Research Papers on Anthropology

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

  • The Ok Tedi Mine Case Study and the Relevance of Anthropology

    This 10 page paper relies on the Ok Tedi mine fiasco to provide an impetus to argue that anthropology should be more reactive than objective. The mine issue is related to the people of Papua, New Guinea and concerns the physical and social environments. The role of anthropology is explored. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

  • Agard"s 'Listen Mr. Oxford,' William Carlos Williams' 'Impromptu', and Language Codes

    This 5 page paper explores the idea of vernacular English as opposed to standard use English through the poems of William Carlos Williams and Agard. Barbara Mellix's essay, From Outside, In and her ideas on language as identity are also included. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Gregory Bateson: Anthropology and Cybernetics

    This 5 page paper discusses the life and work of anthropologist Gregory Bateson. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • History and Linguistics of the Jamaican Creole Language

    This is an 8 page paper discussing the Jamaican Creole language. The Jamaican Creole language, also known as Western Caribbean English, has been a unique language since the beginning of the 19th century although is it still only officially linguistically classified along with Creole and Pidgin languages as “language isolate, unclassified” with the International Linguistics Center in Dallas, Texas. Because of its unique elements which differentiate it from Standard English in the areas of linguistic phonology, morphology, semantics and pragmatics, linguists believe that it should not be considered a “dialect” but should be reclassified as a “nation-language”. Not only spoken in Jamaica, Jamaican Creole is also spoken in Columbia, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Jamaican is also influencing cultures and societies around the globe as large communities of West Indians who reside in countries such as Canada and the United States not only bring their language to the culture but also elements of their music, mannerism and lifestyle which are being adopted by neighboring communities. The Jamaican language is considered an excellent example of the many languages which are participating in the “Latinization” of the English language and are important in the linguistic study of the evolution of language. Includes an outline. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • History of Colonial Order Construction

    A 10 page contention that the same construction of the colonial order which has determined much of our history also controls many aspects of our contemporary world. This contention is presented with the backdrop of the historical interaction which occurred between colonizers and the colonized to emphasize that the same scenario is unfolding today even in countries like the United States as our tendency for the world view of “us” verses “them” determines our relations with one another. With such recent incidents as the Rodney King beating, a beating forever etched into our minds by the modern technological marvel of the video camera, the construction of the colonial order has progressed forward from the pages of history and into our contemporary social consciousness. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Historical Functions of Museums

    This 10 page paper delves into museums and how they are to be considered in light of new technology. The function of museums throughout history, and throughout the world, are explored. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Colonial and Post Colonial History of Bali

    An 8 page essay that draws heavily on J. Stephen Lansing's anthropological study of Bali entitled "The Balinese" and outlines the history of this island culture during its colonial and post-colonial eras. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Anthropology, the Western Pacific Trobriander Islanders, Bronislaw Malinowski and Male Bias

    A 6 page examination of the early twentieth century work of Bronislaw Malinowski among the Trobriander Islanders. While Malinowski recognized the importance of women in Trobriander society, he missed key relationships among the sexes which not only allowed the culture to thrive but which illustrated the economic and cultural importance of females. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Overview of Egypt

    This 5 page paper gives a detailed overview of Egypt in regard to its culture, geography, social environment, daily customs, economic and political envioronment, and import/export. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Comparing the United States and France

    This 16 page paper examines the social and cultural anthropology of France and compares it to that of the United States. Various aspects are explored including geography, religion, ethnicity, and history. Similarities and differences are highlighted. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Once We Were Warriors/Postcolonial Theory

    A 6 page research paper/essay that analyzes the 1994 film “Once Were Warriors” offers an international audience a representation of Maori ethnic identity. When viewed in the light of postcolonial theory, the question that such an investigation immediately raises is whether or not the film offers an accurate vision of urban Maori society or if this film is itself a product of a postcolonial mindset. While certainly the domestic difficulties encountered by the film’s protagonists mirror the social disorder that plagues the Maori minority population of New Zealand, an examination of literature indicates that this question is complex and that an ethnic people cannot and should not facilely characterized as fitting so neatly into European-influenced stereotypes. Particularly in regards to how the film pictures Maori men. In order to argue this point, it is necessary to first look at the content of the film, then the basic arguments of postcolonial theory Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Cultural Understanding and the Reflections of Photography

    An 8 page discussion of the value of still photography and film in cultural research. The author contends that cultural history, a subcategory of both anthropology and history, is indeed replete with examples of the value of these mediums in preserving culture in a visual format. It is emphasized that this value is not exclusive to the use of photography as a documentary tool by the researcher but that instead it encapsulates the use of film produced by the culture itself. Asserts that both documentary and fictional film can be of tremendous research value.

