her family’s environment and values impact her life and development. However, from Rachel, readers can also see a development in her awareness of her surroundings and although she remains still fairly self-absorbed she at least realizes how little impact her and her family and their Christian intentions have on the social and physical environment of the Congo showing a maturity of her moral and personal development. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • E.L. Doctorow's Ragtime and History

    A 5 page paper which discusses some of the historical perspectives, regarding the Progressive Era, presented in E.L. Doctorow’s novel “Ragtime.” Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

  • Richard Wilbur's Poem 'Love Calls Us to the Things of This World'

    An Explanation of the Poem by Richard Wilbur A 3 page discussion of Wilbur’s poem. The author of this paper provides a detailed discussion of the poet’s choice of words and discusses how this choice serves as a contrast between the spiritual and the earthly aspects of human existence. No additional sources are listed.

  • Richard Wilbur's Poem 'Love Calls Us to the Things of This World'

    An Explanation of the Poem by Richard Wilbur A 3 page discussion of Wilbur’s poem. The author of this paper provides a detailed discussion of the poet’s choice of words and discusses how this choice serves as a contrast between the spiritual and the earthly aspects of human existence. No additional sources are listed.

  • 'Eyes That Last I Saw in Tears' by T.S. Eliot

    A 6 page research paper/analysis of Eliot's poem "Eyes that Last I Saw in Tears." The writer argues that this poem conveys a haunting sense of regret, sorrow and, also, lingering guilt. The poem does not inform the reader as to why the memory of a look, the image of crying eyes, haunts the poet, yet an examination of this work clearly shows that this is what is taking place. Considering this fact, it seems logical to look at possible circumstances in Eliot's life that could have provided the impetus for this poem. By looking at both the poem and at certain known facts about Eliot's life, it is possible to find further illumination on the meaning of the poem from understanding the basis for Eliot's failed marriage. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Eyes That Last I Saw in Tears' by T.S. Eliot

    A 6 page research paper/analysis of Eliot's poem "Eyes that Last I Saw in Tears." The writer argues that this poem conveys a haunting sense of regret, sorrow and, also, lingering guilt. The poem does not inform the reader as to why the memory of a look, the image of crying eyes, haunts the poet, yet an examination of this work clearly shows that this is what is taking place. Considering this fact, it seems logical to look at possible circumstances in Eliot's life that could have provided the impetus for this poem. By looking at both the poem and at certain known facts about Eliot's life, it is possible to find further illumination on the meaning of the poem from understanding the basis for Eliot's failed marriage. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Poetic Portrayals of Icarus's Fall

    A 4 page review of the poems “Musee des Beaux” by W.H. Auden, “Landscape With the Fall of Icarus” by W. C. Williams, and “Waiting for Icarus” by Muriel Rukeyser. Interestingly the first two of these poems were inspired by the painting “Fall of Icarus” by Peter Breughel. The author of this paper describes the details of this painting and contrasts the styles of these three poets. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Poetic Portrayals of Icarus's Fall

    A 4 page review of the poems “Musee des Beaux” by W.H. Auden, “Landscape With the Fall of Icarus” by W. C. Williams, and “Waiting for Icarus” by Muriel Rukeyser. Interestingly the first two of these poems were inspired by the painting “Fall of Icarus” by Peter Breughel. The author of this paper describes the details of this painting and contrasts the styles of these three poets. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Literature and Psychoanalysis

    This 5 page paper discusses the use of psychoanalosis on characters in great works of literature. Works analyzed include: Metamorphosis, The Fox, and The Lover. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Analyzing Sylvia Plath's Poetic Voice

    This 5 page paper discusses the importance of voice in the poetry of Sylvia Plath and draws on examples from three notable works: "Daddy", "Lady Lazarus", and "Metaphors". This paper gives many quotes as examples and offers in-depth insight into why voice is so important in these poems. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • William Gibson's Johnny Mnemonic

    A 5 page research paper that examines cyberfiction via the example provided by William Gibson's "Johnny Mnemonic." The writer argues that an examination of this narrative demonstrates that cyberfiction writers, such as Gibson, are very aware of social issues and the implications of the rapidly increasing complexity of technology. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • William Gibson's Johnny Mnemonic

    A 5 page research paper that examines cyberfiction via the example provided by William Gibson's "Johnny Mnemonic." The writer argues that an examination of this narrative demonstrates that cyberfiction writers, such as Gibson, are very aware of social issues and the implications of the rapidly increasing complexity of technology. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'Smile' in the Poetry of Robert Browning and Dorothy Parker