  • Subjugation in Rabbit-Proof Fence

    An 8 page discussion of the concept of manifest destiny as it is illustrated in the film "Rabbit-Proof Fence". The author reviews the plot of this film and compares the blatant discrimination experienced by the characters with other acts of discrimination conducted against other aboriginal peoples around the world. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Family and History of the American South

    A 3 page essay on southern family life. The writer discusses the relevance of family history in the way many southerners perceive themselves today. Race relations, culture, and other historical factors all contribute to the importance of family in this region of the Untied States. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Perspective Comparisons of Western Civilization A Brief History by Marvin Perry and Ishmael by Daniel Quinn

    5 pages in length. Humankind's history has been filled with advancements; indeed, one can readily argue that since the very first time man realized he had the ability to formulate specific answers to problematic questions, he has been furthering the human race without so much as a reprieve. This unwavering progress has been recorded and taught in every classroom of every school all over the world. It would never occur to anyone who has spent his or her entire life believing such teachings that there could be something incredibly wrong with the manner by which humanity has furthered its own species. This is precisely the point of Daniel Quinn's Ishmael, which effectively characterizes the origins of civilization as nothing short of disastrous for both the planet and other species alike. When compared with the likes of Marvin Perry's Western Civilization: A Brief History, it becomes quite clear how mankind demonstrated the damaging characteristics of individualism from the beginning. No additional sources cited.

  • History of Egypt and the Early Egyptian Hyksos' Rise and Fall

    A 10 page overview of the entry of the Asiatic peoples known as the Hyksos into Egypt, their contributions to Egyptian history and technology, and their defeat at the hands of Kamose, his younger brother Ahmose, and their father Seqenenre, a Theban king. Emphasizes that while the Hyksos reign is often characterized as being one of hardship and cruelty, these peoples offered tremendous technological advancements to Egypt. These advancements, in part, included the horse and chariot, the introduction of copper and bronze, an improved version of the battle ax, and even the compound bow. Comments on Hyksos material culture and their similarities to ancient Egyptian/Mesopotamian cultures in general. Bibliography lists 11 sources.

  • Displays Featured in Washington D.C.'s Museum of Natural History

    A 5 page paper which discusses the displays of Asia, Africa, and South American in the Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • 3 Articles Analyzed Pertaining to Twenty Fifth Egypt Dynasty Kush History Until Meroe Concentration

    This is a 7 page paper discussing three articles on Kush history from the 25th dynasty in Egypt until their concentration in Meroe. The history of the Kush of Nubia is recounted in three articles by Helen Chapin Metz, Claude Rilly and Noah Kippley-Ogman. The Kush were concentrated in Nubia until the expansion of their strength and influence eventually led to them conquering Egypt around 750 B.C. and ruled during the 25th dynasty until approximately 656 B.C. At this time, they were invaded by the Assyrians which led to their retreat to Napata and eventually Meroe. Once concentrated in Meroe, the Kush became a major trading force based on their central location and production and trade of their own iron. Eventually however, the Kush became weakened through the exploitation of their own resources which led to the loss of their farming industry and the end of the Roman empire which reduced trade along their route. Meroe was eventually conquered by the Axumite army A.D. 350 thus ending their independence. Metz, Rilly and Kippley-Ogman provide slightly different perspectives, details and areas of concentration in their articles which provide readers with an overall history of the Kush but are not necessarily consistent in the details of each era of the Kush. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • A World Societies History

    This 6 page paper compares and contrasts the cultures and civilizations of: Africans, Pre-Columbians, Asian, Islamic peoples. Examples, features, history examined. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Cocaine and its History

    A 6 page discussion of the early history of cocaine. The author traces cocaine from the coca plant utilized by the traditional peoples of the Andes through the late nineteenth century and the invention of Coca Cola and various other products that commonly contained the drug. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

  • Literature Review on Peasantry

    This 20 page paper reviews literature on the subject of peasantry. Classical materials are presented and while classic authors and theories are discussed, postmodernism and feminism is also included. Bibliography lists 30 sources.