    A 3 page essay on the use of the world "smile" in 2 poems. Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess" and Dorothy Parker in "A Certain Lady" create poems that employ the word "smile." "Smile" in each poem refers to the standard meaning of the word, that is, a facial expression in which the corners of the mouth turn upward, indicating pleasure or amusement; however, this word is employed quite differently within the context of each poem. Browning's Duke Ferrara condemns his "last duchess" because she smiled too freely and too genuinely and did not keep her smiles as something belonging solely to him. Dorothy Parker's "certain lady" convinces her lover that her special smiles are only for him, but admits that they hide a duplicitous heart. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Smile' in the Poetry of Robert Browning and Dorothy Parker

    A 3 page essay on the use of the world "smile" in 2 poems. Robert Browning in "My Last Duchess" and Dorothy Parker in "A Certain Lady" create poems that employ the word "smile." "Smile" in each poem refers to the standard meaning of the word, that is, a facial expression in which the corners of the mouth turn upward, indicating pleasure or amusement; however, this word is employed quite differently within the context of each poem. Browning's Duke Ferrara condemns his "last duchess" because she smiled too freely and too genuinely and did not keep her smiles as something belonging solely to him. Dorothy Parker's "certain lady" convinces her lover that her special smiles are only for him, but admits that they hide a duplicitous heart. No additional sources cited.

  • Content and Gender in Feminist Literature

    This 5 page paper examines the writings of four women and discusses the impact of their gender on the content of the works. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Technique, Theme, and Conflict in Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell

    7 pages in length. The writer discusses conflict, theme and technique as they relate to Orwell's 1984. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Comparison of Minfong Ho's Rice Without Rain and The Clay Marble

    A 4 page paper which compares and contrasts the two novels featuring female protagonists and set in Southeast Asia during the late 1970s and early 1980s. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Los Angeles Literature

    This 12 page paper discusses eight books about Southern California, explicates passages from each of them, and explains how the eight relate to one another. It also "grades" and evaluates each novel with regard to how it adds to the literature about Los Angeles and what value (if any) the book has to understanding the culture of Southern California. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • A Review of Call it Courage by Armstrong Sperry

    A 3 page book report on "Call it Courage" by Armstrong Sperry. No additional sources cited.

  • Depiction of Women in The Color Purple by Alice Walker

    A 3 page paper which examines how the women in Alice Walker's novel "The Color Purple" suffer because they are black, impoverished and women. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Dialogue between the Soul and the Body' by Andrew Marvell

    A 3 page essay that explicates Marvell's poem "A Dialogue between the Soul and the Body." In this poem, Marvell addresses the duality of human nature. Examination of Marvell's thought on this topic shows that he considers the perspective of the soul and the body to be contradictory. No additional sources cited.

  • 'Dialogue between the Soul and the Body' by Andrew Marvell

    A 3 page essay that explicates Marvell's poem "A Dialogue between the Soul and the Body." In this poem, Marvell addresses the duality of human nature. Examination of Marvell's thought on this topic shows that he considers the perspective of the soul and the body to be contradictory. No additional sources cited.

  • How Baumer and Kantorek in All Quiet On The Western FrontWould Respond to the poem The Next War by Robert Graves

    4 pages in length. The writer briefly discusses how Baumer and Kantorek would respond to Robert Graves' poem "The Next War." Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • 2 Questions on Great Literature and Its Practical Applications

    This 8 page paper answers two questions posed by a student. Within the answers, six pieces of literature are used: Sappho's The Moon, The Holy Bible, Shakespeare's As You Like It, Homer's Odyssey, Mahabharata and Gilgamesh. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • American Dream Represented in Literature by Homes and Houses

    A 3 page paper which examines how "Devil in a Blue Dress" by Walter Mosley and "The House on Mango Street" by Sandra Cisneros has a theme involving the house or home. This is examined against "The Tortilla Curtain" by T.C. Boyle and "The Grapes of Wrath" by John Steinbeck wherein the focus is transferred from a house, or home, to something else as it relates to the American Dream. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway on the American Dream

    A 3 page paper which examines the idea of the American Dream as seen in Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" and Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby." No additional sources cited.

  • An Analysis of The Lovely Bones

    A 3 page analysis of the narrator, the character of Susie, in Alice Sebold's novel "The Lovely Bones." No additional sources cited.

  • Jewish Literature and the Jewish Family's Decline

    A five page discussion of the insights into Jewish families that can be found in Michael Gold's "Jews Without Money" and Tony Kushner's "Angels in America". Both authors are Jewish but both present Jews in a slightly different light than might be expected. Both depict a move away from traditional Jewish morals and mores. No additional sources are listed.

  • William Faulkner's 'A Rose for Emily' and Society's Views on Sexuality

    A 3 page essay that discusses the societal context of William Faulkner's short story, "A Rose for Emily." In this story, Faulkner paints a complex psychological portrait not only of a Southern woman who is caught between conflicting social mores and her own desires, but he also shows the sociological complexity of the small Southern town in which she lived. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Restoration to Victorian Age British Literature

    This 3 page paper is a brief overview of the development of British literature from the restoration starting in about 1660, to the end of the Victorian age in 1901. The paper looks at the development of styles, content and presentation and cites numerous authors to illustrate the points raised. The bibliography cites 1 source.

  • Health and Illness Interpretations

    A 5 page research paper that review 5 stories of illness and healing. Insight into processes associated with both illness and healing do not necessarily have to come from medical texts or research on nursing. Literature abounds with works that provide perspective and understanding about how illness, even fatal illness, can promote psychic healing and the most healing elements are not always the ones that are the most obvious. The following examination of definitions of illness and healing looks at the lessons that can be learned from works of literature, each focusing on a different aspect of illness, death and learning to live. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson and Films Inspired by This Novel

    A 5 page paper which examines how the films “Fight Club” and “Memento” have themes similar to those found in Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • 'War is Kind' and 'A Mystery of Heroism' by Stephen Crane

    A 4 page paper which examines Stephen Crane’s short story “A Mystery of Heroism” and his poem “War is Kind,” and discusses Crane’s apparent attitude towards war. No additional sources cited.

  • Literature, Naturalism, and the Works of Frank Norris and Rebecca Harding Davis

    This 7-page paper focuses on comparisons when it comes to Rebecca Harding Davis' "Life in the Iron Mills" and Frank Norris' "The Octopus," and how both authors use naturalism to get their points across.

  • Water Imagery in She's Come Undone

    This 5 page paper examines the book and the water imagery found in it. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and Imagery

    A 5 page essay that discusses Andrew Marvell's seduction poem "To His Coy Mistress." In this poem, Marvell (1621-1678) employs striking use of imagery delineates both the pleasure involved in "ceasing the day" (carpe diem) and the shortness of time, which is the philosophy's rationale. The first half of the poem employs imagery to establish a sense of intimacy between Marvell and his lover. The second half employs time imagery to focus on the point that life is short. Collectively, this argument makes this one of English literature's most persuasive seduction poems. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and Imagery

    A 5 page essay that discusses Andrew Marvell's seduction poem "To His Coy Mistress." In this poem, Marvell (1621-1678) employs striking use of imagery delineates both the pleasure involved in "ceasing the day" (carpe diem) and the shortness of time, which is the philosophy's rationale. The first half of the poem employs imagery to establish a sense of intimacy between Marvell and his lover. The second half employs time imagery to focus on the point that life is short. Collectively, this argument makes this one of English literature's most persuasive seduction poems. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Alice in Wonderland and Harry Potter

    A 7 page essay that discusses Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling are children's books that share many points in common, as they both present fantastical worlds and fairy tale narratives that are drastically different from reality. The Harry Potter series, in general, has been the source of controversy because the premise entails presenting Harry as a young wizard capable of doing feats of magic, which some fundamentalist Christian organizations have found objectionable. Alice has also generated controversy in that scholarly tomes have been formulated by critics regarding the meaning of Carroll's use of symbol and allegory. Examination of these two books shows that, of the two, Harry is the more conventional in its approach, as it upholds and maintains middle-class values and ethics. No additional sources cited.

  • Questions on Death of a Salesman Answered

    A 3 page paper that gives brief answers to 7 questions on Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. Topics covered include Willy's philosophy, Biff's motivation and Willy's death as compared to Dave Singleman's. No additional sources cited.