  • Literary Portrayal of the Aboriginal

    This 8 page paper discusses the view of the aboriginal from the viewpoint of the aboriginal and the viewpoint of the outsider. Examples given from Native Americans, Australian aboriginals, and Maori from New Zealand. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • America from a Multicultural Perspective

    A 14 page contention that contemporary America has set the stage in terms of providing an example to the world of a multicultural country. The author of this paper provides observations on how the various fractions that compose our country interrelate. These observations are provided first from an academic approach, relying on the sociological and anthropological literature, then from a humanistic perspective relying on the popular literature. Bibliography lists 12 sources.

  • Karen B. Strier's 'Primate Behavioral Ecology From Ethnography to Ethology and Back'

    An 8 page review of an article published in the March, 2003 edition of the "American Anthropologist" by author Karen B. Strier. The article's focus is delineated and the content criticized both in relation to the work her literature review encompasses and to work that it does not encompass. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • Comparative Analysis of US and Japan Structuring of Youth Sports

    A 5 page essay comparing the structure of youth sports in Japan to the structure of youth sports in the United States, concentrating primarily on the schooling period that equates to middle- and early secondary school in the United States. Japanese students operate on a modified year-round school schedule and the school days are much longer than those of the U.S. In addition, more than half of the students of middle school age also attend private tutoring classes five and six nights each week, and three hours of homework daily from the public school is common. Japanese students have little time for sports activities of any kind, and the structures between the two countries are very different. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

  • U.S. and Japan Pro Sports

    A 5 page essay comparing the professional sports of Japan and the United States. Though almost every Japanese citizen follows their traditional sport of sumo wrestling, the growth of baseball in popularity and following in recent years has led even the Japanese to refer to it as the national sport. Nearly a mirror image of its American counterpart in administrative structure, it has allowed Japan to add another, unexpected, export: professional baseball players to U.S. teams. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Theory of Human Caring/Jean Watson

    A 9 page research paper that offers an overview of Watson's nursing theory. The topics covered include the basic concepts and assumptions that define this highly utilized nursing theory, as well as a specific example that demonstrates how Watson's theory can be applied to context of a caring moment within the context of a therapeutic nurse/ patient relationship. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Article Analysis/Evidence-Based Practice

    A 9 page article analysis of a research study, Pravikoff, Tanner and Pierce (2005), that was designed to evaluate the knowledge, computer literacy skills and general readiness of American nurses to implement evidence-based nursing practice. The writer summarizes and evaluates each section of the study, concluding with an evaluation of the research's significance to nursing. No additional sources cited.

  • Pacific Ocean and Totem Poles

    A 5 page research paper detailing the importance of the Pacific Ocean to Native American Indian Culture. Bibliography lists four sources.

  • Linguistics and Culture

    A 4 page overview of language and how it reflects culture. The author considers a fictional culture with no word for ocean, many positive words for child, only plural words for leader, no word for war, words describing men and women only in terms of the domestic relationship, many words for grain and no words for meat products and discusses what that must mean in terms of this culture's ideologies and lifeways. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Psychology Students and College Campus Linguistic Subcultures

    A 5 page contention that one does not have to travel to far away and exotic places to encounter linguistic subcultures. The author demonstrates that even psychology students utilize language which sets them apart from other students and, in effect, allows them to be classified as a subculture. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Psychology College Student Language Observations

    A 7 page demonstration that linguistic subcultures can be found in even the most common of places. The author demonstrates that even psychology students utilize language which sets them apart from other students and, in effect, allows them to be classified as a subculture. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Aborigines of Australia and Social Darwinism

    A 5 page contention that racism has been one of the primary shapers of contemporary Australian society. In the nineteenth century in particular the concept of racial inferiority was purported by a number of disciplines. Anthropology, medicine, psychology, and sociology all became vehicles of racism as they proposed and supported theories which perpetuated disenfranchisement and segregation of the aborigines from mainstream Australian society. The premises of social Darwinism held that the fittest would survive while the weaker and inferior aborigines would perish. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Theory of 'Indeterminancy of Translation' by Willard V. Quine