  • Children's Literature Censorship

    This 10 page paper provides an overview of the literature on censorship in children's literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Three Popular American Novels

    This 12 page paper discusses three popular novels: The Street Lawyer by John Grisham; Daddy's Little Girl by Mary Higgins Clark; and The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd and the Power Concept

    A 5 page paper which examines the nature of power, considers the power structures that exist within the novel, how power is exercised, and how power can be abused, exploited, or corrupted, and the impact this has upon individuals and society. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Female Psychology in the Plays of Tirso de Molina

    A 14 page research paper that focuses on female characterization in the plays of Tirso de Molina (1572-1648), a playwright during the Golden Age of Spanish theatre. Examination of a variety of Tirso's plays demonstrates that--in regards to his portrayal of female characters--he was limited by the cultural standards in which he lived. In other words, women in Tirso's plays are largely relegated to subsidiary roles, which substantiate the prominence and importance of men as the pivotal focus around which everything in Spanish society revolved. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • John Keats and Ernest Hemingway

    A 3 page paper which compares and contrasts the love seen in John Keats’ poem “La Belle Dame sans Merci” and Ernest Hemingway’s short story “A Very Short Story.” No additional sources cited.

  • Science According to the Poems of Walt Whitman and Edgar Allan Poe

    A 4 page essay that compares and contrasts 2 poems by Poe and Whitman. Poe's "Sonnet--To Science" and Whitman's "When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer," address not only the same subject matter, but also they take an identical stand on the topic. While Poe's poem is the most overt in its message, Whitman also takes the stand that science, specifically astronomy, attempts to drain the beauty and mystery from life and turns the wondrous into the mundane. No additional sources cited.

  • Science According to the Poems of Walt Whitman and Edgar Allan Poe

    A 4 page essay that compares and contrasts 2 poems by Poe and Whitman. Poe's "Sonnet--To Science" and Whitman's "When I heard the Learn'd Astronomer," address not only the same subject matter, but also they take an identical stand on the topic. While Poe's poem is the most overt in its message, Whitman also takes the stand that science, specifically astronomy, attempts to drain the beauty and mystery from life and turns the wondrous into the mundane. No additional sources cited.

  • Questioning the Past in Literature of the Enlightenment

    A 4 page essay that discusses how Enlightenment literature was different from what had come before it. While the Enlightenment looked to the classical past for inspiration, its neoclassicism endeavored to find a balance with the desire to conserve against the desire to obtain independence and its own identity (Gay, 1969). This orientation can be seen clearly various works of Enlightenment writers, such as Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Voltaire's Candide and Literature of the Enlightenment

    A 4 page essay that discusses how Voltaire's Candide exemplifies the Enlightenment. Burns (1969) asserts that Voltaire "epitomized the eighteenth century period known as the Enlightenment in a manner similar to the way that "Luther epitomized the Reformation or Leonardo da Vinci did the Italian Renaissance" (Burns, 1969, p. 571). It was Voltaire who popularized the scientific and political theories of John Locke and Isaac Newton, as he promoted the Enlightenment perspective that the natural world can be understood via the use of reason. Voltaire's Candide (1759) is representative of his Enlightenment philosophy and shows the extent to which this philosophy differed radically from what came before it. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Freedom of Knowledge and the Courage of Learning

    A 5 page essay that discusses the ultimate purpose of education and the benefits of living in a society where knowledge is freely available. The writer draws heavily upon Dai Sijie's novel Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress in making points on this topic. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Children's Literature and Female Role Models

    This 30 page paper provides an overview of the roll that women play in children's literature. This paper produces some solid examples of female role models and their impact. Bibliography lists 20 sources.

  • Literary Religious Themes, Symbolism, and Imagery

    Religious imagery, symbols and thematic developments are common in the literature of a number of eras, including the literature of the early 20th century. This 5 page paper outlines these elements in E. M. Forster, in his novel Maurice, and Jeannette Winterson, in Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 'My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that discusses Emily Dickinson's poem number 754, "My Life has stood--a Loaded Gun," in which Dickinson represents herself and her life, metaphorically, as a loaded weapon, a phallic symbol that is associated with masculinity. The imagery, and the energy, that pervades the poem indicates Dickinson's deeply seated conflicted feelings concerning traditional concepts of masculinity and femininity and the symbolism she employs expresses her inner rage at the restricted nature of gender that was prevalent in Victorian society. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • 'My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun' by Emily Dickinson

    A 3 page essay that discusses Emily Dickinson's poem number 754, "My Life has stood--a Loaded Gun," in which Dickinson represents herself and her life, metaphorically, as a loaded weapon, a phallic symbol that is associated with masculinity. The imagery, and the energy, that pervades the poem indicates Dickinson's deeply seated conflicted feelings concerning traditional concepts of masculinity and femininity and the symbolism she employs expresses her inner rage at the restricted nature of gender that was prevalent in Victorian society. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Warren Adler's The War of the Roses

    A 4 page review/summary of “The War of the Roses” by Warren Adler. No additional sources cited.

  • Writing Styles of Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson

    A 3 page research paper that discusses the writing styles of Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine and whether Paine's work can be considered as literature. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Palestinians as Victims of War in Paradise Now, Making Of, and Palestine

    In four pages this paper examines the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the perspective of the Palestinians, which is rarely glimpsed in the media. Specifically considered in a discussion of Hany Abu-Assad’s film Paradise Now, Nouri Bouzid’s film Making Of, and Joe Sacco’s documentary comic graphics text Palestine are the Palestinians’ continued victimization because of the Israeli occupation and the motivation for young men to become suicide bombers, with the quest for truth also considered. Four sources are listed in the bibliography. TGparmakpal.rtf

  • Themes in The Dragon's Village

    This 3 page paper examines this work that centers on the transition in China during the era of land reform under the Communists. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • The “Journey Motif” in Literature

    This 6 page paper discusses various journeys, spiritual, psychological and physical, in several works of literature. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Cyberpunk Lit: “Neuromancer”

    This 4 page paper discusses the science fiction/cyberpunk novel “Neuromancer.” Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Robert Lowell/Skunk Hour

    A 7 page explication of Robert Lowell's poem "Skunk Hour," which was written in 1959 and describes Lowell's impressions of a Maine sea town (Lowell 131). At the beginning of the poem, that is, the first four stanzas, Lowell describes a sterile, decaying setting, which he tries to lighten with a "tone of tolerance, humor and randomness at the sad prospect" (Lowell 131). However, even in this section of the poem, Lowell's perspective drifts as it "sinks out of sight into the causal, chancy arrangements of nature and decay" (Lowell 131). Then, in the later half of the poem, i.e., the last four stanzas, Lowell's tone dramatically changes as he describes the "dark night" of his soul, which is not "gracious, but secular, puritan and agnostical. An Existentialist night" (Lowell 132). A close reading of this poem demonstrates the accuracy of Lowell's personal assessment of his poem's meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Robert Lowell/Skunk Hour

    A 7 page explication of Robert Lowell's poem "Skunk Hour," which was written in 1959 and describes Lowell's impressions of a Maine sea town (Lowell 131). At the beginning of the poem, that is, the first four stanzas, Lowell describes a sterile, decaying setting, which he tries to lighten with a "tone of tolerance, humor and randomness at the sad prospect" (Lowell 131). However, even in this section of the poem, Lowell's perspective drifts as it "sinks out of sight into the causal, chancy arrangements of nature and decay" (Lowell 131). Then, in the later half of the poem, i.e., the last four stanzas, Lowell's tone dramatically changes as he describes the "dark night" of his soul, which is not "gracious, but secular, puritan and agnostical. An Existentialist night" (Lowell 132). A close reading of this poem demonstrates the accuracy of Lowell's personal assessment of his poem's meaning. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Analysis: “In the Name of the Rose”

    This 3 page paper analyzes the novel “In the Name of the Rose” by Umberto Eco. Bibliography lists 1 source

  • Children’s Perceptions of Adults

    A 3 page paper which examines Robert Hayden’s poem Those Winter Sundays and Constance Squires’ short story Running Out of Music as they relate to children’s perceptions of adults. No additional sources cited.

  • Jay Gatsby and the American Dream

    This 6 page paper argues that F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic American novel, “The Great Gatsby,” praises and condemns the American dream at the same time. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • A Thousand Splendid Suns

    A 3 page review of the book A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Toni Morrison’s Sula: Moral Ambiguity

    A 3 page paper which examines moral ambiguity in Toni Morrison’s novel Sula. No additional sources cited.

  • Analysis of Beowulf

    In six pages this paper examines the anonymously written Medieval epic in an analysis that includes the poem’s meaning; its prevalent themes; how these themes relate to the characters, to the writer, and to society; the association (or lack thereof) to Christianity and Paganism; and considers what Beowulf, Odysseus, and Jesus Christ might have in common in anything. There are no other sources listed in the bibliography.

  • Poetic Explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose”

    In three pages, this poetic explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose” includes basic information on the poet and the poem, identifies the speaker, subject, and ideal, and also considers the poetic devices of imagery, simile, and metaphor. Two sources are listed in the bibliography.

  • Poetic Explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose”

    In three pages, this poetic explication of Robert Burns’ “A Red, Red Rose” includes basic information on the poet and the poem, ident