    This is a 15 page paper discussing Quine’s theory of indeterminacy of translation. Willard V. Quine was a mathematician and philosopher who lived from 1908-2000. During the last half of the 20th century, Quine developed several theories, one of which was the theory of indeterminacy of translation, which challenged some of the former assumptions used in the fields of psychology, linguists and anthropology. Quine asserted that accurate translations between languages could not be made for a number of reasons. Firstly, linguists could not get basic terms of references, or starting elements, because from a holistic perspective, sentences are the basic form of meaning and all sentences are semantically linked by the native speaker. Secondly, “meaning” could not be considered as an absolute element. In addition to some of these basic changes in the construct of translations, Quine also discussed the idea that not only were correct translations into English not possible but also two translation manuals given the same observational stimuli could also not be interchangeable because of the assumptions and the linguist’s imposition of his own beliefs and patterns onto the native language. Obviously, Quine’s theories were criticized as linguists made the case that several translations were considered successful because smooth negotiation and conversation could take place between native speakers and foreign speakers. However Quine’s dissection of the linguist’s process into one of a mathematical and scientific process is considered one of the most significant within the last fifty years in linguistic philosophy. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

  • Sex, Gender, and Sexuality in WSJ Ad

    This 4 page anthropology essay looks at the way sex, gender and sexuality are used in the WSJ ad for the Times Reader. Bibliography lists 1 source.

  • The Nature of Research, Sexuality, and Cultures

    An 8 page consideration of the factors influencing research in sexuality. This paper contends that our understanding of one of the most basic aspects of human life, the aspect of human sexuality, has been warped on a number of fronts by well-meaning yet terribly wrong researchers and scholars who make one pronouncement after another that “this” is the way things are. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Anthropology of Rock Music

    This 3 page paper examines rock music in terms of effects on culture as well as its alliance with different cultures. Many examples are provided. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Complexities of Ethnomusicology

    An 11 page discussion of the complexities of ethnomusicology. This paper defines the term and provides insight into how it provides insight on a culture's lifeways and origins. Bibliography lists 9 sources.

  • Analysis of Merriam's Preface

    This 6 page reflection paper offers analysis of the Preface to Alan P. Merriam's 1964 text The Anthropology of Music. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

  • Cultural Identity According to Margaret Mead

    This 5 page paper discusses the influence of Margaret Mead's theories on cultural identity. Factors such as art, religion, music and social structures are the key to understanding a culture's true identity and as such are analyzed using several world cultures as examples. Quotes cited from text. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

  • Political Power, Supernatural Rituals and Anthropology

    This is a 4 page paper discussing supernatural rituals and political power, misunderstanding and civilization, and individualism within American culture. Three central ideas within modern day anthropology are discussed, namely: the political functions of supernatural rituals; the misunderstanding of civilization; and, the core values of American culture in relation to the unequal distribution of wealth and the public education system. Supernatural rituals have a political function which can be twofold: those who are influential within the religious structure in society carry that power beyond the ritual itself; and, politically, those who wish the support of a large population within society can align themselves with a religious group. Misunderstanding and illusions for truth are part of the realizations of a young daughter in Barbara Kingsolver’s novel “The Poisonwood Bible” but these ideas are applied to anyone’s idea of his or her own civilization which becomes wholly dependent and built on one society but is inapplicable to another. Finally, the idea of “individualism” within the United States has become so profound that those who are wealthy within the U.S. (including the government itself) have done little for those who are less fortunate. This is well reflected in the high poverty rates in the country and the public school system which is unable to meet the basic needs of its citizens. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

  • Article Critique of 'Beyond Theology' by Judith Nagata

    A 5 page summation and critique of an article by Judith Nagata entitled "Beyond Theology: Toward an Anthropology of 'Fundamentalism.'" In this article, Nagata offers a comprehensive overview of scholarship on the topic of "fundamentalism," arguing, primarily that this label has been used in identity politics as a demarcation that establishes specific boundaries and demonizes those outside those boundaries as "other," the enemy, as "fundamentalist." She also attempts to formulate an anthropological approach to this topic that provides a synthesis of common elements amid the widely divergent cases where this term is employed worldwide. No additional sources cited.

 

Most Relevant Research Papers

Click on any of the term papers to read a brief synopsis of the research paper. The essay synopsis includes the number of pages and sources cited in the paper.

 

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